Escape from Freedom and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Escape from Freedom Paperback – 31 Dec 1994

6 customer reviews

See all 23 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.79
Paperback, 31 Dec 1994
£9.54 £2.70
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 301 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company Inc; Owl Book ed edition (31 Dec. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805031499
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805031492
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.1 x 20.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 477,905 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Erich Fromm was born in Frankfurt, Germany on March 23, 1900 and was still living there and in Berlin Germany when Hitler took power but he managed to escape to New York which was, way back then, a bastion of freedom. Erich Fromm was a German-American Jewish social psychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist, humanistic philosopher, and democratic socialist. He was associated with what became known as the Frankfurt School of critical theory. Beginning with his first seminal work of 1941, Escape from Freedom (known in Britain as Fear of Freedom), Fromm's writings were notable as much for their social and political commentary as for their philosophical and psychological underpinnings. Indeed, Escape from Freedom is viewed as one of the founding works of political psychology. His second important work, Man for Himself: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Ethics, first published in 1947, continued and enriched the ideas of Escape from Freedom. Taken together, these books outlined Fromm's theory of human character, which was a natural outgrowth of Fromm's theory of human nature. Fromm's most popular book was The Art of Loving, an international bestseller first published in 1956, which recapitulated and complemented the theoretical principles of human nature found in Escape from Freedom and Man for Himself — principles which were revisited in many of Fromm's other major works. After escaping from the Nazis, Erich Fromm became an American citizen in 1940. After the war was over, Fromm moved to Mexico City where he became a professor of the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He stayed in Mexico until 1974 when he returned to Switzerland. He died on March 18, 1980 in Locarno, Switzerland. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Dec. 1997
Format: Paperback
The thesis of this highly illuminating book is that in order to escape a sense of anomie and its attendant seeming rootlessness many people resort to things in society that superimpose an identity on them, a kind of drive-up window for a world view if you will. Thus you get things like religious cults and Nazis at the extreme and Republicanism and Liberalism more toward the center. The ultimate message of this book is to think for yourself and try not to give in to the comfort of a group and its inherently limiting regulations.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Jan. 1997
Format: Paperback
There is a lack of freedom in our world, even in the best of democracy.

Unfortunately, the only reason we are not free is because we choose not to be. In fact we are trying very hard to escape from freedom just like the title says and that is a very pessimistic thought. If there was a plot to keep us from reaching our individual freedom like some people think, that would be optimistic - In that case we could have a revolution. But the way things are we need billions of inner revolutions, and that's an implausible scenario.

All essential problems of human situation are thoroughly and clearly described in one place. If you are unhappy with your life, your surroundings, or feel weltschmerz of some kind, you'll find all the answers right here. It is incredible that book which is read so lightly almost like some novel, is so filled with wisdom and deepest understanding of human mind and it's problems.

In my opinion Erich Fromm and his entire opus are by far the most important event in Psychology and Sociology in this century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Sept. 1998
Format: Paperback
By detailing man's progression from a feudal society to our current status of individual freedom (unconnectedness), Fromm illuminates the motivating factors of man's desire to belong. This book exposes many societally accepted maneuvers we use to rejoin ourselves with nature and details painful consequences of our "freedom" and isolation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback