Food Enzymes for Health & Longevity and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Food Enzymes for Health & Longevity on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Food Enzymes for Health and Longevity [Paperback]

Edward Howell
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 7.05
Price: 6.97 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
You Save: 0.08 (1%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Thursday, 31 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 6.62  
Paperback 6.97  

Frequently Bought Together

Food Enzymes for Health and Longevity + Enzyme Nutrition: The Food Enzyme Concept
Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Lotus Press; 2nd Revised edition edition (12 Mar 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0941524280
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941524285
  • Product Dimensions: 21.5 x 13.7 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 504,187 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Synopsis

Revised and enlarged, this book includes much of the research material utilised by Dr. Howell to develop the food enzyme concept. It also includes hundreds of references to support the conclusions and sets forth a number of principles

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It is a dictum of science that man's early progenitors were similar to present day anthropoids in form and habit. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

5 star
0
4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.0 out of 5 stars
3.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Part of the basic premise makes sense but..., 7 Feb 2012
By Jodi-Hummingbird TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
I agree with this book when it says that digestive enzyme supplements improve digestive health, improve food intolerance and support the pancreas and the heart (by saving them the significant efforts needed to digest food) which improves general well being and physical functioning. Having lots of digestive enzymes available leaves your body with more energy and bodily resources free to do other jobs, such as healing the body from disease.

But I don't agree that the evidence (or simple logic) supports some of the other claims and recommendations in this book.

For example, this book talks about the importance of an enzyme rich diet. It then points out that foods which have a higher caloric value have a lot more enzymes in them; so foods such as meat, milk and eggs eaten raw (or lightly cooked in the case of meat and eggs) are high in enzymes and foods such as raw vegetables and fruits are very very low in enzymes.

Yet the book then goes on to talk about a diet very high in raw fruits and vegetables (75% is the figure quoted I think) being the most important thing for enzyme levels. How does that make any sense at all?

Wouldn't one wanting to follow this guideline do best making sure to eat the high enzyme foods raw such as meat, milk, honey and eggs eaten raw (or lightly cooked in the case of meat and eggs) and to make sure that intake of these high enzyme foods is adequate - as well as adding some extra high enzyme fermented foods to the diet too? Foods like fermented fish, kefir, yogurt, sauerkraut and so on. Eating lots of fruit and vegetables is important to health of course but these other foods are far more important when it comes to taking in enzymes, and should at the very least be given equal billing as the fruits and vegetables, surely.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
55 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent proof for raw diet promoters 27 Nov 1997
By gilg@iniaccess.net.au - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book takes the view that the human body is totally dependant on Enzymes for health and longevity. Whilst not rejecting orthodox nutritional principles it concludes that the body utilises food enzymes for digestion and converts spare enzymes for the 1001 other metabolic processes our body undergoes each day. Dr Howell establishes through copious(!) references tot he literature that our body has a limited capacity to store and produce enzymes and that cooking food effectively destroys the enzyme content of foods. He reaches the conclusion that the Western Diet of cooked and processed food substains us for only so long and begins to poison us from a fairly early age. Being a non-medical person I couldn't challenge any part of this book and would recommend it unreservedly to anyone looking to research the area of natural nutritition and medicine.
37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars this "revised edition" is a fraud 8 Feb 2010
By James Daly - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
OK, this book is not really a fraud, however this "revised and enlarged" edition had additions to it that were so badly written that I initially thought it was a fraud.

The book Enzyme Nutrition was referenced from Ron Schmidt's book, The Untold Story of Milk. It was also recommended in Sally Fallon's book: Nourishing Traditions. When I saw a 2nd edition was also available, I thought it would be good to get both. After reading both books carefully, I found this 2nd edition very confusing.

The introduction and interview at the beginning of this book recapped some of the basic information in the original. It explained that cooking food destroys the enzymes in food. When we eat nothing but cooked food, we eat food with no enzymes. To compensate, our pancreas must produce digestive enzymes, and this puts unnecessary wear and tear on our pancreas. Also, the pancreas is so busy producing enzymes, it never gets a chance to create hundreds of metabolic enzymes that keeps the body's tissue in good health. Eating modern processed and cooked foods are missing enzymes that contribute to many of the modern degenerative diseases we see today. Unfortunateally, I cannot see how the information in the following chapters support his theory, as it does in the original.

The nameless editor of this 2nd edition claims it contains "all the material in the 1980 edition of the of the book, with minor correction and modifications for the sake of clarity." (page 1) Except for the introduction and first interview, the rest of this book is more confusing than the original. The wording of this book has more complex medical terms than the simple wording for the layman found in the original.

If you don't believe me, preview both books on Amazon.com for yourself! (the paper back edition - NOT the kindle edition) Compare the contents and you can see what I mean. The contents of the original, has 9 concise chapters that uses simple words to explain enzymes to the layman. If you look at the "revised edition" you will see over 23 chapters with complicated medical terms. I looked at chapter 22, and noticed it was titled "Hypoglycemic and hypoglycosuric action of enzymes" I forgot the difference between hypoglycemic and hypoglycosuric was, so I looked them up in the glossary. Hypoglycemic was in the glossary, but Hypoglycosuric was not! According to the back cover, this glossary was "incorporated to facilitate understanding of the contents." Yet this is foolish, because if this was really a "revised edition" with only "minor modifications for the sake of clarity," it would not need a glossary. Nor would it need an ending chapter called "summary and conclusions." Nor would it need a following chapter titled "condensed summary and conclusions."

A lot of other useful information is missing, such as the 4-page long warning about refined sugar, linking sugar to obesity and coronary heart disease is missing. The useful information about enzyme activity in seeds is missing - explaining why it is important to soak or sprout seeds is missing. Most of the useful information about the importance of raw milk and raw meat is more difficult to understand.

I could go on and on, but I think you get the idea. This is why I Initially thought this book was a fraud.

Added summer 2010

When I re-read page 2 of the preface, Howell makes it very clear that this book is a rough draft. So, I ordered an older copy of "food enzymes for health and longevity," that was copyrighted in 1980. (this book is copyrighted in 1994) I found in copyright statement that it was originally published under the title "status of Food Enzymes in Digestion and Metabolism," copyright 1946. When I looked on P. 165 of Howell's other book "Enzyme Nutrition, The Food Enzyme Concept," I found some information about Dr. Howell. After he wrote the "Status of Food Enzymes in Digestion and Metabolism," he spent the next 20 years expanding on it. He completed "Enzyme Nutrition" a 700 page book, and then wrote an abridged version, called "Enzyme nutrition, the food enzyme concept," which is his other book available on Amazon.

That is why this book is so confusing. Not because the information in it was intentionally scrambled, but because it is really just a rough draft! The problem is that when it was copyrighted again in 1994, the nameless editor does not tell you this in his preface. Also, the editor also provides a garbage glossary. That is why I was so unhappy when I wrote my original review.

So my conclusion is this: Only get this book if you loved "Enzyme Nutrition, the food enzyme concept." You may find a little more interesting supporting information in the interviews. I still find the majority of the body of text is still confusing and difficult to read.

Added Winter 2011

When I read the book "The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer" By Nicholas Gonzalez, and Linda Isaacs, there are physiologists that discredit enzyme therapy in treating cancer patients because they say that when enzymes are taken orally, they are destroyed by the digestive system. On page 141 they quote directly from this book - as supporting evidence to show that the physiologists who were discrediting enzyme therapy were wrong.

They quoted a section from this book:

What I believe is one of the most outstanding researches so far recorded on the fate of enzymes when taken orally was undertaken by Masumiz, Medical Clinic, Tohoku Imperial University, Japan. Masumizu's work is remarkable in several ways. The experiments were conducted, not upon isolated specimens of urine, but upon the complete 24 hour excretion, thereby insuring the presence of all enzymes excreted, instead of only a portion. The experimental animals, 10 rabbits, were given by os [mouth], 5 grams of pancreatin or 5 grams of fungus amylase for each rabbit per day. Since this dosage is comparatively enormus for small animals, the experiments prove beyond doubt that even large quantities of enzymes can be a absorbed and find their way into the urine. Although Masumizu proved that urinary excretion of amylase was approximately doubled when the enzymes were given, he was unable to secure any increase in the serum amylase concentration at all. He remarks that in all his experiments the level of amylase in the serum always remained constant and his figures bear out this contention. This confirms the observation of Oelgoetz who likewise found the serum amylase level uninfluenced by ingested enzymes...

The reason I quoted this was because to me, the layman who is interested in nutrition, the above paragraph made no sense to me, and typical of the reading found in this book. However, if you are getting your PHD in using pancreatic enzymes to treat cancer - than this could be a useful resource for you!

I am still not going to change my rating for this version of the book because of the horrible glossary, and the lack of information in the preface, explaining what exactly this book is a revision of.
25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for the average reader 14 Oct 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book has a lot of good information, but it reads like a research paper (which it was origionally, I think). Unless you're doing a research paper, there might me more helpful books to buy.
18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent find 23 Mar 2005
By Ben - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Unfortunately, these amazing books are not the easiest to find. I believe this is another book in my list of the most important books of today. Two others I believe in are Natural Cures by Kevin Trudeau and Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You. These books changed my family, literally. If you care about yourself, you owe it to yourself to read these books.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Part of the basic premise makes sense but... 2 Feb 2012
By Jodi-Hummingbird - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I agree with this book when it says that digestive enzyme supplements improve digestive health, improve food intolerance and support the pancreas and the heart (by saving them the significant efforts needed to digest food) which improves general well being and physical functioning. Having lots of digestive enzymes available leaves your body with more energy and bodily resources free to do other jobs, such as healing the body from disease.

But I don't agree that the evidence (or simple logic) supports some of the other claims and recommendations in this book.

For example, this book talks about the importance of an enzyme rich diet. It then points out that foods which have a higher caloric value have a lot more enzymes in them; so foods such as meat, milk and eggs eaten raw (or lightly cooked in the case of meat and eggs) are high in enzymes and foods such as raw vegetables and fruits are very very low in enzymes.

Yet the book then goes on to talk about a diet very high in raw fruits and vegetables (75% is the figure quoted I think) being the most important thing for enzyme levels. How does that make any sense at all?

Wouldn't one wanting to follow this guideline do best making sure to eat the high enzyme foods raw such as meat, milk, honey and eggs eaten raw (or lightly cooked in the case of meat and eggs) and to make sure that intake of these high enzyme foods is adequate - as well as adding some extra high enzyme fermented foods to the diet too? Foods like fermented fish, kefir, yogurt, sauerkraut and so on. Eating lots of fruit and vegetables is important to health of course but these other foods are far more important when it comes to taking in enzymes, and should at the very least be given equal billing as the fruits and vegetables, surely.

A diet that is 75% or more made up of raw fruits and vegetables is in fact a low enzyme diet, compared to a diet made up of lots of high enzyme foods like raw milk, kefir, and so on, as well as just cooked or raw vegetables. The book also says that the enzymes in enzyme capsules are far stronger than food enzymes. This is yet another reason a 75% raw fruit and vegetable diet without enzyme capsules is in fact a very low enzyme diet.

This book says that pigs that eat cooked potatoes fatten faster than those fed raw potatoes and that this must be because the lack of enzymes in the cooked potato. But surely the fact that starchy foods are well known to have more of an impact on blood sugar levels etc. when they are cooked would be a far more likely explanation? Pasta cooked al dente has less of an impact on blood sugar levels than pasta that is cooked until it is really soft, for example. Perhaps this fact wasn't known in 1946, I am not sure. The book advocates a diet high in carbohydrates, despite the fact that so many of us do very poorly on such a diet.

The book points to a study that showed that rats lived longer where they ate raw foods as compared to a processed 'chow' and claims that the only reason for this must be the lack of enzymes in the non-raw diet. But again, of course a diet with real food in it will be far healthier than a diet of highly processed food with a few added synthetic vitamins and minerals. It doesn't at all follow that this must be due to lack of enzymes. Again, there are other far bigger variables at play here. It is also a bit weird comparing the effects of cooked foods on animals and then on humans when only in humans was this something done by them for a long time, starting a long time ago. Rats are not well known for enjoying barbecues and cooking.

The book points to a study that showed that raw food was superior to tinned food. It is claimed that this can't possibly be due to a lack of vitamins in the tinned food, which is ridiculous as tinned foods are well known to have far lower vitamin levels and also to contain toxic compounds which act as anti-nutrients and so further deplete our nutrient stores. Again, there are other far bigger variables at play here. The author seems to know nothing at all of the mountains research done on nutrition and the role of vitamins and minerals in preventing and treating diseases. He writes off this whole topic fairly superficially. Of course foods with synthetic vitamins and minerals added will not have the same effect as real food, we don't even know all the different helpful compounds that make up each food and all the cofactors of each vitamin and so on, but this doesn't mean some supplements aren't immensely helpful and necessary.

One part of the book talks about a study that compared cooked food to raw food and found that raw food is superior. The raw food was a sprouted food of some sort and the cooked food was ....bread! Of course sprouts - one of the healthiest and most high-nutrient foods there is and entirely unprocessed - is going to be healthier than a highly processed and low-nutrient food like bread. There are so many more variables at play in this study than just raw versus cooked foods.

This book claims that because Eskimos eating a traditional diet doesn't get scurvy, and those eating tinned foods and other highly processed foods do, that this must be primarily due to lack of enzymes in processed foods. But it could be just as easily to do with a lack of vitamin C. The traditional Eskimo diet is high in vitamin C (from eating the adrenal glands and some other high vitamin C parts of animals) and the more carbohydrate you eat, the more vitamin C you need. So of course eating a diet high in carbohydrates and low in vitamin C would give you scurvy.

This book seems to be confusing the raw food issue with issues about unprocessed foods being healthier. Of course whole real foods are better for you than anything highly processed, but it doesn't follow that the sole or even main reason for this is lack of enzymes. There are many reasons why this is so.

I also disagree that raw vegetables are easier to digest than cooked ones. Some groups claim that the more foods we eat raw the healthier we will be, while other dispute this, and explain that humans have been heating for a very long time and that in fact cooking food makes many of the vitamins etc. more available to the body, lets us eat far more vegetables as cooking makes vegetables more compact and take less time to chew and so all vegetables we eat should be cooked. Healing expert Dr Lawrence Wilson writes:

"Many people advocate eating raw foods to obtain the "food enzymes" they contain. My experience is that this is not important. It is true that all foods contain certain enzymes that are damaged or destroyed by most cooking. Gentle steaming preserves a few of them. However, food enzymes are not the same as the digestive enzymes that are required to digest your food. It is not true that foods contain the enzymes needed to digest the food. Your body, not the food, must supply the bulk of the enzymes needed to digest the food. This is the important point. The only foods that I suggest people eat raw is certified or good quality raw dairy products and some other oils such as olive, flaxseed, and hempseed oils."

This tallies with my own experience. It is also backed up by books on gut health and digestion such as the GAPS diet and others. The book 'Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human' also has some good evidence on cooked vegetables being easier to digest than raw ones in the healthy stomach.

For me and for many other ill friends, eating raw vegetables is agony. They don't digest and just sit in the stomach like a rock, while cooked vegetables digest very easily. The idea that vegetables eaten raw are easier to digest is a myth that seems to never die. For many of us with severe digestion problems the difference between raw and cooked foods is like night and day.

Raw vegetables will often be very difficult for ill people to digest and may need to be avoided completely or almost completely until and unless digestion improves. Juices are usually an exception and easy to digest in a raw form due to the lack of fibre. Sometimes just lightly steaming vegetables will be enough, while others may need more moderate cooking to be digested well. Fruit may also be better tolerated if it is lightly cooked or even stewed first. Eating foods that you can digest easily, as opposed to foods that your stomach has problems with, means that your body has to expend less energy digesting your meals. Cooked foods may be digested more easily than raw foods, soaked and dried nuts and seeds are digested more easily than raw nuts, meats that are not overcooked are easier to digest than overcooked meats that have become tough, and so on.

I persevered for ages trying to eat a few of my vegetables raw, because I kept reading that the enzymes in these foods were important. When I started reading about how this information was wrong and switching almost entirely to cooked vegetables and even fruit...I felt such a big difference right away! So I really want to let others know about this if I can. The idea of raw vegetables being easier to digest is sadly written about as if it is a set in stone fact in dozens of otherwise very good health books I have been reading lately.

Eating cooked vegetables is also much more pleasant! They are easier to eat and taste far better too. Cooked strawberries are delicious and cooking stone fruit makes them taste amazing, even if the fruit wasn't the tastiest to begin with. Adding enzyme capsules and delicious homemade fermented foods such as sauerkraut made my stomach feel so much better too! Sauerkraut is easier to digest than a salad any day! You can feel the difference.

I agree with the author that cooking at very high heats isn't the best way to cook vegetables though, or anything else. Primitive man cooked food far less rigorously than we often do today.

Part of this book was written in 1946 I think, and parts of it perhaps in the 80s and 90s. So critiquing it in 2012 may be unfair. It is quite technical in parts, and not really aimed at a reader who just wants some simple tips to improve their health. It was interesting to read in parts though I thought.

Taking proteolytic enzymes systemically is something worth considering for every illness. Taken on an empty stomach these enzymes free up bodily energy and enzyme making ability for other healing related tasks. Taken with meals they can aid digestion too. There is good information on enzymes and dosages in book by Dr Sherry Rogers and books on the Gerson program, and many others.

Jodi Bassett, The Hummingbirds' Foundation for M.E. (HFME) and Health, Healing & Hummingbirds (HHH)
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback