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  • Entertainer [DVD] [1960] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
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Entertainer [DVD] [1960] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

21 customer reviews

Price: £34.98
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by passionFlix UK.
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Region 1 encoding. (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details) Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.
£34.98 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by passionFlix UK.

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Entertainer [DVD] [1960] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + The Dresser [DVD] [2004] + The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (DVD + Blu-ray)
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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005AUK8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 193,877 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By F. P. Samuelson on 14 April 2006
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
what a great film! from start to finish the power of the story within never fails to deliver.An excellent cast and a story of a man seemingly hellbent on self destruction as he battles with the demons of self delusion and the end of the vaudevillian actor. On stage as Archie Rice, Laurence Olivier delivers sadness and cynicim with one breath. He is determined to elude the Inland Revenue,engage in affairs with teenage wannabees, and even persuade his old father to appear on stage with him.His marriage is on the rocks and his daughter seems resigned to father's illusions. It travels a rocky path, and provides a fascinating insight into the world of early 1960's seaside theatre.It is one of Olivier's masterpieces and was one of his personal favourites. Watch it and enjoy the journey from illusion to ruin.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 16 July 2007
Format: DVD
"Why should I care,
Why should I let it touch me?
Why shouldn't I sit down and try to let it pass over me.
Why should they stare, why should I let it get me...
What's the use of despair if they call you a square?
You're a long time dead like my old pal Fred
So why oh why should I
Bother to care?"

Archie Rice sings this depressing and cynical second-rate song as part of his depressingly bad music hall routine in The Entertainer, a depressing but skillfully acted movie. Archie Rice (Lawrence Olivier) is a third-rate, aging vaudeville entertainer, headlining his own show in the run-down English seaside resort of Morecomb. He's just about at the end of his string, playing to half-empty, bored audiences, running up debt, and desperate to stay in the business. He has a wife, Phoebe (Brenda De Banzie) who loves him and drinks too much, a daughter, Jean (Joan Plowright), who also loves him but has no illusions about him, two sons, Mick (Albert Finney), who joined the Army and is being shipped off to Suez, and Frank (Alan Bates), who works for his father in the music hall, and his own father, Billy Rice (Roger Livesey), once a headliner but now aging and retired. In the course of the movie Archie one way or another uses them, fails them or both.

The Entertainer is grim stuff. It's redeemed, I think, by two elements. First, it represents the reaction in the Fifties by British playwrights such as John Osborne to the polished, upper-class and unrealistic theater in Britain following WWII. Playwrights such as Christopher Fry and Terrence Rattigan produced hugely popular works that many thought were out of touch with reality. Then Osborne and others came along with what critics called the kitchen sink school...
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Andres C. Salama on 10 Aug. 2008
Format: DVD
Laurence Olivier stars as a sleazy, third-rate music hall performer in 1960's "The Entertainer", one of the first and best films of the so called Free Cinema movement, and a movie that is somewhat neglected today (it should be better known). Based on a play by John Osborne, Olivier plays Archie Rice, a mediocre performer in grim seaside town theaters. His shows attract few people (early in the film, we see passersby sneering at the theater marquee that falsely advertises Archie as a television comedian). His father, Billy, was once a talented and successful comedian, but now he is just a cranky old man living with him and Archie's wife, the unstable Phoebe. Archie has three grown children, played respectively by Alan Bates, Albert Finney and Joan Plowright, all very early in their careers. Jean (Plowright, who would become Olivier's wife soon after this film) comes to home from London and sees her family unraveling: one of her brothers have been sent to Suez, her stepmother is becoming more and more unstable, Archie is hounded by his creditors while he imprudently starts a romance with a beauty contestant, with the hope of obtaining financing for his shows from her rich parents. Archie's life goes downhill from here, so the film is quite bleak, but it is very well done (and especially, performed). Some critics see Archie as a metaphor of postwar England, and this may indeed have been Osborne's intention, but the film plays better as a character study of a very flawed man.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter Wade VINE VOICE on 23 Jan. 2010
Format: DVD
Archie Rice: [to unresponsive audience] Don't clap too loudly, it's a very old building.

I had been looking forward to seeing the Entertainer for a long time. I knew of it because every time they mention Max Miller they say that the Entertainer was based on his act.

It seems during Max Miller's life time that the writer John Osborne and Laurence Olivier denied it but once he was dead they said of course it was based on him. As a fan of Max Miller I wanted to see how they depicted a Max Miller type of music hall star but was a third rate exponent.

Also I am a fan of British films of the fifties an sixties as they are good examples of how Britain was at the time.

Cleverer reviewers than me will interpret the decline of Archie Rice and the music hall comedians he depicts as the decline of Britain. I can see what they mean as Archie's son played by Albert Finney is in the army and goes to Suez. This was one of the last gasps of the British empire in 1956. Britain and France tried to retake the Suez canal on their own but the US objected and because the US held the purse strings Britain had to withdraw.

I suppose it is an allegory of the music hall which declines as the British empire declines and Archie Rice like most of the British population doesn't realise it or does not want to acknowledge it. What we were doing in 1956 , ten years after a war that had bankrupted Britain doing sending an army to Egypt to reclaim assets that had been grabbed ?

It was a humiliating climb down for Britain but it finally showed us that we were not a world power any more and that we relied on the super power which at that time was the US.
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