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Enterprise Java Developers Guide: Java, Javabeans, Servlets and JNI (McGraw-Hill enterprise computing series) Paperback – Illustrated, 1 Feb 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback: 500 pages
  • Publisher: Osborne/McGraw-Hill; illustrated edition edition (1 Feb. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071346732
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071346733
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 18.9 x 3.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,788,782 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book does a pretty nice job of sorting out the current state of the major enterprise Java technologies, a rapidly developing area not yet well covered by other mainstream Java books. The authors hit all the enterprise "greatest hits" including JavaBeans, EJB, JDBC, LDAP, JNDI, Servlets, security, JavaMail, and Corba, with smaller sections on Jini, Infobus, JAF, etc. Most of these get about 25 pages each, not incredbily deep but enough for a reasonable overview.
There is a considerable amount of working code throughout, which provides a good basic starting point for using each of these technologies. This is a big improvement over other books which mostly feature achitecture-level discussions with maybe some code snippets and leave you wondering if the authors have actually tried to use any of this stuff. The last third of the book on applications is particularly good, drawing on the individual technologies in building 5 representative enterprise applications in the areas of email, internet chat, e-commerce, project tracking, and employee tracking, again complete with working code.
By the way, I'm not sure "A reader from Ohio" is talking about the same book. My copy has no subtitle or any other indication that JNI (Java Native Interface) is covered. The book I have is the same as what you see if you click on the book cover image above.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 April 1999
Format: Paperback
They give this book the subtitle of 'Java, Javabeans, Servlets and Jni'. They were trying to spell Jini! I found no reference to JNI in the book. It goes down hill from there.
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By A Customer on 4 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
This book talks about different technologies like CORBA, EJB, Servlets, LDAP etc. and shows practical examples to integrate them. Moreover it also talks about JavaMail and developing email clients using JavaStudio. I think it's worth the money I paid.
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By A Customer on 7 April 1999
Format: Paperback
First let me to complete the veview.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Valuable overview of Java enterprise-wide technologies 30 Oct. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book covers some of Java technologies for the enterprise such as JavaBeans, JB Framework, EJB, Java Mail, Infobus, JMDI, JNDI and LDAP, Servlets, JDBC, JavaSpace (basically), and so on. In addition, it talks about concurrent possible implementation such as COM and CORBA (basically). It explains the needs to move to component-based developments in a enterprise context and technologies to make use of. Excellent overview of Java Enterprise JavaBeans and the Internet security issues. Examples are well-designed, above all the E-Commerce case study. Apparently, authors wanted to give a large overview of Java technologies for the enterprise development. From that point, it's a success. Unfortunately, as I was reading this book I wanting more information, more explanations and more details. In addition, figures will have to be better drawn. I hope forthcoming releases will tackle these subjects more deeply. Plus, a chapter on today's cutting-edge Java development tools seems necessary to me. Conclusion: Good book but for mastering Enterprise Java Development, other books are necessary.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good overview of enterprise Java technologies 9 July 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book does a pretty nice job of sorting out the current state of the major enterprise Java technologies, a rapidly developing area not yet well covered by other mainstream Java books. The authors hit all the enterprise "greatest hits" including JavaBeans, EJB, JDBC, LDAP, JNDI, Servlets, security, JavaMail, and Corba, with smaller sections on Jini, Infobus, JAF, etc. Most of these get about 25 pages each, not incredbily deep but enough for a reasonable overview.
There is a considerable amount of working code throughout, which provides a good basic starting point for using each of these technologies. This is a big improvement over other books which mostly feature achitecture-level discussions with maybe some code snippets and leave you wondering if the authors have actually tried to use any of this stuff. The last third of the book on applications is particularly good, drawing on the individual technologies in building 5 representative enterprise applications in the areas of email, internet chat, e-commerce, project tracking, and employee tracking, again complete with working code.
By the way, I'm not sure "A reader from Ohio" is talking about the same book. My copy has no subtitle or any other indication that JNI (Java Native Interface) is covered. The book I have is the same as what you see if you click on the book cover image above.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Very useful for developing enerpise applications 6 Dec. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The examples are very practical and this book covers the fundamental concepts of the Java Entrprise components like JNDI, Servlets, LDAP, Corba JDBC so as to get you going. A must have for an Java enterprise developer.
Practical Coverage of Fundamental Concepts 28 April 1999
By Holy Spirit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I don't know from what ascept other readers rated it. But go through the book and you will find Java concepts as related to Servlets, Corba, EJBeans nicely covered with many examples. The practicle examples covering each of above techinques give good ground work in understanding and integrating all of the above tecniques.
Anand
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Covers enterprise needs 4 Jun. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book talks about different technologies like CORBA, EJB, Servlets, LDAP etc. and shows practical examples to integrate them. Moreover it also talks about JavaMail and developing email clients using JavaStudio. I think it's worth the money I paid.
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