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Enigma Variations, In the South, Serenade For Strings
 
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Enigma Variations, In the South, Serenade For Strings

1 Jun 2009 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
1:27
2
1:56
3
0:44
4
1:25
5
0:29
6
2:11
7
1:18
8
0:59
9
2:00
10
4:01
11
2:32
12
0:58
13
2:57
14
3:04
15
5:40
16
22:51
17
3:24
18
5:40
19
2:53

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jun 2009
  • Label: Signum Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2009 Signum Records
  • Total Length: 1:06:29
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002G8YL18
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 128,062 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a beautiful piece performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and conducted by Sir Andrew Davis. I purchased it specifically for Variation #9, Nimrod. My only complaint would be an issue with volume - from one extreme to the other. Is this a problem with how it was recorded or is this indeed how it should sound?

Jennifer
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Live recording adds immediacy to the elements of dinner party conversation that make up each variation, Wonderful and generous selection. Sound is great.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Unusually elegant readings, with gorgeous sonics and orchestral playing 21 April 2011
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It's hard to get noticed when you are recording the Enigma Var. for the fifth time, as Andre Davis is here; he already had a commercial recording with the Philharmonia in 1983. the occasion here was the 150th anniversary of Elgar's birth in 1857. I appear to be building up to an anticlimax, but Davis is a major Elgar conductor, and here he and the orchestra strive to bring out as much nuance and detail as possible. this isn't a reading that sounds like an old shoe. the polish of the playing is extraordinary. The only deciding factor, I think, between this and a host of earlier accounts is whether you want a more direct or refined approach.

the recording is very clear and vivid, so there's plenty of impact from the percussion and a robust brass sound. I'd go so far as to give this Cd the palm for sound, even above my old favorite, the Decca recording with Monteux and the London Sym. The Enigmas don't feature many solos, but when there are snatches of solo playing, the Philharmonia first desks live up to their reputation for elegance. For many listeners the touchstone of any Enigma is the 'Nimrod' variation, which Davis conducts with a lovely quiet elegiac feeling, never milking the melody. The finale, Var. 14, is telling, in that Davis keeps it under control rather than letting it run free. Overall this is a shaped reading rather than a spontaneous one, very satisfying on its own terms.

In the South isn't unbuttoned, either, yet there is a controlled exhilaration in the playing that is very appealing. Davis doesn't let the orchestral texture get too thick, and the orchestra once again comes through with thrilling execution. The album ends with the Serenade for Strings. For decades Barbirolli's EMI recording from the mid-Sixties has been the classic recommendation. Davis doesn't equal its fervent, heart-on-sleeve romanticism, but on the other hand, the Philharmonia strings are more supple and elegant. In all, one can find a dozen CDs of Elgar's orchestral chestnuts -- a cottage industry turns them out in Jolly Old -- but this one has its special features.
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