or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

English Poets in the Late Middle Ages (Variorum Collected Studies Series) [Hardcover]

John A. Burrow

RRP: 90.00
Price: 84.11 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 5.89 (7%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, 22 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

1 April 2012 Variorum Collected Studies Series
This volume brings together a selection of lectures and essays in which J.A. Burrow discusses the work of English poets of the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries: Chaucer, Gower, Langland, and Hoccleve, as well as the anonymous authors of Pearl, Saint Erkenwald, and a pair of metrical romances. Six of the pieces address general issues, with some reference to French and Italian writings ("Autobiographical Poetry in the Middle Ages", for example, or "The Poet and the Book"); but most of them concentrate on particular English poems, such as Chaucer's "Envoy to Scogan", Gower's "Confessio Amantis", Langland's "Piers Plowman", and Hoccleve's "Series". Although some of the essays take account of the poet's life and times ("Chaucer as Petitioner", "Hoccleve and the 'Court'"), most are mainly concerned with the meaning and structure of the poems. What, for example, does the hero of Ipomadon hope to achieve by fighting, as he always does, incognito? Why do the stories in Piers Plowman all peter out so inconclusively? And how can it be that the narrator in Chaucer's "Book of the Duchess" so persistently fails to understand what he is told?

Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

John A. Burrow is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Bristol, UK.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
ARRAY(0xa2b16150)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback