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Endless, Nameless CD


Price: £10.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Sept. 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Mushroom
  • ASIN: B0000084VY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 91,683 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Released under the Mushroom Records label back in October 1997, the `Endless, Nameless' album caused a huge stir amongst Wildhearts fans, due to its distorted sound and white noise mixing. The album produced two sets of singles, `Anthem' and `Urge'. The track `Anthem' sported Danny McCormack as lead vocalist for the first and only time.

Abandoning past sound in favour of an almost industrial punk style, the Wildhearts hid ten gorgeous pop songs behind infinite layers of noise. 'Anthem' and 'Pissjoy' emerge as tunes first, with the kind of choruses which would guarantee chart success if you could only make them out.

But the production, is utterly fantastic. The songs are still undeniably of the same breed as 'I Wanna go Where The People Go' and 'Sick of Drugs', but are elevated to even greater heights by the production. It's never gratuitously noisy. The songs were made to work with the production. It's perhaps the most innovative and misunderstood masterpiece of the nineties. And nobody has even come close since.

This 2 CD collection contains all the b-sides from the era and the booklet contains notes by Classic Rock's Dave Ling and features extensive artwork with photos and memorabilia from the era, all approved by Ginger himself --This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Isles on 16 May 2005
Format: Audio CD
This record really did launch some arguments. It really divided fans. There they were; tons of Wildhearts fans, sitting and sucking up the bright, melodic, tunetastic offerings from the best rock and roll group this country has ever produced, perfectly contented to bask in the glory of The Wildhearts that they had known and loved since their amazing debut. And then..... and then came this. A dirty album of experimentation, absolutely drenched in white noise and messed up sonics. Lots of people ran screaming for cover, crying "Oh no! What has become of my beloved Wildhearts??!" And you can forgive such a reaction upon first hearing the album. BUT, give Endless, Nameless the chance it deserves, and you might just grow to love it. There are some corking tunes on this album!! Give it that chance, and you'll hear some classic Wildhearts riffs and songs, and yes, the melodies too. Same Wildhearts punch, same brilliant song writing, just with a twist. Spend some time with it, and you may just come around to the fact that this is one hell of a cool album. Ginger and co. did not desert you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chris Hall TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Mar. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Released under the Mushroom Records label back in October 1997, the ‘Endless, Nameless’ album caused a huge stir amongst Wildhearts fans, due to its distorted sound and white noise mixing. The album produced two sets of singles, ‘Anthem’ and ‘Urge’. The track ‘Anthem’ sported Danny McCormack as lead vocalist for the first and only time. The album was released on three separate formats – CD, LP and cassette. The Japanese version was released in March of the following year with slightly different cover artwork and the bonus track, a distorted cover of the Elvis Costello song ‘Pump It Up’. This track was to also appear on a freebie Melody Maker CD.
Ginger has been repeatedly asked about many issues around the subject of this album over the past few years. The tracks are rarely played live, yet he still proclaims that the album is his personal favourite. The album reached number 41 in the UK charts.
The opening track ‘Junkenstein’ blasts out from the start with its bitter distorted sound, setting you straight into the pace of the album. As the two minute long song plays on, the volume of the track slowly raises until you reach the standard volume of the whole album.
After the little opener, you are sent straight into the sing-along favourite that is ‘Nurse Maximum’. The track burns out a changing pace, with classic Ginger-style vocals delivering the verse, which is then sent roaring into the screaming chorus that brings together catchy riffage combined with a twisted industrial sound. A glorious song!
Next we have the killer track, Anthem, which sports the rough 'n' ready vocals of bassist Danny McCormack.
Read more ›
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. J. A. Record on 9 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Step 1) Buy album. Jaw drop to floor and sobbing ensures after thinking that favourite pop rock band have released something so dirty and distorted. Throw into cd collection angrily.
Step 2) Upon grudgingly giving the album another chance discover that Junkenstein and Why You Lie are great Nine Inch Nails-esque screamers. Lob back into cd collection ashemedly.
Step 3) Come to the conclusion that Nurse Maximum is one of the best songs they've ever ever written! Place cautiously into cd collection.
Step 4) Start yelling Sounddog Babylon! at the top of your voice in the middle of the night, much to the annoyance of the street.
Step 5) Simply cannot get the groove to Anthem out of your head. BOOM boom boow boom boom bow boom boom bow.....BOOM
Step 6) Grab innocent bystanders, thrust the album into their hands and scream at them to love it until your taken away....
This album is a huge dirty distorted scream of rage with Ginger's trademark melodies buried in the mix. Don't be a closed minded fool...appriciate this slab of industrial/metal/pop and be enlightened grasshopper!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Earth Pilot on 13 Oct. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Wow, this album makes a tremendous noise and on first listen said noise doesn't sound immediately familiar as classic Wildhearts. However, like Kurt Cobain, Ginger has an acute pop sensibility, which ensures that even his most challenging songs have clear melody and a sense of progression. Indeed, this album feels like a direct evolution of earlier Wildhearts songs such as Caffeine Bomb and Suckerpunch, pointing squarely to the bands punk roots. A cover of the Dogs D'Amour classic 'Heroine' (here 'Heroin') is a standout, expertly conveying the underlying darkness and sense of menace that the song represents. Whilst for me, a couple of songs that don't quite hit the mark stop this from being an essential purchase, Endless Nameless remains a most welcome addition to the Wildhearts collection.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By George Connor on 12 July 2000
Format: Audio CD
Quite simply, the Wildhearts were the most inventive rock band to spring from the 1990s.
And, quite simply, this is the best thing they did.
It's unique and abrasive. Lots of fans hated it.
It's an argument against complacent "dad-rock" that came to prominence with Oasis and Paul Weller.
Your parents would hate this.
Bask in it's freakishness.
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