Ender's Game 2013

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(522) IMDb 6.7/10
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When an alien race known as the Formics attack Earth, the International Fleet prepare for their next attack by recruiting the most intelligent children on Earth and training them to lead the inevitable battle.

Starring:
Hailee Steinfeld,Abigail Breslin
Runtime:
1 hour, 53 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Action & Adventure
Director Gavin Hood
Starring Hailee Steinfeld, Abigail Breslin
Supporting actors Harrison Ford, Asa Butterfield, Moises Arias, Ben Kingsley, Viola Davis, Nonso Anozie, Aramis Knight
Studio Momentum Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 12 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alan Jones on 21 Dec. 2014
Format: DVD
This is an impressive and intelligent SF film which explores Earth's response to a repulsed alien invasion by a seemingly more advanced insect-like species known as the Formics. Through the heroic exploits of Mazer Rackham (played with dour grimness by Ben Kingsley) the earth survived, but not without the deaths of tens of millions of its inhabitants. It is accepted that a second attack by the Formics is inevitable and a decision has been made to launch a pre-emptive strike on their homeworld. In the fifty years since the invasion attempt Earth's International Fleet has been selecting young genius children who display the `appropriate' traits to train to become top military strategists, especially the ability to interpret complex date at a rapid speed. Ender Wiggin (an admirable performance by Asa Butterfield) is one such trainee. However, the head of the training academy, Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) believes that Ender also has the qualities which make a great leader, including ruthlessness, adaptability, an independence of mind (he displays an insolence similar to James Tiberius Kirk) and an ability to inspire loyalty. As the film progresses we observe how Ender's character develops in response to the situations he encounters. The cinematography is excellent throughout, in particular within the Training School and Battle Room where tactical skills are developed. However, it is the underlying questions presented which linger in the mind - the use of children in the military (a theme also addressed in the underrated 1999 SF film Soldier), the duplicitousness of adults and the morality behind military decisions.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A movie adaptation of an award winning science fiction novel from the 1980's Ender's Game (Ender Saga) Ender's game is a near future story in which the human race is still recovering from a war with an insectoid race. Who came very close to destroying humanity but who were just beaten off, thanks not least to the actions of one brave individual.

Knowing that the aliens could well be back one day, humanity is preparing to fight them again when the time comes to pass. The best and brightest from all over the globe are given a chance at military service. Starting from a very early age. Just in case the next war winning hero is amongst these recruits.

Ender Wiggum [Asa Butterfield] is one of those smart kids who really doesn't fit in. But Colonel Graff [Harrison Ford] thinks he might just be what humanity is looking for. Recruited into the international fleet, Ender has a tough education ahead of him. And a lot to learn.

Not least, what people will do to survive and prosper...

Described as 'Harry Potter meets Star Wars' simply because a lot of takes place in a military school with various different houses who compete against each other in a sports game, this does have a couple of fight scenes that don't pull their punches in depicting brutality, and isn't really for anyone under twelve.

As a piece of science fiction, it's not bad. It creates a credible near future environment and society. It tells a solid character drama, with a few plot twists along the way. And it does what all good science fiction should do. Make the viewer think about the many moral issues that the story raises.

As a movie, it's not bad.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By harpoon guns to 'safe', please on 26 July 2014
Format: DVD
I rather think this was as good as Hollywood could do with this one, particularly if aiming for this certificate (though Transformers made a 12, and with that language, I remain amazed, though it's otherwise suitable only for the under sixes). I always felt the book to be a rather adult book with kids in it, and this definitely moves more towards the kids than does the book.

However, it is a very entertaining movie. Most of the key themes from the book, including the final battle and aftermath are there, if toned down. The bullying and outsider themes that made such an impact on many of us are still there, and the effects all you could want. The battle room in particular is well-realised, though some sequences I'd have liked to see were missing.

Pretty much all of the cast and characterisation are fit for purpose, Ford and Kingsley reliable as ever, Asa Butterfield fine again, but I felt the sergeant was feeble- straight out of "The Sarah Jane Adventures" or that lost non-classic "Five Go To Boot Camp."

Still, overall, an enjoyable, perhaps languid, but never too slow, passable adaptation of a fine novel; one that will deserve another watch.

A job well done.
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By bernie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Feb. 2014
Format: Blu-ray
It may still become a miniseries. At least they need to make "Speaker for the Dead"; then we can see a better balanced rendition of what Orson Scott Card is trying to say to us.

As with many movies there is not enough time to portray or even imply what the book tells us. Tee best we can hope for is a good reflection and not let the movie change the story for its own ends. This is one of those movies that tried in the time allotted to give you not only the feel but to put in as many details as possible.

The choice of actors did a pretty good match to the characters. The graphics did not overwhelm the story. The background music did not washout the dialog. Unfortunately the version I watched did not have a voice over commentary to add to the experience. We view the story as a third party and never really get into anyone's mind.

To many readers it will never be justified. To people that have not read the book it may be obscure. But at least they did not try to make a different story out of it. I am trying to restrain myself from comparing this film to classic sci-fi stories. To the movie's credit they did not dwell on the technology. The story here is about people and societies that just happen to take place in the future.

Basic story is that it looks like we have been attacked a nearly annihilated. Our only recourse is to do unto others before they do it unto us. We do not know their intentions but take no chances. In the military we are always taught that no two wars are the same; we can train but must be flexible and initiative. The primes here are that children are more flexible and amendable to new environments.

We are left with a moral question. This question will be better developed in the next book and hopefully the next film.
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