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Encyclopedia Of Psychoactive Substances Paperback – 22 Jul 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus; New Ed edition (22 July 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349111278
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349111278
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.8 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 962,952 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Richard Rudgley is a critically acclaimed author and TV presenter whose books have been translated into twelve languages. He was born in Hampshire, England in 1961. After receiving a first class degree in Social Anthropology and Religious Studies at the University of London, he continued his studies in ethnology, museum ethnography and prehistory at the University of Oxford. In 1991 he became the first winner of the British Museum Prometheus Award which resulted in the publication of his first book, The Alchemy of Culture: Intoxicants in Society. His equally well-received book, The Encyclopaedia of Psychoactive Substances, was published in 1998. In the same year his book Lost Civilisations of the Stone Age presented overwhelming evidence that the historical civilisations owed a much greater cultural debt to their prehistoric ancestors than is generally accepted.

He has written and presented several documentaries that have aired on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom and the History Channel internationally, including Secrets of the Stone Age, Barbarians and Pagans. He also wrote books to accompany the former two. In 2006, he published Pagan Resurrection: A Force for Evil or the Future of Western Spirituality? which describes the various ways the archetypes of Northern European mythology have re-emerged in the Western psyche. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and a member of the Asatru Folk Assembly.

Arktos has recently republished his books The Alchemy of Culture, which is about the history of intoxicants in Western civilisation; Wildest Dreams: An Anthology of Drug-Related Literature, which collects writings both ancient and modern describing the drug experience; and Barbarians, which is about the Dark Ages.

Product Description

Review

Fascinating (LOADED)

... tobacco, ground beetles, glue, coffee, Prozac and so on ... Rudgley concentrates with startling results, on the history of the use of such substances (GUARDIAN)

a enjoyable anthology of drugs, from opium and LSD to giraffe livers. (MARIE CLAIRE)

A thorough and entertaining reference text (NEW SCIENTIST)

Formidable ... Rudgley's curiosity, distilled concentration, inter-disciplinary connectiveness, deadpan humour, prodigious reading, magpie eclecticism and anecdotal ease are all massively appealing (EVENING STANDARD)

This really is a fun read ... there are great little bits of information, such as the one about Eton schoolboys being flogged in the 17th century if they forgot to bring their tobacco pipes to school (Will Self, NEW STATESMAN)

Will deeply satisfy the curious ... impressive (Nicholas Lezard, MODERN REVIEW)

Fascinating ... Suddenly, clubland seems tame (ESQUIRE)

Rare and unusual is an encyclopaedia that you can read from cover to cover without wanting to put it down ... Richard Rudgley's book is one of those rarities ... fascinating, funny, informative and provocative (LITERARY REVIEW)

A gold-leaf reference book (ATTITUDE)

A perfect psychonaut's guide to a strange galaxy ... a brilliant index to the weird and wonderful and a timely reminder that ours is not an unusually reckless age (FRANK)

Book Description

*An accessible and vastly entertaining book on drugs from Ecstasy to caffeine via toad-spittle.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Sept. 2000
Format: Paperback
This isn't drug use manual, you won't any notes on the preparation and dosage of any of the substances in the book. However as a quick reference guide to the history and customs surrounding any number of obscure and not so obscure drugs it is invaulable. In it you will find anything from the potential of the goat fish to cause nightmares to the history of glue sniffing and an analysis of our habitiual use of caffiene.
Rudgely does't make any judgements as to the morality of drug use, instead he presents the simple facts whilst avoiding anthropological jargon. The one glaring omission is alcohol which only recieves a passing reference but the book doesn't suffer for it. Well worth a read for anyone with more than a passing interest in the subject be they parents, users or anthropolgy students.
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By ronnie on 26 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book matched the seller's description, and as such is worth the money i paid. The packaging was adequate for a book and it arrived one day ahead of time.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Makes for interesting reading for anyone with a casual interest in the subject.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Great Encyclopedia 10 Mar. 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Takes a look at not only common drugs, plants, and animals, yes animals, used for psychoactive experiences, but more importantly, it gives a very impressive view of obscure substances that most other 'drug encyclopedias', that cost about the same price or more, don't even mention.
This is the book to get if you want to learn more about the substances that you don't see in the news everyday, but in many cases have been used for hundreds, if not thousands of years.
It looks at the more common drugs used in society today (LSD, Ecstasy, Marijuana, etc.) but its real value is that of a gap filler in most peoples drug knowledge.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Just a brief history, no real information. 6 Mar. 2014
By Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While the book does cover a lot of substances, it doesn't really tell you about the substances themselves. What it gives you is a very brief description and a few paragraphs on its history. There is very little to no info on how there taken(aside from "it's smoked" or it's eaten"), how much is taken, or what the effects are past a one or maybe two sentence description.

Maybe it was an interesting book in the 90's but it is greatly lacking in both knowledge and substance. The thing that upset me the most is the fact that everything in the book is just a compilation of copied and regurgitated basic information. It reads like someone made a list of substances, copied a few paragraph, and called it a book. It doesn't seem like the author has any real knowledge or wisdom about the subject or that he has every even tried any psycho active substances.
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