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Empire Burlesque CD


Price: £4.79 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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BOB DYLAN Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Bob Dylan's influence on popular music is incalculable. As a songwriter, he pioneered several different schools of pop songwriting, from confessional singer/songwriter to winding, hallucinatory, stream-of-consciousness narratives. As a vocalist, he broke down the notion that a singer must have a conventionally good voice in order to ... Read more in Amazon's Bob Dylan Store

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Empire Burlesque + Knocked Out Loaded + Shot Of Love
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Product details

  • Audio CD (4 Feb 1991)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Sony Music Cmg
  • ASIN: B000025RLO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,792 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Tight Connection To My Heart (Has Anyone Seen My Love)
2. Seeing The Real You At Last
3. I'll Remember You
4. Clean Cut Kid
5. Never Gonna The Same Again
6. Trust Yourself
7. Emotionally Yours
8. When The Night Comes Falling From The Sky
9. "Something's Burning, Baby"
10. Dark Eyes

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By street-legal on 18 Feb 2012
Format: Audio CD
For a long time, I found this album almost unlistenable and thought Arthur Baker was a pariah for splashing so much pointless crap over Bob Dylan songs. As was the trend at the time, the drums are mixed way too high and sound like somebody bashing an empty cardboard box with a wooden spoon; either that or those new-fangled electronic drums that sound like 'douche!' every time they're hit.
Dylan wasn't on his own. Just about every artiste who emerged in the sixties were releasing albums that sounded like this; Neil Young, Eric Clapton, John Martyn et al. This was either corporate pressure for saleable product, or a genuine desire to sound so. In Dylan's case, I reckon it was the former. But time can do strange things to music, and the 80's don't sound quite as dated as they did ten years ago, quixotic as that sounds.
The album itself was quite a long, drawn out process, so it is a shame that only about half of the songs are what you might call 'good Dylan'. A handful are actually very good indeed, including Tight Connection, Seeing The Real You At Last and the surprising all-acoustic closer, Dark Eyes. Given the price you can pick it up for these days, its worth getting for these songs alone. One song really grates, though....When The Night Comes Falling. Particularly so after hearing the version on Bootleg Series Vol 3, which is excellent. The version on Empire Burlesque is a horrible Frankenstein's monster of a song, the aural equivalent of somebody rattling a money tin right up to your ear.
It is not a truly bad album, but it isn't great either. I would recommend for those who applaud it wholeheartedly to listen to Highway 61 Revisted again for a reality check.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Jervis VINE VOICE on 3 Sep 2006
Format: Audio CD
Although it's fair to say all well established artists should have their own well defined style/priniples when it comes to the creative process, the mid - eighties was a very strange time generally on the music front. Bob Dylan's own brand of singer/songwriter ideals at the time was deeply unfashionable and like Mick Jagger, Neil Young and Lou Reed he felt the only way for his music to be heard was to make concessions to the contemporary sounds of the day. The fact that Bob was not on top form in a songwriting sense at that time anyway may be purely coincidental or as a result of feeling completely at odds with the musical climate of the time. Producer Arthur Baker's sound and the general eighties instrumentation was quite uncompatable when revealing the true strengths of Bob's talent.
The opening and closing tracks are my favourites 'Tight Connection To My Heart' and 'Dark Eyes' although the first song was far more effective in its original form when demoed for 'Infidels' as 'Someone's Got A Hold Of My Heart'. It's not necessarily a truly bad album but it is a piece of works which fails to reflect those things that make Bob a unique artist.
'Empire Burlesque' is probably at its most enjoyable if the listener is unaware of Bob's pedigree - it can then be listened to on its own terms and perhaps be occasionally enjoyed.
Unfortunately 'Empire' represented the beginning of a very uninspiring period for Bob in which he'd release 'Knocked Out Loaded', 'Down In The Groove' and the live 'Dylan And The Dead'.
Really though 'Empire Burlesque' is merely a symptom of its time when Bob decided it was probably best to stop swimming against the tide. When the musical landscape changed somewhat in the nineties and singer/songwriters and more traditional sounds were more accepted again Bob once again returned to what he does best and released some cracking albums.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sir Graphus on 26 Jun 2014
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps Bob listened to Neil Young's "Landing on Water" and thought, hey, I could make a record this bad.

It seems synthesizers completely foxed several guitar based artists of the 60s and 70s; how could they react to them, incorporate them into their sounds? In hindsight, the answer was to simply let them pass. That wasn't obvious at the time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 31 Aug 2012
Format: Audio CD
This 1985 album is the twenty-third from icon Bob Dylan. It comes right in the middle of a run of less than impressive albums that ran from 1979's `Slow Train Coming', and ended in 1997 with `Time Out Of Mind', with only the brief respite of 1989's `Oh Mercy'. In fact this album marks the start of a run of three albums that I rate as the worst of Dylan's career.

Following 1983's `Infidels', where Dylan had managed to update his sound, though had failed to marry that with any interesting songwriting, here he went the whole hog and embraced the worst of the eighties with lots of synthesizers and drum machines in evidence. It makes the music very detached and soulless. Added to which, Dylan just hasn't written any interesting songs. Or if they have then they are smothered in overproduction. Another cardinal sin is that his second greatest asset (after his writing) his distinctive voice is totally lost in the mix. It's an uninteresting, soulless and totally forgettable album. Having listened a few times there are no tracks that have lodged in my mind. Even `Self Portrait' had a couple of genius tracks, here there is nothing for me. One star only, this was the real nadir of his career for me.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mike London on 2 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD
EMPIRE BURLESQUE is a terrific album. But before I tell you my own impression, let me tell you what helped shape this impression. I use AllMusic Guide a lot, and this record is the one that's rated the highest of the 1980s, earning 4 1/2 stars out of 5, above INFIDELS (4 stars) and OH MERCY (3), and on level with TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGIN' as well as DESIRE. So I went in expecting a lot. A lot is what I got.

The followup to the 1983 Infidels, EB is, song for song, one of the strongest albums in Dylan's latter days. Much like Street-Legal, EB has some very slick production (though of a much different kind than Street Legal). This has long been a sore spot for Dylan fans and music critics, claiming the record has very dated 1980s production style, and several have had some unkind remarks about EB's producer, Arthur Baker. While it is true the production is very slick, it suits the music well. I'd argue this is simply the most well-constructed album Dylan wrote in the 1980s, bettering OH MERCY and INFIDELS, his two other major works from that decade. All of the music sounds of one piece, and meant to be played together.

Two of the songs were originally recorded for INFIDELS. The first was "Clean Cut Kid," which Dylan did not finish until the EB sessions. The second was "Someone's Got a Hold of My Heart," which was reworked into the opening cut for EB and retitled "Tight Connection to My Heart." While there is a significant group of fans who claim the earlier versions (including the unreleased outtake that is widely circulating in collector circles) is the better version, I've always preferred the EB version. It has always been a particular favorite of mine ever since I got into Dylan several years ago.
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