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Emotional Intelligence Paperback – 27 Sep 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Books; 10 Anv edition (27 Sept. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055338371X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553383713
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2 x 20.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 313,043 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Daniel Goleman, PhD, covers the behavioural and brain sciences for the New York Times and his articles appear throughout the world in syndication. His latest book, Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama, was published in January 2003. He has taught at Harvard (where he received his PhD) and was formerly senior editor at Psychology Today. His previous books include Vital Lies, Simple Truths; The Meditative Mind; and as co-author, The Creative Spirit. He was also a contributor to the business reference work, Business: The Ultimate Resource.

Product Description

Amazon Review

There was a time when IQ was considered the leading determinant of success. In this fascinating book, based on brain and behavioural research, Daniel Goleman argues that our IQ- idolising view of intelligence is far too narrow. Instead, Goleman makes the case for "emotional intelligence" being the strongest indicator of human success. He defines emotional intelligence in terms of self-awareness, altruism, personal motivation, empathy and the ability to love and be loved by friends, partners, and family members. People who possess high emotional intelligence are the people who truly succeed in work as well as play, building flourishing careers and lasting, meaningful relationships. Because emotional intelligence isn't fixed at birth, Goleman outlines how adults as well as parents of young children can sow the seeds. --Amazon.com --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Review

'A well-written and pratical guide to emotions, perfectly pitched in tone and scope' -- Finacial Times

'An impressive arguement that excellence is more than IQ' -- Daily Mail --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

86 of 90 people found the following review helpful By Layla Halabi on 20 Dec. 2005
Format: Paperback
Daniel Goleman is, of course, the man who popularized emotional intelligence. His book is an excellent blend of science, anecdotal and real-life examples as well as some suggestions for improvement. However, this book is written as an introduction of the topic of emotional intelligence, it is NOT a how-to and it is not a solution to all our life's problems.
The book focuses on building emotional intelligence in children, especially school age. This makes it an ideal read for parents and educators who deal with children between the ages of 3 and 10. In fact, I would say it is VITAL reading for parents since it will probably save the parents, and the children of course, years of agony and heartache.
The Book is very well written but don't expect it to solve all your emotional intelligence problems. If you want a more practical and useful guide, especially for developing emotional intelligence in the workplace, read Goleman's 'Working with Emotional Intelligence.'
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96 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 28 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
Ever since I read Martin Gardiner's book on multiple intelligences, I have been intrigued by the study of how we learn and the different types of intelligence. No one disputes that mathematical/analytical brain-power is a very different type of intelligence from the kind of bodily intelligence that makes someone a graceful gymnast or a super athlete; while there is often some cross-over between the kinds of intelligence that make for good mathematicians and good musicians, the kinds of intelligence that are brought to bear on different parts of our lives get developed in different ways.
One of the more controversial and overlooked types of intelligence is Emotional Intelligence. I do not agree with the idea that one's EQ is in some way opposite from the IQ, the standard intelligence quotient idea (which in and of itself is calculated and reliant on different criteria depending upon the test). I don't believe that Goleman ever makes such a dramatic claim as to show a precise inverse relationship between the EQ and IQ. He does show that there are different kinds of difficulties that can arise, and that a high IQ does not necessarily (or even often) translate into a high EQ.
After a brief introduction exploring the general issues of intelligence and the power of emotions, Goleman
looks at new discoveries in brain anatomy and architecture, particularly as it pertains to what happens when emotions `take over'. The second, and longest, section of the book looks at the nature of Emotional Intelligence. This is being able to understand oneself as well as others, being able to control emotions (or not), and drawing on Aristotle's phrase from the Nicomachean Ethics, being able to have the right degree of emotion at the right time for the right reason for the right duration.
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148 of 156 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
I read this book first time years ago and thought it to be one of the must books to have in ones book shelf to get back to time and time again. Now I am in a situation where my long term relationship is in great difficulties. For some reason I started reading this book and it was shocking to see how typical our situation is. It is a real eye opener of how people get overtaken by their emotions and how this can lead into behavioural circle where things go bad to worse. I highly recommend this book to anyone in the path of self development or just for understanding of fellow human being. And especially for us who have children it is a must read so we can help them develop better emotional skills for their future.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mr. C. J. O'hanlon on 2 July 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is very good at emphasising how important emotional intelligence is, and after hearing all the evidence the author gives, it is hard to disagree. However there is absolutely no information on how we can improve our eq at all. I consider myself to be someone in need of a higher eq. listening to this just made me think yeah I wish I had some of that, but I don't. If you do have a high eq you will probably like this book because it make you feel pretty smug.
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51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 9 Feb. 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Ever since I read Martin Gardiner's book on multiple intelligences, I have been intrigued by the study of how we learn and the different types of intelligence. No one disputes that mathematical/analytical brain-power is a very different type of intelligence from the kind of bodily intelligence that makes someone a graceful gymnast or a super athlete; while there is often some cross-over between the kinds of intelligence that make for good mathematicians and good musicians, the kinds of intelligence that are brought to bear on different parts of our lives get developed in different ways.
One of the more controversial and overlooked types of intelligence is Emotional Intelligence. I do not agree with the idea that one's EQ is in some way opposite from the IQ, the standard intelligence quotient idea (which in and of itself is calculated and reliant on different criteria depending upon the test). I don't believe that Goleman ever makes such a dramatic claim as to show a precise inverse relationship between the EQ and IQ. He does show that there are different kinds of difficulties that can arise, and that a high IQ does not necessarily (or even often) translate into a high EQ.
After a brief introduction exploring the general issues of intelligence and the power of emotions, Goleman
looks at new discoveries in brain anatomy and architecture, particularly as it pertains to what happens when emotions 'take over'. The second, and longest, section of the book looks at the nature of Emotional Intelligence. This is being able to understand oneself as well as others, being able to control emotions (or not), and drawing on Aristotle's phrase from the Nicomachean Ethics, being able to have the right degree of emotion at the right time for the right reason for the right duration.
Read more ›
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