Elvis Presley


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"There have been pretenders. And there have been contenders. But there is only one king.” - @springsteen http://t.co/YOpDrO1iuj


At a Glance

Birthname: Elvis Aaron Presley
Nationality: American
Born: Jan 08 1935
Died: Aug 16 1977 (42 years old)


Biography

Elvis Aaron Presley is one of the biggest-selling artists of all-time, but mere numbers cannot begin to explain the colossal cultural impact he had in the mid-20th Century. He was a central figure in the transformation of the grey, conservative 50s into the technicolor 60s through the liberalizing effect of rock and pop music. Frank Sinatra had proved extremely popular in the 40s with young adults, but Elvis attracted teenagers who had money for the first time because of the post-war economic boom. In doing so, the 'teenager' became a real concept for music-makers, a market to aim for that ... Read more

Elvis Aaron Presley is one of the biggest-selling artists of all-time, but mere numbers cannot begin to explain the colossal cultural impact he had in the mid-20th Century. He was a central figure in the transformation of the grey, conservative 50s into the technicolor 60s through the liberalizing effect of rock and pop music. Frank Sinatra had proved extremely popular in the 40s with young adults, but Elvis attracted teenagers who had money for the first time because of the post-war economic boom. In doing so, the 'teenager' became a real concept for music-makers, a market to aim for that revolutionized the dominant style of music from the easy-listening croons of Sinatra and Bing Crosby to the new and varied styles of rock'n'roll. His on-stage hip-shaking was hugely controversial among worried parents, who labeled him a danger to American society while their teenage daughters swooned at such flagrant sexuality. His innovative music was rooted in country but with an added rhythm & blues sound and beat strongly associated with black American music. Elvis' teenage fans ignored the old-fashioned concept of racially segregating musical styles, a crucial first-step towards acceptance of blacks by young white America that enabled the civil rights movement of the 60s to succeed. The teenagers who were inspired by Elvis in the 50s grew into the young adults of the liberal 60s, and the pop, rock and film stars who effected further cultural progress in that decade. More so than any other individual person, Elvis was a catalyst to the social changes that put light-years between today's broad-minded attitudes and the conservative social norms of five decades ago.

As Van Gogh blended paint, Elvis revolutionized American music forever by blending previously distinct roots genres. Elvis fused traditionally 'white' country with traditionally 'black' R&B, creating a new sound that impacted culture in countless ways. He also infused a gospel influence into the music, giving it a wild exuberance and energy, demonstrating uninhibited self-expression. DJs refused to play Elvis's first recording, "That's Alright Mama," because white radio stations said it was black music and black stations said it was white music. Soon after, "Hound Dog" hit No.1 on the pop, R&B [i]and[/i] country charts. He became a national and worldwide phenomenon with other hits like "Heartbreak Hotel," "All Shook Up," and "Jailhouse Rock." Music had previously been upright and polite, but Elvis seemed to shout to the world that it was okay to "cut loose," and everyone followed suit.

Not everyone was a fan: there was national outrage over his uninhibited movement on stage, that some saw as "obscene gyrations," and his black/white style of music outraged many and stirred controversy. This uproar served to stoke the fires of curiosity among young listeners, which likely only increased his popularity and opened the floodgates to a more liberal society.

In 1956 Elvis commenced an acting career in the movie Love Me Tender, which was then briefly put on hold when he was summoned to serve with the US Army in 1958. Throughout the 60s he starred in many films that tended to feature cute, pop musical numbers and wafer-thin plots. The movies were panned by critics, but die-hard fans continued to buy millions of soundtracks and Elvis was the highest paid actor in Hollywood throughout the 60s. Many today view "Elvis movies" as time capsules of a unique and carefree time marked by innocence, romance, lighthearted humor, and of course music. However, the L.A. Times probably summed up Elvis's movie career fairly by noting that: "His stirring musical vision -- his daring and imaginative blend of country, gospel, R&B and rock 'n' roll -- rarely found an analogous expression in the thirty-one narrative films he made in Hollywood.”

Ironically, by the late 60s Elvis was seen by many as too clean cut, and his music as irrelevant in comparison to the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix. In 1968 he made a live appearance on NBC that was later referred to as his 'comeback special,' as it reinvigorated his career. His new songs were far superior to most of the material he had been given in the 60s, and made him a critical and commercial success again. He resumed touring, playing nearly 1200 shows between 1969 and his eventual death in 1977, many during famous residencies in Las Vegas. When he was on form, his shows were spectacular and frequently won him praise and admiration from old fans and new. However, during the 70s Elvis's overall condition declined, and by 1977 his live performances were becoming erratic. On August 16, Elvis Presley was found dead on the floor of his Graceland mansion. Years of prescription drug misuse and poor dietary habits, as well as hereditary illnesses, caused him a fatal heart attack.

Since his death, Elvis's worldwide iconic stature has never faltered. According to Life Magazine, Elvis's image has graced the stamp of over 51 countries. Even 33 years after his death there are annual celebrations and festivals throughout the world honoring him, and there are thousands of Elvis impersonators who regularly perform. In fact, many fans refuse to believe that he ever died. The line first used to settle down an unruly crowd -- "Elvis has left the building" -- is often used in reverse to depict his ongoing popularity: "Elvis has never left the building".

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Elvis Aaron Presley is one of the biggest-selling artists of all-time, but mere numbers cannot begin to explain the colossal cultural impact he had in the mid-20th Century. He was a central figure in the transformation of the grey, conservative 50s into the technicolor 60s through the liberalizing effect of rock and pop music. Frank Sinatra had proved extremely popular in the 40s with young adults, but Elvis attracted teenagers who had money for the first time because of the post-war economic boom. In doing so, the 'teenager' became a real concept for music-makers, a market to aim for that revolutionized the dominant style of music from the easy-listening croons of Sinatra and Bing Crosby to the new and varied styles of rock'n'roll. His on-stage hip-shaking was hugely controversial among worried parents, who labeled him a danger to American society while their teenage daughters swooned at such flagrant sexuality. His innovative music was rooted in country but with an added rhythm & blues sound and beat strongly associated with black American music. Elvis' teenage fans ignored the old-fashioned concept of racially segregating musical styles, a crucial first-step towards acceptance of blacks by young white America that enabled the civil rights movement of the 60s to succeed. The teenagers who were inspired by Elvis in the 50s grew into the young adults of the liberal 60s, and the pop, rock and film stars who effected further cultural progress in that decade. More so than any other individual person, Elvis was a catalyst to the social changes that put light-years between today's broad-minded attitudes and the conservative social norms of five decades ago.

As Van Gogh blended paint, Elvis revolutionized American music forever by blending previously distinct roots genres. Elvis fused traditionally 'white' country with traditionally 'black' R&B, creating a new sound that impacted culture in countless ways. He also infused a gospel influence into the music, giving it a wild exuberance and energy, demonstrating uninhibited self-expression. DJs refused to play Elvis's first recording, "That's Alright Mama," because white radio stations said it was black music and black stations said it was white music. Soon after, "Hound Dog" hit No.1 on the pop, R&B [i]and[/i] country charts. He became a national and worldwide phenomenon with other hits like "Heartbreak Hotel," "All Shook Up," and "Jailhouse Rock." Music had previously been upright and polite, but Elvis seemed to shout to the world that it was okay to "cut loose," and everyone followed suit.

Not everyone was a fan: there was national outrage over his uninhibited movement on stage, that some saw as "obscene gyrations," and his black/white style of music outraged many and stirred controversy. This uproar served to stoke the fires of curiosity among young listeners, which likely only increased his popularity and opened the floodgates to a more liberal society.

In 1956 Elvis commenced an acting career in the movie Love Me Tender, which was then briefly put on hold when he was summoned to serve with the US Army in 1958. Throughout the 60s he starred in many films that tended to feature cute, pop musical numbers and wafer-thin plots. The movies were panned by critics, but die-hard fans continued to buy millions of soundtracks and Elvis was the highest paid actor in Hollywood throughout the 60s. Many today view "Elvis movies" as time capsules of a unique and carefree time marked by innocence, romance, lighthearted humor, and of course music. However, the L.A. Times probably summed up Elvis's movie career fairly by noting that: "His stirring musical vision -- his daring and imaginative blend of country, gospel, R&B and rock 'n' roll -- rarely found an analogous expression in the thirty-one narrative films he made in Hollywood.”

Ironically, by the late 60s Elvis was seen by many as too clean cut, and his music as irrelevant in comparison to the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix. In 1968 he made a live appearance on NBC that was later referred to as his 'comeback special,' as it reinvigorated his career. His new songs were far superior to most of the material he had been given in the 60s, and made him a critical and commercial success again. He resumed touring, playing nearly 1200 shows between 1969 and his eventual death in 1977, many during famous residencies in Las Vegas. When he was on form, his shows were spectacular and frequently won him praise and admiration from old fans and new. However, during the 70s Elvis's overall condition declined, and by 1977 his live performances were becoming erratic. On August 16, Elvis Presley was found dead on the floor of his Graceland mansion. Years of prescription drug misuse and poor dietary habits, as well as hereditary illnesses, caused him a fatal heart attack.

Since his death, Elvis's worldwide iconic stature has never faltered. According to Life Magazine, Elvis's image has graced the stamp of over 51 countries. Even 33 years after his death there are annual celebrations and festivals throughout the world honoring him, and there are thousands of Elvis impersonators who regularly perform. In fact, many fans refuse to believe that he ever died. The line first used to settle down an unruly crowd -- "Elvis has left the building" -- is often used in reverse to depict his ongoing popularity: "Elvis has never left the building".

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Elvis Aaron Presley is one of the biggest-selling artists of all-time, but mere numbers cannot begin to explain the colossal cultural impact he had in the mid-20th Century. He was a central figure in the transformation of the grey, conservative 50s into the technicolor 60s through the liberalizing effect of rock and pop music. Frank Sinatra had proved extremely popular in the 40s with young adults, but Elvis attracted teenagers who had money for the first time because of the post-war economic boom. In doing so, the 'teenager' became a real concept for music-makers, a market to aim for that revolutionized the dominant style of music from the easy-listening croons of Sinatra and Bing Crosby to the new and varied styles of rock'n'roll. His on-stage hip-shaking was hugely controversial among worried parents, who labeled him a danger to American society while their teenage daughters swooned at such flagrant sexuality. His innovative music was rooted in country but with an added rhythm & blues sound and beat strongly associated with black American music. Elvis' teenage fans ignored the old-fashioned concept of racially segregating musical styles, a crucial first-step towards acceptance of blacks by young white America that enabled the civil rights movement of the 60s to succeed. The teenagers who were inspired by Elvis in the 50s grew into the young adults of the liberal 60s, and the pop, rock and film stars who effected further cultural progress in that decade. More so than any other individual person, Elvis was a catalyst to the social changes that put light-years between today's broad-minded attitudes and the conservative social norms of five decades ago.

As Van Gogh blended paint, Elvis revolutionized American music forever by blending previously distinct roots genres. Elvis fused traditionally 'white' country with traditionally 'black' R&B, creating a new sound that impacted culture in countless ways. He also infused a gospel influence into the music, giving it a wild exuberance and energy, demonstrating uninhibited self-expression. DJs refused to play Elvis's first recording, "That's Alright Mama," because white radio stations said it was black music and black stations said it was white music. Soon after, "Hound Dog" hit No.1 on the pop, R&B [i]and[/i] country charts. He became a national and worldwide phenomenon with other hits like "Heartbreak Hotel," "All Shook Up," and "Jailhouse Rock." Music had previously been upright and polite, but Elvis seemed to shout to the world that it was okay to "cut loose," and everyone followed suit.

Not everyone was a fan: there was national outrage over his uninhibited movement on stage, that some saw as "obscene gyrations," and his black/white style of music outraged many and stirred controversy. This uproar served to stoke the fires of curiosity among young listeners, which likely only increased his popularity and opened the floodgates to a more liberal society.

In 1956 Elvis commenced an acting career in the movie Love Me Tender, which was then briefly put on hold when he was summoned to serve with the US Army in 1958. Throughout the 60s he starred in many films that tended to feature cute, pop musical numbers and wafer-thin plots. The movies were panned by critics, but die-hard fans continued to buy millions of soundtracks and Elvis was the highest paid actor in Hollywood throughout the 60s. Many today view "Elvis movies" as time capsules of a unique and carefree time marked by innocence, romance, lighthearted humor, and of course music. However, the L.A. Times probably summed up Elvis's movie career fairly by noting that: "His stirring musical vision -- his daring and imaginative blend of country, gospel, R&B and rock 'n' roll -- rarely found an analogous expression in the thirty-one narrative films he made in Hollywood.”

Ironically, by the late 60s Elvis was seen by many as too clean cut, and his music as irrelevant in comparison to the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix. In 1968 he made a live appearance on NBC that was later referred to as his 'comeback special,' as it reinvigorated his career. His new songs were far superior to most of the material he had been given in the 60s, and made him a critical and commercial success again. He resumed touring, playing nearly 1200 shows between 1969 and his eventual death in 1977, many during famous residencies in Las Vegas. When he was on form, his shows were spectacular and frequently won him praise and admiration from old fans and new. However, during the 70s Elvis's overall condition declined, and by 1977 his live performances were becoming erratic. On August 16, Elvis Presley was found dead on the floor of his Graceland mansion. Years of prescription drug misuse and poor dietary habits, as well as hereditary illnesses, caused him a fatal heart attack.

Since his death, Elvis's worldwide iconic stature has never faltered. According to Life Magazine, Elvis's image has graced the stamp of over 51 countries. Even 33 years after his death there are annual celebrations and festivals throughout the world honoring him, and there are thousands of Elvis impersonators who regularly perform. In fact, many fans refuse to believe that he ever died. The line first used to settle down an unruly crowd -- "Elvis has left the building" -- is often used in reverse to depict his ongoing popularity: "Elvis has never left the building".

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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