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4.4 out of 5 stars24
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 31 May 1999
I love Eloise!!! Eloise in Paris is my favorite Eloise book. What's really fun are those long made up words such as "zuk zuk zhwocky zuk zuk nnnn" for their Plaza telephone. With the "charming" six year old as the star, this book is about how a rich girl spends time in Paris with Nanny, Skipperdee (Turtle), Weenie (dog), and Koki (chauffeur). It's very creative; all of Kay Thompson's books are. I read the first Eloise book to a bunch of friends in my college dorm, and I only got past four or five pages because they were all saying, "C'mon, Hilary!!! That's enough!" I also went through this phase a year or so ago where I sent E-Mails saying: "The Bell Captain Knows Who I am!" which left most of my friends perplexed. I remember the response of one friend: "That's really great, but who's the Bell Captain?" It's quite odd because books can create all sorts of situations for people. The funny words or phrases can start jokes as well. One of my friends and I thought it was weird that Eloise said that paper cups were good for talking to Mars, and we sometimes say on the phone to eachother, "have you talked to Mars yet?"
From the viewpoint of a Beatnik, Eloise In Paris and all the rest of the books about her are some of the beatest kids books I've seen!
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on 10 May 1999
Eliose in Paris, what a kick. But the dark side of this book is that this poor rich child is neglected by her mother and her father is never mentioned. Is he merely a dead beat dad or dead? Eliose doesn't seem to care. Perhaps her acting out with inappropriate behaviour is merely a way of expressing her anger at the neglect by her parents? Her drawing on her walls a deep cry for help?
Nah! Of course that's all 90's physico-babble. This book was written in the 50's when no one thought twice about giving the care of children to hired help. Eliose of course rebells and seeks attention and even us involved parents see these antics. A quick trip to Paris will solve all your problems. There is nothing like fishing in the river, visiting museums or a picnic in the park to make one's cares go away.
My girls loved it. -gary-
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J'Aime Beaucoup Eloise! December 11, 2000
"Je suis Me ELOISE"
Think of this book as a combination French lesson and tour guide to Paris and Versailles, conducted by the inimitable Eloise. You've never had such fun! This book will be appealing to all of those who loved Eloise when they were chronologically young and are still young at heart. The book is a worthy sequel to the original Eloise by patterning the story as much as possible after the first book. Whether you have been to Paris or not, you will be delighted!
A cablegram comes from Eloise's mother, and Eloise practically knocks the Plaza to its knees to get it. Then Nanny has to hold it far away to read the message. Eloise's mother wants them to come to Paris to get roses in their cheeks. Eloise telephones everyone at the Plaza to let them know she is going. There are many things to do including shopping, passports, vaccinations, and packing. Pretty soon they are on their way with 37 pieces of luggage. "Everyone knew we were going, but no one cried."
Eloise, Nanny, Weenie (the pug), and Skipperdee (the turtle) fly by Sabena to Belgium (because it's the only airline that lets turtles fly with the people). From there, they take a helicopter to Paris. They are met there by Koki, the chauffeur of mother's lawyer. He takes them to the Relais Bisson, which is the only place Eloise stays in Paris. It is near the Seine so they can get the salty smell from the air. Mme. and M. Dupuis greet them.
. . . But the Realais Bisson is not the Plaza. There is no elevator. The room is small. Eloise knows that she has to get outside to have a good time. And she sure does. But at night, she manages some of her usual fun by visiting all the rooms . . . just to make a few adjustments.
Among her many exciting outside events are having a dress designed for her by M. Dior, dinner at Maxim's ("My mother knows Maxim" . . . and yes, she does charge the meal there.), and visits to every possible monument and public place. Along the way, she finds a novel use for French bread that I'll bet you never have tried. The scenes in Paris and Versailles are beautifully drawn by Hilary Knight in the original Eloise style. You'll love them.
The book could easily double as a French language lesson. Eloise explains all kinds of french nouns and adjectives that are useful to travelers in a way that makes them easy to remember.
"Oh I absolutely miss the Plaza" and then it's time to go back. This time she has 114 pieces of luggage. "J'aime beaucoup le Plaza" is her first comment upon returning.
I think a hidden blessing of this book is that it will kindle an irresistible urge to visit Paris. If you read the book to your children when they are young, you will probably have an easier time recruiting them as traveling companions for a wonderful family vacation in France.
If you already know French, you will also enjoy little jokes that are included in that language. If you do not know French, you'll still enjoy the book very much.
After you have finished enjoying this wonderful book, I suggest that you think about how you can take a trip that will cause you to change your usual life style . . . so that you learn new ways of thinking about life, as well as seeing new sights.
Vive la France! Vive Eloise!
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"Je suis Me ELOISE"
Think of this book as a combination French lesson and tour guide to Paris and Versailles, conducted by the inimitable Eloise. You've never had such fun! This book will be appealing to all of those who loved Eloise when they were chronologically young and are still young at heart. The book is a worthy sequel to the original Eloise by patterning the story as much as possible after the first book. Whether you have been to Paris or not, you will be delighted!
A cablegram comes from Eloise's mother, and Eloise practically knocks the Plaza to its knees to get it. Then Nanny has to hold it far away to read the message. Eloise's mother wants them to come to Paris to get roses in their cheeks. Eloise telephones everyone at the Plaza to let them know she is going. There are many things to do including shopping, passports, vaccinations, and packing. Pretty soon they are on their way with 37 pieces of luggage. "Everyone knew we were going, but no one cried."
Eloise, Nanny, Weenie (the pug), and Skipperdee (the turtle) fly by Sabena to Belgium (because it's the only airline that lets turtles fly with the people). From there, they take a helicopter to Paris. They are met there by Koki, the chauffeur of mother's lawyer. He takes them to the Relais Bisson, which is the only place Eloise stays in Paris. It is near the Seine so they can get the salty smell from the air. Mme. and M. Dupuis greet them.
. . . But the Realais Bisson is not the Plaza. There is no elevator. The room is small. Eloise knows that she has to get outside to have a good time. And she sure does. But at night, she manages some of her usual fun by visiting all the rooms . . . just to make a few adjustments.
Among her many exciting outside events are having a dress designed for her by M. Dior, dinner at Maxim's ("My mother knows Maxim" . . . and yes, she does charge the meal there.), and visits to every possible monument and public place. Along the way, she finds a novel use for French bread that I'll bet you never have tried. The scenes in Paris and Versailles are beautifully drawn by Hilary Knight in the original Eloise style. You'll love them.
The book could easily double as a French language lesson. Eloise explains all kinds of french nouns and adjectives that are useful to travelers in a way that makes them easy to remember.
"Oh I absolutely miss the Plaza" and then it's time to go back. This time she has 114 pieces of luggage.
I think a hidden blessing of this book is that it will kindle an irresistible urge to visit Paris. If you read the book to your children when they are young, you will probably have an easier time recruiting them as traveling companions for a wonderful family vacation in France.
If you already know French, you will also enjoy little jokes that are included in that language. If you do not know French, you'll still enjoy the book very much.
After you have finished enjoying this wonderful book, I suggest that you think about how you can take a trip that will cause you to change your usual life style . . . so that you learn new ways of thinking about life, as well as seeing new sights.
Vive la France! Vive Eloise!
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on 18 June 2013
even though you may think it could be hard to relate to the posh little girl set around 80 years ago. It is so easy, she was a true feminist and got into more scrapes that the average little boy. Great insight into adult relationships and life from a little girls perspective who is very matter of fact about her life with uninvolved glamorous parents who are never there with a rawther liberal nanny!

this is even better if your kids are learning some french, they will very much appreciate the humour.

I think there should have been books on the parents who were probably just as funny.
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on 12 June 1999
I read Eloise (at the Plaza) and Eloise in Paris - all 'very much' Kay. I loved that woman - a very good friend of my mom's. I worked with/for her when (as a teenager) I did her musical arrangements and orchestrations for her fabulous act with The Williams Brothers - which opened in Vegas and played all over the world.
She was one of a kind (you can see her in Funny Face) brilliant musical/vocal arranger herself, world traveler, racounter, incredible lady. I've bumper into her in Rome, Paris, London, New York, LA and was terribly saddened by her death (even though she was painfully painfully thin her whole life). She was one of the great women in the history of show biz. The Eloise books are thrilling to say the least and I continually laugh every time I pick one up even after I've gone through them 100 times. I'm ordering them once again as I left mine in London and MUST have them once again. Buddy Bregman
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on 7 May 1999
When my 18 yr.old daughter was 5 years old, I unwrapped a package in my Mom's attic that contained my original copy of "Eloise in Paris". It had been given to me by my best friend when I was 15; how we had laughed at Eloise's antics, especially the way she created chaos in the traffic circle at the Champs Elysees! When I bought her "Eloise at the Plaza" 3 years later, she insisted that we go for tea at the Plaza, in NY. Unfortunately, her own energetic tactics kept us from being seated.Instead I chased her from the elegant Boutiques to the fancy ladies' rooms on the ground floor. No doubt my daughter will pass along her love of this 'holy terror' to her own children, and another generation of Eloise wannabes will be born.
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on 20 July 1999
This was my absolute favorite childhood book! I read it at least 1000 times! It allowed me to fantasize what it was like to be a rich little girl and travel to Paris (something I still haven't done!). It also gave me an interest in learning French, which I studied for 10 years. Most of all, it allowed me to see that being a strong, freeminded, quirky girl (woman) was OK. Eloise doesn't have a hard time saying what she means or doing what she wants even though it may not be conventional. A good role model for little girls!
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on 10 May 1999
I first discovered this book about 11 years ago in Paris. I read the French version to the children I cared for. What a wonderful children's story. Ever since, I have often imagined what it would be like to be Eloise (ahem, that's Heloise in French) wandering around as a child in Paris for the first time. Imagine the magic! It's what little girl's daydreams are made of! My French children loved the book and carried it with them everywhere proving that this book is universal in its appeal.
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on 12 June 1999
I just about cried with joy to see this book on the homepage of Amazon.com. I read this book as a child at my grandmother's house, and when subsequent grandchildren visited in later years, the book disappeared. I am now 31 and have been searching and waiting for at least 10 years for this, my all-time favorite book. My father is French, and I loved comparing Eloise's views and interpretations with my own visits (so very different!). I JUST LOVE THIS BOOK!!!
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