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Ellington Uptown Extra tracks, Import


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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Mar. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Extra tracks, Import
  • Label: Sbme Special Mkts
  • ASIN: B0012GN1I4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 409,494 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nikica Gilic on 8 Nov. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Yes, this is the beautiful album where Betty Roche sings on Take the A-train, Clark Terry shines on Perdido, the whole band gives a classic re-working of The Mooche, Louis Bellson struts
his stuff on Skin Deep,
and there are some extra tracks and nice suites as well...

Maybe not the most famous Ellington albums (it's from early 1950s, it doesn't have Hodges, there's no diminuendo and crescendo in blue...)it has so many highlights and classics it is actually strange it's not mentioned more often in general evaluation of orchestral jazz, swing, mainstream, Ellington and jazz classics in general...
And, yes, some of the orchestrations show some influence of modernity, as do Gonsalves on tenor and Betty Roche on vocals... But it's a testament of Duke's (and, probably, Strayhorn's) constant search and development, not just a passing sign of times. It is one of those lovely albums that are at the same time essential and good introduction to artist's work.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S. J. Turner on 6 May 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The strong points about this cd include the amazing accurate sound quality, its wonderful to hear those clarinet keys rattle during the solo on Mooche, this cd is a DSD transfer triumph. Skin deep you may not like if you are not a big fan of drum solo's, I think it's ok but every time the full band kicks in again is a bit of a relief. The controversial suite. Is it some kind of knowing parody as some reviews have suggested? I don't know but I've never warmed to it. Despite this the band are red hot throughout and if you love Clark Terry there's lots to love.Over time the part of this cd I keep coming back to is the Liberian suite as it is a fantastic composition throughout plus the sound quality is phenomenal for its recording date of 1949. Compared with the rest of the cd on Liberian there is occasional surface noise. Compared, however, with a Masters of Jazz selection of the suite I have the imrpovements brought about by this version are incredible. All in all, for the price unmissable bargain but over time you may well dip into your favourites rather than listen all the way through.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nikica Gilic on 8 Nov. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Yes, this is the beautiful album where Betty Roche sings on Take the A-train, Clark Terry shines on Perdido, the whole band gives a classic re-working of The Mooche, Louis Bellson struts
his stuff on Skin Deep,
and there are some extra tracks and nice suites as well...

Maybe not the most famous Ellington albums (it's from early 1950s, it doesn't have Hodges, there's no diminuendo and crescendo in blue...)it has so many highlights and classics it is actually strange it's not mentioned more often in general evaluation of orchestral jazz, swing, mainstream, Ellington and jazz classics in general...
And, yes, some of the orchestrations show some influence of modernity, as do Gonsalves on tenor and Betty Roche on vocals... But it's a testament of Duke's (and, probably, Strayhorn's) constant search and development, not just a passing sign of times. It is one of those lovely albums that are at the same time essential and good introduction to artist's work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The original album "Uptown" was recorded on the cusp of 1951 and 1952 and there were just five tracks including the exhibition in drumming from Louie Bellson "Skin Deep" (7min), then a reworked "The Mooche", "A Train", the first airing of "Harlem" (14 min) and "Perdido". This band features Paul Gonsalves, who had recently joined the band for "the rest of his life" (1974), but Johnny Hodges is missing (he left hoping to do better independently...wrong!). However there are many other mainstays including Clark Terry who features especially on Perdido.
"Harlem" was perhaps Ellington's first major work, a "tone-parallel" to represent Sunday morning in Harlem. He would record this again several years later in Stockholm.
These five tracks are excellent!
The CD is bulked up with two tracks from 1951: "the Controversal Suite" with essentally the same band. These are two fine tracks but not quite top drawer.
Finally from 1947 "The Liberian Suite" comprising five "sketches". These is some interesting music here and I have always been drawn to the first track "I like the sunrise". Hodges is in this band, Al Sears still holds the tenor sax seat and Sonny Greer is the drummer.
The late forties / early fifties saw the Ellington band in transition.
Some good music here, especially the first five tracks.
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