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Elgar: Symphony No.1/Cockaigne (In London Town) - Concert Overture
 
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Elgar: Symphony No.1/Cockaigne (In London Town) - Concert Overture

20 Feb. 2014 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
18:52
30
2
7:17
30
3
11:41
30
4
11:30
30
5
14:24
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1991
  • Release Date: 20 Feb. 2014
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1991 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:03:44
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001PJ644Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,580 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This disc, very well recorded in 1990, brings a superbly played account of both works and this disc joins Mackerras' accounts of the second symphony and the Enigma discs in both of those respects.

The overture, which concludes the disc, is full of swagger and is really all that one would wish from this fine piece. The symphony is also finely played with a reading that is similar, but not quite the same, as the Handley account. The missing ingredient, if one may describe it a s such, is the sense of subjective emotional personal involvement. This is most apparent in the concluding half of the finale where all the threads are pulled together. That is exactly what happens here as regards the musical threads and it cannot be faulted in that way. However, Mackerras seems to hold back just that small degree of personal emotional connection that makes this a slightly objective conclusion, as if viewed from a slight emotional distance.

I am aware that I seem to be making a big deal of what may be to many, to be an otherwise superb end to a very fine reading. It all boils down to what the listener expects, or wants, to feel emotionally at the end of 50 minutes of potentially emotionally involving music. Barbirolli delivered emotion writ large. Boult was more measured but there can be no mistaking the emotional involvement, controlled though it might be. Handley is a little cooler but there is also a palpable emotional release by the end.

To put this in context, I still find Mackerras to be right up there with the leaders and he still delivers much more than many others on the emotional level. It is all a matter of scale where small differences are still apparent and may, or may not, matter.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Being very impressed by Mackerras' outstanding EMI recording of Enigma Variations, I bought this CD and found one of the most eloquent and enthralling renditions of Cockaigne Overture. The 1st symphony is also superbly played by LSO. The interpretation is very close to Vernon Handley's famous EMI version - the sense of everything in right place, the noble Elgarian dignity and the ebb and flow of the music most beautifully captured with emotion and imagination. But what I miss in this performance is a bit more of the wild abandon and Wagnerian grandeur, especially in the finale, which you find in C.Davis, Sinopoli and Solti's immensely powerful accounts. The recording quality is amazingly rich and spacious.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Lack of reviews made me hesitate to buy this Argo recording, but the performers were enough to make my mind up and I was not in the least disappointed. The nimble-fingered strings and woodwind, and the glorious brass and percussion of the LSO really bring the symphony and the overture to vivid life. Charles Mackerras directs their considerable forces with precision and lucidity, while the D-D-D Decca recording from 1991 belies its age. The sound is expansive and clear with only very slight bass muddle here and there. There is also a strange sound during a loud moment a couple of minutes into the 4th movement, which I can only describe as akin to a football rattle; though this kind of thing has been scored in Strauss's Till Eulenspiegel for example, I am not sure Elgar did here, so maybe it's a distorted raspberry from the brass, but anyway I was glad to find that it wasn't a speaker coil scraping.
The Cockaigne overture, a long-time favourite of mine, gets the same brisk but dextrous treatment, culminating in a room-shaking finale with pipe organ pedal notes bidding to drown the orchestra at full stretch. Spine-tingling stuff!
One star docked for the minor shortcomings mentioned, but do buy with confidence and see how your equipment copes.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x93b053fc) out of 5 stars 1 review
HASH(0x92c56ca8) out of 5 stars A finely played and recorded disc with the symphony viewed a touch objectively 11 Sept. 2013
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This disc, very well recorded in 1990, brings a superbly played account of both works and this disc joins Mackerras' accounts of the second symphony and the Enigma discs in both of those respects.

The overture, which concludes the disc, is full of swagger and is really all that one would wish from this fine piece. The symphony is also finely played with a reading that is similar, but not quite the same, as the Handley account. The missing ingredient, if one may describe it a s such, is the sense of subjective emotional personal involvement. This is most apparent in the concluding half of the finale where all the threads are pulled together. That is exactly what happens here as regards the musical threads and it cannot be faulted in that way. However, Mackerras seems to hold back just that small degree of personal emotional connection that makes this a slightly objective conclusion, as if viewed from a slight emotional distance.

I am aware that I seem to be making a big deal of what may be to many, to be an otherwise superb end to a very fine reading. It all boils down to what the listener expects, or wants, to feel emotionally at the end of 50 minutes of potentially emotionally involving music. Barbirolli delivered emotion writ large. Boult was more measured but there can be no mistaking the emotional involvement, controlled though it might be. Handley is a little cooler but there is also a palpable emotional release by the end.

To put this in context, I still find Mackerras to be right up there with the leaders and he still delivers much more than many others on the emotional level. It is all a matter of scale where small differences are still apparent and may, or may not, matter. This disc has been a rewarding part of my collection for 12 years and, like all other discs in the collection, it is still played at least once each year. With a large collection to enjoy annually there is no room for discs that do not deliver, and Mackerras still delivers. So too does the Argo recording.

I would therefore suggest that this disc is still a front runner but if the need for a significant emotional response is required at the end then there are others that deliver more. If the need is for a more objectively satisfying conclusion, then Mackerras is hard to beat.
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