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Elgar: Kingdom (The) / Sospiri / Sursum Corda
 
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Elgar: Kingdom (The) / Sospiri / Sursum Corda

1 Sep 1989 | Format: MP3

£14.98 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
9:00
2
8:12
3
5:04
4
3:26
5
5:30
6
4:39
7
14:58
8
5:39
Disc 2
1
9:02
2
10:05
3
6:22
4
5:34
5
6:08
6
4:40
7
9:44


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Sep 1989
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Chandos
  • Copyright: (C) 1989 Chandos
  • Total Length: 1:48:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002XAW7PG
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 98,090 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. H. A. Jones TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Aug 2012
Format: Audio CD
This is a fitting complement to the oratorio The Apostles. It was intended to be the second part of a proposed trilogy intended for the Birmingham Festival, The Apostles being the first part. It is of almost exactly the same length at just over 50 min. Both works use a system of leitmotifs in true Wagnerian fashion. The text was written by Elgar himself using the New Testament and the Apocrypha.

Part I of The Kingdom takes place in The Upper Room with Peter (sung by David Wilson-Johnson) addressing the rest of the disciples. Parts II and III concern the Pentecost, 50 days after the Ascension. First the Virgin Mary (Margaret Marshall) and Mary Magdalene (Felicity Palmer) relate acts of Jesus' healing. Then it's the turn of Peter and John (Arthur Davies) to interpret Jesus' works and words. The oratorio ends with the first Eucharist and a singing of the Lord's Prayer.

The music here is inspirational, whatever your religious affiliation, and I think it's a pity that the work is so rarely performed today. As with The Apostles, the music is played by the London Symphony Orchestra backed by the London Symphony Chorus, under the direction of Richard Hickox. It took me longer to get into The Kingdom than The Apostles but I'm sure this is more a reflection on my musicality than on the music itself. Once again, Chandos have done a splendid job in bringing this oratorio to a much wider audience than would ever have any hope of hearing the work in live performance.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
We did this choral work recently in my choir, joining forces with another choir as it works best with many voices. Although it took me a while to get to know it (it is difficult to sing), I am so glad I did as it has become one of my favourite pieces ever, and has awoken in me an interest in Elgar. I did not send off for this recording until after our performance, as I couldn't bear the thought of living without hearing it and have listened to it constantly since it arrived. The bass and tenor soloists, in particular, have some sublime moments, and the radiant soprano aria 'The sun goeth down' is justly famous. I don't know why 'The Kingdom' is so little known or performed so rarely: to me it is a monumental and glorious work.
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0 of 8 people found the following review helpful By W. Mist on 19 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
Purchased this for my father-in-law. He thinks its brill, loves it. So does some of his family and friend.
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0 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John on 1 Aug 2010
Format: Audio CD
The recording is very good and I am finding it extremely valuable in rehersing my part
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The British Way with Choral Music 1 April 2006
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Sir Edward Elgar composed some sustainable jewels in his lifetime: the 'Enigma Variations', the cello concerto, the Second Symphony, and yes, the globally overused 'Pomp and Circumstance' marches. Some say the rest of his output is minor, but it takes a recording such as this of one of his oratorios (the 'Dream of Gerontius' is more popular) entitled 'The Kingdom' to remind us what a great orchestrator Elgar was and how well he wrote for the voice.

'The Kingdom' is a major work for large orchestra, full chorus, and four soloists. Based on biblical texts the work surveys the concept of hope and promise as found in the Gospels. In this performance Richard Hickox conducts the London Symphony Orchestra and chorus with a fine group of soloists - Felicity Palmer, Margaret Mitchell, Arthur Davies, and David Wilson-Johnson - each of whom enunciates the text perfectly and each has a rich soaring voice. The structure of the work is massive but there are moments where the beauty of lines such as Elgar composed in the Nimrod variation from Enigma Variations that sing over the entire piece, making us realize that this is not just another British puffy oratorio (of which there are thankfully many!), but a stylish and moving composition.

The recording is fleshed out with the hauntingly beautiful 'Sospiri, adagio for strings, harp & organ' and the early 'Sursum Corda', termed an elévation for brass, organ, strings & 2 timpani. In all this is a generous example of why Elgar is viable in history as a 20th century composer, and this recording of 'The Kingdom' makes a fine case for encouraging more performances by choral ensembles looking for the 'different' big works. Recommended. Grady Harp, April 06
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Awesome recording 8 Sep 2005
By Jeffrey B. Fowler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Both from a sonic and a performance standpoint, this is definitely the best recording available of this neglected and underperformed work. Hickox' moving interpretation is well executed throughout. More than a faithful following of Elgar's many musical directives, the performance is alive, fresh, and moving.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Entering The Kingdom of Elgar 23 May 2003
By kevin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Sublime. I was moved to tears. Power, spirituality, poetry, emotion. You must experience this for yourself. Your life will not be the same again.
An ordinary American citizen reviews "The Kingdom." 8 Feb 2013
By phil - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I listen to baroque music, I like to hear vocal music sung in Italian. Listening to 20th century music, the English language is my favorite. Elgar is the best. I am not a musician, so how can a "world class" orchestra llike the London Symphony Orchestra and a top rated conductor like Richard Hickox ,sound anything less than spectecular to my perception, doing Elgar?
Elgar's oratorio The Kingdom 18 Aug 2012
By Dr. H. A. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a fitting complement to the oratorio The Apostles. It was intended to be the second part of a proposed trilogy intended for the Birmingham Festival, The Apostles being the first part. It is of almost exactly the same length at just over 50 min. Both works use a system of leitmotifs in true Wagnerian fashion. The text was written by Elgar himself using the New Testament and the Apocrypha.

Part I of The Kingdom takes place in The Upper Room with Peter (sung by David Wilson-Johnson) addressing the rest of the disciples. Parts II and III concern the Pentecost, 50 days after the Ascension. First the Virgin Mary (Margaret Marshall) and Mary Magdalene (Felicity Palmer) relate acts of Jesus' healing. Then it's the turn of Peter and John (Arthur Davies) to interpret Jesus' works and words. The oratorio ends with the first Eucharist and a singing of the Lord's Prayer.

The music here is inspirational, whatever your religious affiliation, and I think it's a pity that the work is so rarely performed today. As with The Apostles, the music is played by the London Symphony Orchestra backed by the London Symphony Chorus, under the direction of Richard Hickox. It took me longer to get into The Kingdom than The Apostles but I'm sure this is more a reflection on my musicality than on the music itself. Once again, Chandos have done a splendid job in bringing this oratorio to a much wider audience than would ever have any hope of hearing the work in live performance.

Elgar: The Apostles, Op. 49
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