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The Eleventh Plague (Cornelius Quaint Chronicles, Book 2) Paperback – 4 Mar 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: The Friday Project; Special Limited Ed edition (4 Mar. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 190632185X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906321857
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 619,425 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

As a boy I visited a circus where a kindly old fortune-teller decreed that I would grow up to become an author & illustrator of quirky, comedy, adventure stories.
If I ever grow up, I'll be sure to let her know that she was right.

Below are the various ways of getting in contact with me:

* Follow me on Twitter: @DarrenCraske.
* Check out my blog at: www.darrencraskeblog.wordpress.com
* Like my Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/DarrenCraskeBooks
* Mail me at: corneliusquaint@hotmail.com
* Direct Message me on Goodreads.com

* Or if all that fails, you could always record a holographic message and store it inside an Astromech Droid that hijacks an escape pod to flee from a Rebel Cruiser under attack by an Imperial Star Destroyer, and thus successfully completing a million to one landing on the nearby planet just a short walk from my small house in the Jundland Wastes.


Product Description

Review

Praise for The Equivoque Principle:

‘Marvello's Travelling Circus brings light and colour to the foggy streets of Victorian London, but you can't hang about in fictional Victorian London for long without a series of brutal murders. One of the victims belongs to the circus, and suspicion falls upon Prometheus, the strongman. The boss, a brilliant conjuror named Cornelius Quaint, turns detective to clear the giant's name… boisterous comedy and hairpin plot twists. ‘

THE TIMES

About the Author

Darren Craske began his career writing comic books and lives in the south of England.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By JCP123 on 21 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really enjoyed this book. It is not my "usual" type of read but thought I would give it a go after a recommendation from a friend. I have to say I really enjoyed it. From the first chapter you are drawn into the characters and the plot. The adventure of Cornelious and Madame Destine is a gripping ride and you are spurred on wanting to know more and more in the story.

I have not read the earlier book in the series but will definately be buying that now and I am chomping at the bit for the next installment following the Eleventh Plague..........
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By sniffer24601 on 6 April 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Started reading this book early last year but during a house move lost it in the mass of boxes. Having recently relocated the book I sat down for a good read.

Starting off where the first of darren's books ended I found myself back in Victorian England, then the adventure begins. The main characters are whisked off to foreign lands to battle an evil consortium that has planned a terrible deed that would kill thousands.

The book kept me engrossed until the end and I am now sniffing around amazon to get the next instalment

Thanks Darren
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By GS on 12 July 2010
Format: Paperback
Reviewing The Eleventh Plague presented me with a problem, I received the book fully intending to make copious notes and give a thorough and page by page, chapter by chapter review. So what happened to all my plans, why am I sitting here working out a fancy way of saying, stop what you are doing and go by this book. Or more accurately stop what you are doing and go buy the first two books in the Cornelius Quaint Chronicles (as the Eleventh Plague is the second of the chronicles with The Equivoque Principle being the first).
Well, I'll tell you what happened, Cornelius happened. Cornelius has been described as a mix of Sherlock Holmes and Harry Houdini with a hint of Indiana Jones thrown in for good measure, and when you read the chronicles you can appreciate that description. He's not your traditional action hero, but he does have an element of Holmes given the era the books are set in and his cerebral approach to problems. Not that he thinks on the situation at hand as much as Holmes, nor does he have the drug issues ;-) Cornelius is every bit the showman Houdini was, and you'll just have to read the Eleventh Plague to pick up on the Indiana Jones element.
What does make these books a pleasant change from the norm is Cornelius' companion, he doesn't have the mindless dogsbody that can't think for himself, or the vacant headed bimbo that many seem to acquire. The companion for Cornelius in the Eleventh Plague is a rather mature fortune teller called Madame Destine, it's almost as if rather than take Dr Watson along Sherlock took his house keeper Mrs Hudson to meet the hound of the Baskervilles.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luisma Arnanz on 28 Aug. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This installment of the Cornelius quaint adventures was a good read. I like the fact that chapters are jumping from one character to another and Cornelius and Destine have one adventure each.

Looking forward to start with a new one.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BookJunkie on 23 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the second book in the Cornelius Quaint series, and the events follow straight on from where the first book ends (there is a brief recap of the events in The Equivoque Principle - the first book - for anybody who has not read it).

Cornelius has left most of his beloved circus family behind, to travel to Egypt accompanied only by Madame Destine, the circus fortune teller and faithful friend of Quaint. In Egypt, Quaint has to stop a plan masterminded by the Hades Consortium to poison the River Nile and cause death to countless Egyptians. Along the way, he encounters desert thieves, has to deal people who are determined to kill him by any means necessary, and deal with long buried secrets which resurface.

Just as in The Equivoque Principle, this is an enjoyable romp, full of surprising twists and turns - a situation could turn on it's head very rapidly! - and like Quaint himself, the reader is never entirely sure who can be trusted. Our hero is again full of witty quips and smart asides, and I found myself rooting for him all the way through. He and Madame Destine actually find themselves separated for a large portion of the story, and the opportunity is taken for both characters to be explored further. (This was particularly welcome to me in the case of Destine, as she was the one character I found hard to warm to in The Equivoque Principle; I liked her a lot more when reading this book).

Initially I did think that I would miss some of the characters from Quaint's circus troupe, who he takes his leave of in the first few chapters. I especially hoped that his valet Butter might go to Egypt with him, but he was tasked with running the circus in Quaint's absence.
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