Elephants on Acid: And Other Bizarre Experiments and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.80
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Add to Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Elephants On Acid and other Bizarre Experiments Hardcover


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
£0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: n/a
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752226819
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752226811
  • Product Dimensions: 22 x 14 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 451,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By J. Turnock on 11 Oct 2008
Format: Paperback
Elephants On Acid is made up of surprisingly entertaining, interesting content in a witty, humorous tone. I say surprisingly because I was not expecting a book that has apparently sold very well to have experiments that are well-picked and really well researched, in my opinion, as two of them were ones I studied in my AS-level psychology class, and the book went into more detail than my teachers did. Which might be a sign of bad teaching rather than a very well researched book but let's assume that's not the case.

There are ten chapters with each chapter's experiments being grouped together under a theme - For instance death, the senses, sleep, sex. Some experiments last only a page or two but others go on for a few more than that, and there are clever headings separating them from one another. There are the more well-known experiments (Such as Zimbardo's prison experiment), the experiments whose after-effects seem pretty well-known (Does Mozart make babies smarter?), the totally obscure (cockroach racing, anyone?) and the things everyone wonders about (Coke or pepsi?).

Personally, I feel that the first chapter is ill-placed as it's heavy on the animal decapitation and I think that might put some people off, for all the content is very interesting in its own disturbing way. So I say, preserve! I won't lie, there is some more decapitating etc to come post the first chapter. However, it's much more spread out and easier to take post chapter one as it's liberally overweighed by experiments ripe with whimsy, oddness and genuinely interesting (non-violent!) insights into human and animal behaviour.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bob Ventos on 10 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback
Grouped in sections dealing with the Big Subjects (life, sensation, memory, sex, sleep, evil, children) this book contains many of the more famous psychological experiments (Zimbardo's prison, Milgram's obedience experiment, John Watson and Little Albert's rat, and Wegner's White Bear) as well as others less well-known but chosen for their outrageousness or smirk-factor (electrocuting corpses, counting pubic hairs after sex, giving LSD to the terminally ill). It debunks a few myths (babies don't instinctively choose a balanced diet, cockroaches wouldn't survive a nuclear holocaust) - and also contains some real eye-openers (the branding of Coke actually affects it's taste!). And although it's written in a jolly-humorous way, with a little joke at the end of each section (some as cringeworthy as the experiment they conclude), the book's a forceful reminder of the need for today's Ethics Committees in Science. What's frequently been done to animals is horrific, and what was sometimes done to humans is nearly as bad.

This is the sort of book that, if you're reading it in someone else's presence, is likely to make you want to read bits out loud to them. There are references too - unusual in a popular book like this - perhaps because the author thought that no-one would believe some of these stories otherwise!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dan on 1 Sep 2009
Format: Paperback
Science can be fun. I've seen this book everywhere--it's number 2 in the book chart at a certain large book, magazine and stationery selling chain at the moment so I picked it up in 2-book offer. I'm glad I did. I whizzed through it and thoroughly enjoyed the way the neat little scientific stories are explained. Perfect if you want to learn a little but have some fun alon the way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By George Kelly on 18 Feb 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Elephants on Acid is basically a collection of interesting, intriguing and occasionally insane experiments that Scientists have undertaken over the years. Each chapter surrounds a new subject, such as animal experiments or sex-based experiments or whatever--and each category is split into sections, scrolling through the different experiments and their outcomes.

It's a thought-provoking read. I understood the reasons behind some of the experiments, and was baffled by others, as was the writer in some cases. But even the mad experiments have a vein of reason behind them; it seems that scientists will test anything, just to find out the whys or the hows. And it makes okay reading. I wouldn't say I was riveted or unable to put the book down. It's not something that will hook you into non-stop reading. It's more of a book to take around and read when you have a spare five minutes. The majority of the segments are short and easily-digestible and the book makes perfect bathroom reading, although I'm sure that wasn't the purpose.

So if you want something to read on your lunch break or whilst stuck in a particularly long queue, or maybe even something between programmes, this is a pretty good option.

At the very least, it will give you something to talk about with your friends.

And if you don't have any friends, then maybe you need to get out more.

And if you're always out, but STILL don't have any friends, maybe you need to evaluate your personality . . .

Anyway, read the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martensgirl on 1 Mar 2013
Format: Paperback
I found this book a fairly easy read, good for dipping into and interesting. Clearly, today's ethics committees would have prevented many of these experiments from happening; I can't help thinking that the author trivializes just how distasteful some of these experiments were.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback