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The Finite Element Method in the Static and Dynamic Deformation and Consolidation of Porous Media (Wiley Series in Numerical Methods in Engineering) Hardcover – 23 Oct 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 508 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 2nd Edition edition (23 Oct. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471928097
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471928096
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.6 x 23.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,201,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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From the Back Cover

The Finite Element Method in the Static and Dynamic Deformation and Consolidation of Porous Media Second Edition Roland W. Lewis, University of Wales Swansea, UK Bernard A. Schrefler, University of Padua, Italy Following the highly successful first edition, this text deals with numerical solutions of coupled thermo–hydro–mechanical problems in porous media. Governing equations are newly derived in a general form using both averaging methods (hybrid mixture theory) and an engineering approach. Unique new features of the book include numerical solutions for fully and partially saturated consolidation, subsidence analysis including far field boundary conditions (Infinite Elements), new case studies and also petroleum reservoir simulation. Extended heat and mass transfer in partially saturated porous media, and consideration of phase change, are covered in detail. In addition, large strain, fully and partially saturated, soil dynamics problems are explained. Back analysis for consolidation problems is also included. Significantly, the reader is provided with access to a Finite Element code for coupled thermo–hydro–mechanical problems in partially saturated porous media with full two phase flow and phase change, written according to the theory outlined in the book and obtainable via the Network of the Italian Research Council (COMES). With a range of engineering applications from geotechnical and petroleum engineering through to bioengineering and materials science, this book represents an important resource for students, researchers and practising engineers in all these and related fields.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Williams on 10 May 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a second edition of the book published some ten years ago. This version is undoubtly has included a lot of new and expanded topics, particularly on multiphase modelling, large strain static and dynamics problem. Unlike many other text book on continuum porous mechancis which drift onto extremely abstract and difficult mathematical concepts, this book place its emphasis on direct application of the poromechanics equations itself in fields like reservoir engineering, geo-enviromental problems, hazard analysis in nuclear waste storage and petroleum engineering. The book is quite well planned. As long as the readers can capture the conceptual model and theories presented in the second chapter, then he/she will not have any difficulty at all in understanding the rest of the books. Another aspect that is nice about this is that the authors has shown the readers how an extremely difficult problems can be modelled by modified a little bit here and there in the equations presented in chapter 2. This style of writing is not only comprehensive but also reveal the fact, as long as one understand the most fundamental bits, everythings is the same. I have not personally come across any books written in such a comprehensive and friendly way. Above all, for those who are actively involved in research in poromechanics, this book is a must buy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
An excellent book on fluid flow in porous media 26 May 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I still remember vividly the experience of reading, and being greatly impressed by, the first edition of this book when I was a PhD student at Swansea in the late 1980's. It was the first book of its kind, despite the many available texts on groundwater flow in porous media. Even today, there still exists no other book which covers all the mechanical and numerical aspects of flow in deforming porous media in such detail. The book has now been extensively updated and several new chapters have been added to give a much broader coverage of recent research interests in this field. The chapters are organised as follows:
1. 'Introduction' 2. 'Mechanics of saturated and partially saturated porous media' 3. 'Numerical solution for isothermal consolidation' 4. 'Solid-phase constitutive relationships, variable permeabilities and solution procedures' 5. 'Verification of elastic and elastoplastic consolidation programs' 6. 'Modelling subsidence: numerical aspects and problems of regional scale' 7. 'Modelling subsidence: case studies' 8. 'Modelling three-phase flow in deforming saturated oil reservoirs' 9. 'Fractured reservoir simulation' 10. 'Heat and fluid flow in deforming porous media' 11. 'Secondary consolidation creep in solids' 12. 'Soil-structure interaction' 13. 'Back analysis in consolidation' 14. 'Large-strain quasi-static and dynamic soil behaviour'
There is also a Subject Index at the end of the book. The list of references given at the end of each chapter is extremely comprehensive (i.e. it even has me in it). As the contents indicate, this is a unique book which presents a systematic development of mathematical models and numerical solutions for heat and mass transfer in fully and partially saturated deforming porous media. The governing equations are newly derived in a general form using both averaging methods (hybrid mixture theory) and an engineering approach. Within this framework, a wide spectrum of engineering problems are solved which include consolidation of fully and partially saturated soil, land subsidence due to excessive groundwater withdrawal, and petroleum reservoir simulation. Several case studies are presented in great detail which I find most interesting. Another significant feature of the book is that the reader is provided with access to a finite element code for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical problems in partially saturated porous media with full two phase flow and phase change, written according to the theory outlined in the book and obtainable via the Network of the Italian Research Council (COMES). For more than 20 years, the two distinguished authors have both carried out extensive research on, and made significant contributions to, various topics covered in this state-of-the-art book. It represents an important resource and is thus highly recommended for students, researchers and practitioners in a range of engineering fields from geotechnical and petroleum engineering through to bioengineering and materials science.
Yi-Min (Mike) Xie, Associate Professor in Civil Engineering, Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia,
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Appeared in Meccanica, Vol. 34, n. 3, June 1999, pp. 231-232 19 Jun. 2000
By Giulio Maier - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
(with kind permission from Kluver Academic Publisher)
The mechanics of porous multiphase media (composed of a deformable solid skeleton and one or more fluids) are known to stem primarily from the pioneering works of P. Fillunger and C. Terzaghi, motivated by geotechnical and dam engineering during and after the first World War and from the more academic investigations of M. A. Biot during and after the second. Nowadays this area of theoretical and applied mechanics turns out to be mature but still fast growing. Its recent growth is perhaps partly due to its intrinsic complexities and certainly primarily fostered by its relevance to such diverse disciplines and technological fields such as soil and rock mechanics, civil engineering of dams and embankments, geophysics, environmental engineering, material sciences, biomechanics, petroleum and offshore engineering, physical chemistry. This book by two internationally acknowledged experts in the field is the substantially expanded and updated second edition of a successful text appeared about ten years ago. The research interests of the Authors are focused on computational mechanics of coupled problems and, especially on the finite element method and are reflected in this book as well. However this volume provides a very comprehensive conspectus of almost the whole field in its present broad spectrum of topics, even if special emphasis is on numerical solution methods and on environmental and geotechnical engineering applications: from the conceptual scientific fundamentals to case histories, concerning timely real-life engineering situations. The physical and mathematical foundations of the multiphase continuum mechanics are established in the first chapters both by the phenomenological approach which generalised Biot's classical theory and by the averaging ("hybrid mixture theory") approach rooted in interpretations and modelling of phenomena at the microscale. After the formulation of mathematical models in terms of continuum mechanics at the phenomenological 'macroscopic' scale, three chapters are devoted to the finite element discretization and numerical solution of those continuum models and to their validation by examples. Subsequently, surface subsidence phenomena are analysed by various approaches, and phenomena, which range from single-acquifer withdrawal, settlements over gaseous reservoirs, compaction of oil deposits, up to subsidence at the regional scale. Among various real-life situations considered in order to validate the predictive tools dealt with in these chapters, special attention is paid to Venice and its region (which harbours the latter author's university). Chapters 9-14 are devoted to special topics and extensions of the coupled problem theory and numerical methodology: fractured reservoirs, heat flow, drying processes, creep manifestations, structural interactions, parameter identification, dynamic and finite strain analysis. In my opinion, this book is bound to represent a useful and lasting reference for all researchers, engineers and students interested in the now fashionable, multifaceted title subject. It is well organised, clearly written and very rich in up-to-date technical knowledge. Its orientation towards computational methods and engineering practice confers to this volume a special role in the scientific literature (in a sense, complementary to, for example, Coussy's "Mechanics of Porous Continua" appeared in 1995). The authors, who substantially contributed to the growth of this field of applied mechanics in the last two decades, are to be congratulated on this expanded second edition of their treatise.
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