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Elegy for Eddie (Maisie Dobbs) Paperback – 25 Mar 2013


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Elegy for Eddie (Maisie Dobbs) + Leaving Everything most loved (Maisie Dobbs) + Lesson in Secrets, A (Maisie Dobbs)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: ALLISON & BUSBY (25 Mar. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749012242
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749012243
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 46,010 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'I'm a huge Maisie Dobbs fan' Lee Child

About the Author

Jacqueline Winspear is the author of the New York Times bestselling series featuring Maisie Dobbs. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Agatha, Alex and Macavity awards for the first book in the series, Maisie Dobbs, which was also nominated for the Edgar Award for Best Novel. Originally from Britain, Jacqueline now lives in the United States. www.jacquelinewinspear.com --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stanley Crowe on 8 May 2014
Format: Paperback
Well done, Jacqueline Winspear. All the things that I thought were missing from the previous novel, "A Lesson in Secrets," are fully acknowledged here -- the plot brings up issues that relate to differences in class (and that, of course, reflects on Maisie's relationship with James Compton), differences in education (which has enabled Maisie to move out of the class she was born into), historical circumstances (the rise of Hitler) and British politics c. 1933. The secondary plot -- the one that focuses on Maisie's life -- raises questions about one's right (or not) to make decisions about the well-being of others less fortunately situated, and that plot has a tight thematic relation to the main plot -- the matter of Maisie's investigation -- which raises a parallel question about who has the right to decide, in an ostensible democracy, what's best for "the people," or the country as a whole, and the further question of what means might be justified in pursuing that ostensibly "good" end. Thus Maisie finds herself dealing with people whose analysis of the dangers of the times agrees with her own -- but whose actions in furtherance of a response to the dangers are much more questionable.

I'm writing with a thematic focus to avoid "spoilers" as best I can, but I think I can say that a Rupert Murdoch-like figure looms large in the novel (though not quite in the way one might expect), and Winston Churchill makes a cameo appearance. Also, James Compton and the husband of Maisie's friend Priscilla are tied to the main plot much more closely than is usual.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By CHuBBie Founder on 30 Mar. 2013
Format: Paperback
The Maisie Dodds series is one of the few series of books that I get as soon as they are published. This is the 7th I have read and I have to say my least favourite. The series of books is as much a social commentry of the times as it is a who-done-it. I enjoy the historical detail as much as the case that Maisie is dealing with. But I thought that there was too much filler in this book - too much of Maisie wondering what she was doing with her life and not enough emphasis on events. Another reviewer stated that the the ending was very open and at the end I was left feeling rather disappointed. If you are new to Maisie Dodds I would not recommend this as the book to start with.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie De Pue TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 21 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
"Elegy for Eddie," is the latest release in Jacqueline Winspear's popular, bestselling historical mystery series featuring Maisie Dobbs. The author burst onto the scene in 2003, hitting bestseller and award lists with Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs Mystery 1), first in the series. It was set, as all the ensuing entries in the series have been, in post-World War I Britain. Maisie, plucky, intelligent and likeable, began work as a servant at age 13, but by now, thanks to a mentor she found, has educated herself, and inherited a considerable fortune. She has spent the war years as a nurse in France. She now runs her own private investigation firm, and has developed a relationship with Viscount James Compton, scion of the family for whom she first began work as a maid. Winspear's books are well-plotted, rather leisurely in exposition, but darker than many cozies as Maisie is continually under the influence of her war experiences, sometimes described in flashbacks.

We meet up again with Maisie , "one of the great fictional heroines, equal parts haunted and haunting" according to Parade magazine, in early April 1933. The costermongers of Covent Garden--sellers of fruit and vegetables on the streets of London--are fond of their coworker Eddie Pettit. They know him as a gentle soul who was actually born in a stable, and has a near-magic gift for working with horses. Suddenly Eddie is killed in a violent accident; the grieving costers are deeply skeptical about his death. They wonder who would want to kill Eddie--and why? And they take their doubts to Maisie.

Maisie's father, Frankie, had been a costermonger, so she has known the men since childhood.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gail Cooke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 April 2012
Format: Hardcover
In the ninth installment of her popular Maisie Dobbs series Jacqueline Winspear brings us one of her most affecting and intriguing stories to date. We meet 16-year-old Maudie Pettit, very pregnant and soon to give birth. "Maudie had been born in the workhouse, and she was determined that not only would she not be going back there, but her baby wouldn't be born in the workhouse either." She worked nights at Starlings Brewery located in Lambeth, London, cleaning the horse's stalls. It is there in 1887 that her son, Eddie, is born.

Some years later the indefatigable Maisie Dobbs comes to her office to find a delegation from her past. Waiting for her, scrubbed and in their best, is a group of costermongers, men who sell fruits and vegetables from horse-drawn carts. She remembers them from her childhood as they worked the streets of London as did her father. She also remembers Eddie Pettit, a slow but kind man who had a way with horses, almost a preternatural way of calming them. Now, Eddie is dead, killed according to his friends and they want Maisie's help.

Of course, she cannot refuse, so begins an investigation that leads her into an unsavory place of secret intelligence and propaganda, plus a confrontation with an apparently cruel, powerful press baron.

With her unrivaled mix of mystery and history Jacqueline Winspear takes us to a bygone London as vivid on the page as it was "between the wars."

Enjoy!

- Gail Cooke
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