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An Electric Storm [VINYL] Import

4.6 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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£18.01 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
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Product details

  • Vinyl (21 Nov. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Island
  • ASIN: B001ILKJRO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 104,316 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a legendary album in the eyes of the small group of people that have heard it. It was the brainchild of David Voorhaus, a classically trained bassist who dabbled in electronics. He made his own synthesizers (at that time they didn't have keyboards attached), and along with a couple of part-time members whose full time jobs were with the BBC Radiophonics Workshop they created this from laboriosly splicing pieces of tape together.
It's a very unique album that often falters at the songwriting, but the main attraction is the soundscape that has been created in exceptional circumstances. Each track took an eternity to create, and in the end they had so little material for an album that they recorded one track ('An Electric Storm in Hell') live with a drummer.
The first side (of the original vinyl version) is an eye opener for sure! It covers a wide variety of moods, subjects and styles. The second side is the real gem here though...
'The Visitation' is a track about a road accident that leads to an out of body experience. It's one of the most fightening tracks that you can ever listen to, coming second only to 'A Black Mass in Hell' which follows it. Someone that I worked with a few years back told a story of when him and his friends used to take large quantities of LSD and one by one sit in his wardrobe with the stereo speakers playing 'The Visitation' and 'A Black Mass in Hell' at full volume. He said that very few of them got to the end before bursting out of the wardrobe screaming...
This really is a must for anyone that is interested in the roots of electronica though.
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Format: Audio CD
This short (36min) CD was made by moonlighting musicians who had day jobs with the BBC's famous Radiophonic Workshop Musically, it sits at something of an intersection for post-war experimental electronic music...
On the one hand, it's possible to hear kinship with Joe Meek's 1960 LP "I Hear A New World" and 50's musique concrete, but also to hear prototypes of some of the more electronic bands of the 70's and 80's, such as Can and Amon Duul II and even, suprisingly, a little 90's dance stuff.
And of course, when this record was made in 1968, the experimental mind-set of psychedelia was still exerting an obvious if waning, influence.
A strong album generally, but the best (and trippiest) tracks are The Visitation and the last track, An Electric Storm In Hell. Both very Pink Floyd influenced and using a multitude of primtive elecectronic effects. Here Come The Fleas is possibly the weakest track on the CD, but even that ain't bad once you get past it's novelty comedy value.
A unique & unclassifiable record, then. If you consider yourself to be a bit of a fan of electronica, then this CD is a must. And I'll bet my left leg that it's already beeen sampled to hell by those with only a tiny fraction of the imagination & technique.
And to think it was all done with the aid of nasty, old-fashioned tape, physically edited, processed, filtered and with not a piece of digital gear or editing software in sight...
RIP, Delia Derbyshire. A true pioneer.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I heard about this album only because somebody once said that the last track "The Black Mass: An Electric Storm In Hell" was the most frightening thing they had ever heard. That's a pretty hard claim to live up to so I wasn't convinced I'd be all that impressed, but it really is so effective that I'm not in any hurry to hear it again! From the moment it started it made my scalp tickle, and the long, slow descent into screams and cries can even make someone listening to it stone-cold sober think they really had seen a glimpse of Hell! The track before it, "The Visitations", is almost as disturbing, particularly the woman crying at the end. The rest of the album isn't such a traumatic experience (thank God!). "Love Without Sound" is a real late Sixties sound, so much so you almost need to listen to it with a lava lamp switched on. "Here Come The Fleas" is a quirky comic number, the sort of mock-jazz stuff the "Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band" did. "My Game Of Loving" has the soundtrack of an orgy on it, which is harmless enough at first, but it soon begins to sound like party time at the Marquis de Sade's house! If you want to hear an album that is undoubtedly Different then this is for you, but it takes a heck of a lot to sit through the whole 7 minutes of the final track.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I couldn't tell you much about The White Noise - though the sleevenotes to 'An Electric Storm' are more informative- I came to this record through the Delia Derbyshire-connection (Derbyshire, who sadly died a few years ago, was a pioneer most famous for her work at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop - recent documentary 'Alchemists of Sound' showed she was making music like Pink Floyd's 'On the Run' in the late 1950s/early 1960s). David Vorhaus, an American-born electronic-enthuasist, is the principal member of The White Noise...
Like the wonderful Silver Apples, The White Noise fused psychedelic elements with experimental electronic music- some of this may sound dated (like Joe Meek, like Silver Apples, like the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, like United States of America), but it's always interesting. An album as odd as this you would be hard pressed to find - it certainly predicts such avant-delights as Throbbing Gristle, Psychic TV & AR Kane, sometimes drifting across several genres...

'My Game of Loving' sounds like you imagined The Beach Boys' 'Smile' would, drifting off into a series of orgasmic moans amid drum clatter. It's probably worth buying for this alone- the snoring at the end and sampling would be picked up on by Pink Floyd for the silly 'Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast.'Here Come the Fleas' is a comic-slice of pop-oddness, an electronic pop-advance on Van Dyke Parks' 'Song Cycle' and a cacophony of looped-voices colliding...

Delia Derbyshire co-writes two tracks here, the opening 'Love Without Sound' & the fantastic 'Firebird' - the latter sounding not unlike Syd Barrett with strange-futuristic music, which like Silver Apples' 'Program' sounds like a dial of a radio being turned randomly (a history of popular music lurking in the background of a pop song?).
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