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Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 [Import]

Matthias Goerne Audio CD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: £17.95
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MATTHIAS GOERNE

Matthias Goerne is one of the most internationally sought-after vocalists and a frequent guest at renowned festivals and concert halls. He has collaborated with leading orchestras all over the world. Conductors of the first rank as well as eminent pianists are among his musical partners.

Since his opera début at the Salzburg Festival in 1997 (Papageno), ... Read more in Amazon's Matthias Goerne Store

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Product details

  • Performer: Hendrikje Wangemann, Annette Markert, Matthias Görne, Peter Lika
  • Orchestra: Ernst Senff Chorus, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra
  • Conductor: Lothar Zagrosek
  • Composer: Hanns Eisler
  • Audio CD (27 Aug 2004)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Entartete Musik
  • ASIN: B00000428A
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,812 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - PräludiumGewandhausorchester Leipzig 6:55£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - An die Kämpfer in den KonzentrationslagernAnnette Markert 4:10£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - Etüde für OrchesterGewandhausorchester Leipzig 3:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - Erinnerung (Potsdam)Gewandhausorchester Leipzig 3:55£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - In SonnenburgAnnette Markert 2:49£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - Intermezzo für OrchesterGewandhausorchester Leipzig 4:19£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - Begräbnis des Hetzers im ZinksargAnnette Markert 5:29£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - BauernkantateVolker Schwarz 7:05£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - ArbeiterkantateAnnette Markert15:00£1.89  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - Allegro für OrchesterGewandhausorchester Leipzig10:46£1.49  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Eisler: Deutsche Sinfonie, Op.50 - EpilogGewandhausorchester Leipzig 1:17£0.79  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Hanns Eisler is an anomaly among 20th-century composers in that he managed to merge strident political content with gorgeous music without sounding didactic or preachy. His early worker's anthems, far from being mere propaganda, stand on their own as sophisticated compositions; they're pocket symphonies that you can sing along with. Eisler cut his teeth studying with Schoenberg in the early 1920s, but soon thereafter broke with his teacher, feeling that his high-minded dodecaphony alienated the working man. The irony, however, was that Eisler never totally abandoned these high-art tendencies, instead subtly incorporating them into everything he did. Like Kurt Weill, Eisler's political proclivities brought him into contact with Bertolt Brecht and the two became close collaborators for many years. Deutsche Sinfonie, written in the mid-30s, finds them paired in one of Eisler's more conservative orchestral settings, blatantly tipping its hat to the 12-tone crew. In this group of vocal pieces, Brecht's lyrics remain scathing, once again slyly subverting the concert hall tradition in true Eisler style. --Kenneth Goldsmith

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
Hanns Eisler (1898-1962) is probably best-known for his communist politics, and as a composer, best-known for his lieder, many of them settings of poems by Bertolt Brecht. This "Deutsche Symphonie op. 50" is his longest work, and it too features Brecht's incomparable poetry as well as Eisler's uniquely populist 12-tone music.

Eisler was from Vienna, and studied with Schoenberg after serving in the Great War, during the period when Schoenberg developed 12-tone music. Eisler remained committed to the form throughout his life, but adapted it to music that was aimed at a mass audience of workers. Eisler broke with Schoenberg and became actively involved with the German DKP (Communist Party) in Berlin during the Weimar Republic years when the Left battled the Nazis as they grew in strength. Eisler fled Germany in 1933 when the Nazis seized power. He began the "Deutsche Symphonie" in 1935, originally centered on two Brecht poems: "To the fighters in the concentration camps" and "Burial of the trouble-maker in a zinc coffin." It was originally sub-titled "The Concentration Camp Symphony." The vocal parts were finished by 1937, but Eisler continued to add parts and change the structure. Two instrumental movements were added, including the the 11-minute "Allegro for orchestra" that follows the climactic "Arbeiterkantate (Song of the class enemy)," and so it was not finally completed until 1957, and first performed in 1959 in the DDR (East Germany), where Eisler settled after being run out of America in 1947 by McCarthy's witch-hunt.

The "Deutsche Sinfonie" is a great and powerful work, but one clearly of another time. It takes time to enter the world of its creators, the apocalyptic world of fascism and the militant fight against it.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A powerful musical document of darkness,struggle & hope 4 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is the first studio recording of this important neglected work. Last year was The Eisler Centenary (1898-1998), and we found The American Symphony in New York giving the U.S premiere.Eisler's musical language knows no equal in uniting the complexities of images, of words with music. He is like the unknown Schubert of our time. And he has had vigorous challenge in Brecht who wrote the text here. This musical monument works best as a cantata than an oratorio-like symphonie. Eisler's musical phrases work best with short terse declamations and dark lyrical lines. And here we have a multi-movement work with shifting emphasis between solo moments,choral declamation to pure instrumental interludes. One movement entitled "Concentration Camp" forshadowed the darkest pages of European history. Eisler's music moves slowly,lugubriously not pleased with the state of the world the music waits for violence or struggle here with not quite triumphant fragments of the song "The International". Zagrosek with clean precision unites the formidable forces, with clear impassioned solo work and seemless orchestral playing.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A monumental work by a miniaturist 3 May 2000
By Andrew G. Lang - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
German composer Hanns Eisler is sometimes dismissed by his critics as a "miniaturist"--a gifted composer of songs, film scores, stage music and tightly-structured chamber pieces who was incapable of larger-scale orchestral works. This was partly the result of Eisler's theory of "applied music"--music should "climb down from its lofty heights" and take part in life's struggles. For Eisler, that meant music for the radical worker's movement in Europe before the Second World War, and particularly music for the new technologies of radio, sound film and recording. Both content and form dictated Eisler's style, which tended to produce concentrated bursts of meaning through carefully constructed forms.
The "German Symphony" on this album--recorded by the famous Leipzig Gewandhaus--shows that Eisler could indeed write for large musical forces. But the symphony's 11 movements are more of a series of cantatas than an integrated choral symphony. Still, the effect is impressive, and the opening Praeludium is one of the finest products of Eisler's generation of exiles from Nazi-dominated Europe. It is a powerful cry of protest, to words by Bertolt Brecht, against the spiritual and physical destruction of their German homeland.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing performance of Eisler & Brecht's great anti-fascist cantata 19 May 2011
By Autonomeus - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Hanns Eisler (1898-1962) is probably best-known for his communist politics, and as a composer, best-known for his lieder, many of them settings of poems by Bertolt Brecht. This "Deutsche Symphonie op. 50" is his longest work, and it too features Brecht's incomparable poetry as well as Eisler's uniquely populist 12-tone music.

Eisler was from Vienna, and studied with Schoenberg after serving in the Great War, during the period when Schoenberg developed 12-tone music. Eisler remained committed to the form throughout his life, but adapted it to music that was aimed at a mass audience of workers. Eisler broke with Schoenberg and became actively involved with the German DKP (Communist Party) in Berlin during the Weimar Republic years when the Left battled the Nazis as they grew in strength. Eisler fled Germany in 1933 when the Nazis seized power. He began the "Deutsche Symphonie" in 1935, originally centered on two Brecht poems: "To the fighters in the concentration camps" and "Burial of the trouble-maker in a zinc coffin." It was originally sub-titled "The Concentration Camp Symphony." The vocal parts were finished by 1937, but Eisler continued to add parts and change the structure. Two instrumental movements were added, including the the 11-minute "Allegro for orchestra" that follows the climactic "Arbeiterkantate (Song of the class enemy)," and so it was not finally completed until 1957, and first performed in 1959 in the DDR (East Germany), where Eisler settled after being run out of America in 1947 by McCarthy's witch-hunt.

The "Deutsche Sinfonie" is a great and powerful work, but one clearly of another time. It takes time to enter the world of its creators, the apocalyptic world of fascism and the militant fight against it. When Eisler began composing the work he was in exile, tirelessly agitating against the Nazi regime. His music had been rooted among the workers, and he utilized popular forms. This of course no longer comes across at all. It is interesting to speculate as to whether Eisler would have turned to the use of rock music as a vehicle for his political music had he lived on into the rock era. There is a tension in Eisler's music and his life between his lofty intellectual ambition and his fierce ethical commitment to social justice. But the "Deutsche Sinfonie" has power, and it culminates in the "Song of the class enemy," a 15-minute movement with a fierce, moving libretto by Brecht and a stunning melodic score by Eisler.

Unfortunately this is a disappointing performance. It is the first one I heard, and some time passed before I decided to try another recording, which was *much* better and convinced me that the problem here is with the performance and not with the composition. This disc was recorded for Decca in 1995 in Leipzig by a former-DDR orchestra, the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, with Lothar Zagrosek conducting, and the Ernst Senff Chor of Berlin, led by Sigurd Brauns. It is difficult to identify exactly what it is that goes wrong -- the timing is very similar to that of the much better Berlin Classics performance by the Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Berlin led by Max Pommer, recorded in 1987. But it seems as though Zagrosek and his forces are trying too hard, and the result is that it sounds affected and distorted. The earlier recording, from the DDR before the Wall fell, sounds more classical, more restrained, and in this case less is more. The playing also sounds more precise, and the singing is more natural, more like a workers' choir instead of an operatic choir.

All in all I would strongly recommend the Berlin Classics recording over this one. It is one of those cases where you might not realize you were listening to one of the great works of the 20th century if you heard the wrong recording. There is one crucial advantage to this Decca disc, though -- it includes the libretto in English. The power of the work is lost without Brecht's great poetry, and the Berlin Classics disc has only German. So if you take my advice and buy the Berlin Classics disc, you are going to need to find the libretto somewhere!

For more Eisler, or as an alternative introduction, I strongly recommend Heiner Goebbels's assembly of his music called Eislermaterial (see my review), which contains several of the songs he wrote based on Brecht's poems, as well as several instrumental works, all woven together.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eisler 27 Nov 2011
By Hamel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Eisler a réalisé quelques compositions qui méritent le détour, en particulier le Hollywood Songbook (version par Goerne magnifique) et cette symphonie, ici, dans une interprétation peut-être idéale
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