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Edward Hopper Hardcover – 15 Feb 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Skira Editore (15 Feb. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8857202836
  • ISBN-13: 978-8857202839
  • Product Dimensions: 28.8 x 3.4 x 30.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 147,977 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
... everything was too beautiful and from his standpoint unpaintable." Hum! And so what happens? His wife Jo packed his watercolor kit for him to go out, and later found him in the nearby (Santa Fe) railroad yard painting a locomotive. The author, Lloyd Goodrich, who personally knew Edward Hopper, provides numerous anecdotes such as the above to enrich this work. But the real reasons to purchase this oversize book are the reproductions of the paintings and the sketches. They are numerous and of high quality. I must confess to having purchases this premium work from the "remainder table" in a local bookstore (in Atlanta) in the mid-90's, for, well, not very much. The heartbreak of any author: a lot of hard work, and then to see it thrown in the discard pile, and sold by weight.

Hopper was born in Nyack, New York in 1882, and died in his apartment, on Washington Square, NYC, in 1967. His early training as a painter was in... no surprise... France, before "The Great War," yet the various movements, from Impressionism, Cubism, et al., did not seem to directly impact his style. He did appreciate the beauty of the country, and told the author that "...after France the United States seemed `a chaos of ugliness.'" Yet he "settled down" in America, and became one the quintessential American painters, with a vision that chose to document the commonplace urban and rural scenes. As Goodrich says: "....all the sweltering, tawdry life of the American small town, and behind all, the sad desolation of our suburban landscape. He derives daily stimulus from these, that others flee from or pass with indifference."

He married Jo, in 1925, who was almost always the nude model for his paintings. They appeared to be soul mates, and their marriage lasted 42 years until his death.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Aug. 1998
Format: Hardcover
Most comprehensive single volume regarding Hopper and his work, that I am aware of, and the reprints of the work are accurate and true to the originals. A significant book about a significant painter.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
What an experience 16 Jan. 2005
By wiredweird - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Edward Hopper is best known for his urban, moody paintings. He painted traditional rural landscapes, and seaside scenes along the New Englad coast, too. What he captured best, though, was urban life in the 1940s.

He seems to have caught it all, the bridges, trains, opera, and tenements, at every hour of day and night. And very often he captured someone, often a woman, in a moment of solitude. These scenes border on voyeurism, the unguarded moments when his subjects might be dressed, or partly, or not - with no one to dress for, it hardly matters. There is nothing erotic in these nudes and semi-nudes. In fact, I quite like the unposed, unpoised relaxation of the moment. Hopper is quite capable of showing a female figure as strong and desirable, as in "Office at Night" or "Summer Evening" I sympathize more with the figures who have no one to pose for; they seem more honest somehow.

People say that many of his paintings are about loneliness, and that may be true. I think more of them are about solitude, or separation, or the invisible walls that people erect to keep themselves sane in the urban crush. In "Two on the Aisle," as in so many paintings of two or more people, the two parties seem barely aware of each other. Even within the couple, they scarcely look at each other, as if long familiarity means there's nothing new to see.

Of 246 paintings reproduced here, only 88 are in color. They are well printed, and capture Hopper's generally subdued palette. They are just enough to make me greedy, though, and to wish I could see more in the colors that Hopper gave them. There's a lot of work here, including a number of etchings, from Hopper's earlier ouvre as well. I don't mean to neglect those works, but his 40s and 50s pieces have an incredible power over me.

The commentary occupies about half the book, and gives real insight into Hopper's life. I have to admit, I skimmed the words, only dipping into them occasionally. That just gives me more reason (as if I needed reason) to come back again. And again and again.

This book really is beautiful. If more of it were in color, it would have the highest praise I know how to give.

//wiredweird.
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Comprehensive in scope, accurate in plates. 14 Aug. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Most comprehensive single volume regarding Hopper and his work, that I am aware of, and the reprints of the work are accurate and true to the originals. A significant book about a significant painter.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
"At first Hopper was miserable in New Mexico... 6 Oct. 2014
By John P. Jones III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
... everything was too beautiful and from his standpoint unpaintable." Hum! And so what happens? His wife Jo packed his watercolor kit for him to go out, and later found him in the nearby (Santa Fe) railroad yard painting a locomotive. The author, Lloyd Goodrich, who personally knew Edward Hopper, provides numerous anecdotes such as the above to enrich this work. But the real reasons to purchase this oversize book are the reproductions of the paintings and the sketches. They are numerous and of high quality. I must confess to having purchases this premium work from the "remainder table" in a local bookstore (in Atlanta) in the mid-90's, for, well, not very much. The heartbreak of any author: a lot of hard work, and then to see it thrown in the discard pile, and sold by weight.

Hopper was born in Nyack, New York in 1882, and died in his apartment, on Washington Square, NYC, in 1967. His early training as a painter was in... no surprise... France, before "The Great War," yet the various movements, from Impressionism, Cubism, et al., did not seem to directly impact his style. He did appreciate the beauty of the country, and told the author that "...after France the United States seemed `a chaos of ugliness.'" Yet he "settled down" in America, and became one the quintessential American painters, with a vision that chose to document the commonplace urban and rural scenes. As Goodrich says: "....all the sweltering, tawdry life of the American small town, and behind all, the sad desolation of our suburban landscape. He derives daily stimulus from these, that others flee from or pass with indifference."

He married Jo, in 1925, who was almost always the nude model for his paintings. They appeared to be soul mates, and their marriage lasted 42 years until his death. His paintings portray characters who are both isolated and alienated. I checked every painting, and not a single character is smiling. Many are looking out a window, longing, for that day that will change their world? The color tones are heavier, and more somber than the lighter ones used by the Impressionists. As the author says, Hopper eschewed the dramatic skylines of NYC, preferring to paint the exhaust vents on his own Washington Square roof. He also painted rural scenes, but usually included an isolated building. Travel was woven into numerous themes, via the depiction of railroad tracks, and one of his most famous paintings has no humans; rather it is a Victorian gothic house next to railroad tracks. His birthplace of Nyack was famous for building yachts, and it instilled a lifetime interest in boats and the sea. So, in addition to urban and rural America, he has numerous paintings based on his long summers on the New England coast.

"Nighthawks" is justifiable his most famous painting and it adorns the cover. Alienation, and waiting, in spades. Hopper is deeply associated with the America of the `20's, to the `50's, so much so that I sent a picture of a house from that era taken here in Albuquerque to a foreign friend who said: it looks like an Edward Hopper painting!

A critical question though: Would I want an Edward Hopper painting on my living room wall for daily viewing? Like Diane Arbus, the photographer, I find both their works compelling, but only in selective doses. So, I think not, but find this book an essential part of my library, as I too stare out the window from time to time, wondering when... And at the current prices being charged by Amazon secondary sellers (16 cents!!) it could and should be part of anyone's library. 5-stars.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Edward Hopper 6 Jan. 2011
By Stephen Quinn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A gorgeous book with a well-written, informative and enjoyable text. Obviously I wish there could be more color in the book--but it's an older book and they couldn't do as much color then, and I doubt that could be upgraded for a reprint edition at half the price.

The size is a great factor, too--the book is huge and you get the feeling you're looking at the actual size watercolors in that part of the book.
11 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Expression of American Monotonous Suburban Life 5 May 2003
By Burak Kilic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I came across Hopper's paintings, when I was doing reproductions of famous artists as my partial work in high school. They immediately caught my attention and excitement, as they had an odd quality, which no other painters had in their work. Vast spaces, empty streets, newly-woke-up ladies in old-fashion motel rooms, extreme light conditions that contradicted the monotonousness in some way... These are some of the major images one is apt to see in Hopper's works.
Hopper's paintings seem to depict the 20s-40s of America, in the context of local towns, cafes, old rooms, within the frame of realism. He's usually painted his figures in an alignment, that does not let us see their faces nor fronts. Instead, the sun has the right to see them, which casts bright light rays into dark rooms.
I think that Hopper seems to be content with the way of living in America, and how people of it carry on their lives. The paintings may indicate some not-so-happy situations, but they do not depict depression. Therefore, I think that Hopper is the best representative of American culture in the early twentieth century in that sense.
I haven't purchased the book yet; but had a chance to look at it in the school's library. The book contains many of his paintings, and Goodrich's comments show some level of apprehension and knowledge of Hopper's work. It is concise and comprehensive, and I recommend it to everybody. Hopper is certainly one of the most affective artists of the twentieth century and all times.
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