Edward Heath: The Authorised Biography and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Edward Heath: The Authori... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Edward Heath: The Authorised Biography Paperback – 15 Sep 2011

13 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.99
£1.49 £0.01
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

Edward Heath: The Authorised Biography + Edward Heath: A Biography
Price For Both: £19.99

One of these items is dispatched sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPress (15 Sept. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007247419
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007247417
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 4.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 174,468 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

‘Written with the style, grace and polish that one has come to expect from Ziegler…the great strength of the book lies in its grasp of Heath’s psychology and of the psychology of political leadership.’ Times Literary Supplement

‘The best biography of the year was Philip Ziegler’s rather straight-faced life of Edward Heath.’ Spectator

’The finest political biography of the year was Philip Ziegler’s meticulous and beautifully written Edward Heath, which got beneath the skin of sometimes perverse, often pompous and always enigmatic prime minister’ Rod Liddle, Sunday Times

‘The non-fiction book I enjoyed most this year was Philip Ziegler’s masterly biography of Edward Heath.’ Antonia Fraser, Daily Telegraph

‘[An] elegant, compelling and devastating study’ Sunday Times

‘Philip Ziegler has produced a convincing account of Ted Heath’s defeat at history’s hands…anyone who is interested in British politics, or in the demeaning weaknesses of almost-great men, will find it a compelling read’ Wall Street Journal

About the Author

Philip Ziegler was born in 1929 and educated at Eton and New College, Oxford, where he gained first class honours in Jurisprudence. He then joined the Diplomatic Service and served in Vientiane, Paris, Pretoria and Bogota before joining the publishers William Collins, where he was editorial director for fifteen years. His many books include biographies of William IV, Lady Diana Cooper, Louis Mountbatten and Harold Wilson, as well as the classic history of the Black Death.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Penelope Pitstop on 9 July 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Often political biographies which criticise their subject are curiously dull - Young's biography of Baldwin being the supreme example; this is the exception to the rule. If you thought Heath was an unfeeling and rather unpleasant man obsessed with himself to the exclusion of others, this books shows that you were far from right - he was much worse than that. Ziegler is one of our best biographers, but this is his best book. He never really understood the Labour Party, which vitiated his study of Wilson, but he does understand the Tories, and this makes the book a joy. Teddy Heath was a cold fish from the start and remained that until the end. He is good on exploding the mythology which Heath used to describe his own career, and his Oxford days are presented as the triumph of the will they undoubtedly were. Heath was Widmerpool, without the originality which turned him mad at the end. He was one of the worst prime ministers of our time, but he was also, to judge by this, quite as ghastly as his worst enemies thought. Intellectually incurious and morally obtuse, he saw no problem in defending the excesses of a Chinese regime which rewarded him well. His account of the 'long sulk' is a joy - only a deeply solipsistic man could have failed to see that the only person damaged by this was himself. Woe to the country whose leaders are like this. A brilliant and successful biography of a limited and unsuccessful man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paulpeter on 20 Aug. 2010
Format: Hardcover
I came to this book having a fairly preconceived bias against Heath : my dominant memories of him being the monumental sulk at his loss of the Tory leadership, and his seemingly deranged hatred of Thatcher ! I think this book paints a more sympathetic picture of the man - his humble background, Oxford and his competence and popularity as a war time army officer.His strong pro EEC beliefs stemmed from genuine horror of war, and his patchy record as Prime Minister has to be viewed against the backdrop of the quite exceptional trade union intransigence of the period.His signing of the Sunningdale agreement in Northern Ireland was over twenty years before its time, but think of the lives that would be saved if other heads as wise as his were to the fore at that time. I am just an ordinary reader, interested in history and politics, and found this biography to be an accessible and enjoyable experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Although this is the "authorised" biography of Heath and although the author had worked for Heath as a young man, his first hand sources are from Heath's massive archive and collection of papers (he claimed never to have thrown anything away since he was 14), rather than from a series of interviews with the subject: the authorisation was from Heath's estate, rather than the former PM himself. Making use of the extensive source material, Ziegler has painstakingly constructed Heath's life and career as Heath himself saw it, whilst also providing his own commentary in order to inject balance into the narrative. It's a sensitively written book, with beautiful prose, and he creates (in the mind of this reviewer, at least) a portrayal of a dedicated and very focused politician who was convinced that he, and only he, was right on the big issues of the day, particularly Europe and the UK economy in the early 1970s, but who also famously was incapable of forming any kind of warm relationships with anybody. In some ways it's a sad portrayal, and in others one is left thinking that Heath really was his own worst enemy. Altogether, this is a fascinating biography which is well worth a read for anyone interested in modern Britain.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By HBH on 25 Feb. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Edward Heath by Philip Ziegler is a good book about the man who was a pretty unsuccessful Prime Minister during a tumultuous period from 1970-74. It is well-written, interesting and detailed although it does suffer from a problem quite common to authorised biographies in that it is a little too sympathetic to the subject. However, the figure who emerges in the work is still a rather unlikeable figure who was rude and at times arrogant and held a grudge against the woman and the people who helped her to replace him. Nevertheless, this work also shows that Heath managed to use his inteligence and abilities to become PM and then achieve the seemingly impossible of getting Britain into Europe. All in all this is a good book if a little too sympathetic to an unlikeable figure whose premiership ended in disaster.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dalgety on 4 Feb. 2011
Format: Hardcover
This biography reads easily and is written in Zeiglers usual elegant stle - it comprehensively covers Heaths life from birth to death.However, what emerges from this book is that Zeigler actually dislikes Heath.Full credit is given to Heaths political successes- but as a person Heath emerges as an arrogant, self-opiniated "mummys boy"- who cared about nobody but himself. Even Mrs. Thatcher appears warm and human compared to the cold and disdainful Heath.Even the few personal friends that he did have seem to have been semi-estranged from him by the end of his life-largely due to the off-hand way they were treated.Only in the last few pages does the author evoke any sympathy for his subject- depicting a lonely old man sitting in pubs in Salisbury-with only his paid employees for company-of course , Heath ,himself was responsible for this situation.Mrs .Thatcher said on seeing a woman who had been in love with an unresponsive Heath in her youth-"Impossible -that cannot be true- nobody could love Ted Heath!".-Let that be Heaths epitaph.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback