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Edgar Allan Poe: The Complete Poems (Library of Classic Poets) [Hardcover]

Edgar Allan Poe
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

1 April 1994 Library of Classic Poets
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) is internationally renowned as a pioneering master of the macabre. He is regarded as one of the world's great short story writers as well as a great lyric poet, and is credited with inventing the detective story and the modern gothic horror tale. He has been an important influence on many major American and European writers including William Faulkner, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, H.P. Lovecraft, and William Butler Yeats, among many others.
Poe's poetry, which is collected in this volume, is more personal than his prose. The themes of love, death, and despair which recur throughout reflect the anguish he suffered in his own troubled life. "Annabel Lee" is a haunting lament to his young wife, Virginia, who died of tuberculosis. "The Bells" is an eerie and melancholy meditation which recreates with brilliant musical language the hypnotic, funereal aura of ringing bells. "The Raven" is a comic tour de force in which the protagonist turns his strange visitor into a symbol of his own sorrow and loss. Poe's best poems remain some of the most popular and technically accomplished in the English language.
This book features a deluxe cover, ribbon marker, top stain, and decorative endpaper with a name plate.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 165 pages
  • Publisher: Gramercy,US; New edition edition (1 April 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517082454
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517082454
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 14 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 905,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston in 1809, the son of itinerant actors who left him an orphan in 1811. He became a ward of Richmond merchant John Allan and from 1815 to 1820 lived with the family in London. Upon his return, Poe received schooling in Richmond before attending the University of Virginia for a year. In 1827, he clashed with Allan and left for Boston, where he joined the army and published a slender volume, Tamerlane and Other Poems. He later attended the US Military Academy until his dismissal in 1831. The poet moved to Baltimore and began writing for magazines in 1832: three years later he secured a position with the Southern Literary Messenger in Richmond and married his cousin, Virginia Clemm. Relocating in New York, Poe endured great hardship but in 1838 published his only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. In October 1849, he collapsed in Baltimore and died in hospital.

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Review

"Mabbott's full-dress edition of the poems ... carries the authority of having been done from first to last by the one scholar best equipped to do it." -- Times Literary Supplement "Mabbott was recognized as unquestionably the dean of all Poe authorities, in the sweep and depth of his scholarly expertise in a class by himself... The Poems is almost unimaginably complete." -- Southern Literary Journal "Massive and important... There is something for everyone, be he novice or intelligent layman, student or specialist." -- American Literature --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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First Sentence
We know that Poe wrote verses as a schoolboy, but the exact date when he began the practice is uncertain. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful collection of poems 7 May 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
The book "Poems Of Edgar Allan Poe", contains thirty one works by Edgar Allan Poe. Ranging from sonnets of love to personal depiction's and morbid descripive poems. Such selections as "The Raven", "Lenore", "Annabel Lee", "To Helen", and my favorite poem "Alone" are included in "Poems Of Edgar Allan Poe". Poe's poetry is a beautiful display of human nature and emotion. The poetry portrays his abstract look at the world, especially in the poem "Alone" where a sympathetic nature arises in readers from understanding exactly what he poetically writes. With Poe's descriptions of being an odd child during his youth, readers empathize with him and understand his sadness. Give Poe's work a try you may find a strange connection of your own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Most people know that Edgar Allen Poe wrote poetry. Of course, you'd be hard-pressed to make them quote a line that doesn't involve ravens.

Well, it's time for some poetry homework -- "The Raven" is neither Poe's most beautiful nor his most striking poem. That is reserved for other, more obscure works in Poe's "Complete Poetry" -- and while one might expect the ghostly or macabre to be all throughout his work, it's also filled with transcendent beauty, wistfulness, and some truly amazing wordwork.

Over his lifetime, Poe tried out many styles -- there are sonnets, short hymns, long rambling odes written in dramatic, vaguely Shakespearean style ("O, human love! thou spirit given/On Earth, of all we hope in Heaven!"), acrostics, little exercises in self-reflection, a lyrical song or two, and some haunting stories rendered in verse like the bittersweet "Annabel Lee."

And the content of these poems is just as diverse. Some of them are distinctly dark -- sunken cities, tolling bells, haunted palaces, thoughts on the lingering spirits of the dead, abandoned valleys, and loved ones that have been stolen away by death (" I pray to God that she may lie/For ever with unopened eye/While the pale sheeted ghosts go by!"). And yes, it has the one about a midnight dreary, and a creepy raven with eyes like "a demon's that is dreaming."

And there are a lot of moments of beauty -- lush descriptions of nature, bittersweet dreams, love for a beautiful girl, and elfin odes to those who "put out the star-light/With the breath from their pale faces/About twelve by the moon-dial...
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not What I Was Expecting!! 8 July 2013
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The description of the product was "used - very good" - with no visible damage. However, the cover was ripped and stained, and the product not the edition described on the site...not what I was expecting!
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Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful collection of poems 7 May 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The book "Poems Of Edgar Allan Poe", contains thirty one works by Edgar Allan Poe. Ranging from sonnets of love to personal depiction's and morbid descripive poems. Such selections as "The Raven", "Lenore", "Annabel Lee", "To Helen", and my favorite poem "Alone" are included in "Poems Of Edgar Allan Poe". Poe's poetry is a beautiful display of human nature and emotion. The poetry portrays his abstract look at the world, especially in the poem "Alone" where a sympathetic nature arises in readers from understanding exactly what he poetically writes. With Poe's descriptions of being an odd child during his youth, readers empathize with him and understand his sadness. Give Poe's work a try you may find a strange connection of your own.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Poetry, but No Introduction, Footnotes or Commentary 14 Jun 2004
By Michael Wischmeyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The Raven, Annabel Lee, Eldorado, The City in the Sea, and The Bells are commonly found in anthologies, but much of Poe's poetry is not widely read today. I enjoyed this inexpensive introduction (published by Barnes and Noble Books) to Poe's poetry, but I was disappointed by the absence of an introduction, footnotes, and commentary. The poems are apparently arranged chronologically from 1827 to 1840; Poe's best known poems are in the latter half.

Poe's best poetry is marked by creativity and innovation, sometimes unexpectedly transitioning from a theme of love and beauty to one of despair and death. I consider The City in the Sea, The Sleeper, The Valley of the Unrest, The Haunted Palace, The Conqueror Worm, For Annie, and Annabel Lee to be among the best examples of Poe's imaginative, haunting descriptions of death and dying.

Poe's early poetry, and some of his later works, are reminiscent of English romantic poetry. At his own expense Poe printed his first book, Tamerlane and Other Poems (1827). Poe's style in these earliest poems - Tamerlane, Song, Dreams, Spirits of the Dead, Evening Star, A Dream Within a Dream, Stanzas, A Dream, The Happiest Day --- The Happiest Hour, and The Lake - is characterized by lyrical descriptions, flowery language, and romantic themes.

I enjoyed the long poem Tamerlane. Tamerlane (or Tamburlaine, or Timur), a Tartar warrior of the fourteenth century, had amassed an immense empire, and was now reflecting on a distant, but not forgotten, youthful love. Following legend, Poe supposes that Tamerlane was born a lowly peasant, but it is more likely that he was descendant of the famous Khans. (In 1996 the newly independent Uzbekistan celebrated the 660th anniversary of the birth of Timur Khan.)

As in The Raven, Poe often employed refrains in later poems. We see Poe experimenting with this poetic technique in one of his earliest efforts, the lyrical poem titled Song. Spirits of the Dead is a contemplative look at death, not a poem of terror. A Dream Within a Dream questions reality itself.

I had more difficulty with the lengthy, early poem Al Aaraaf. This romantic fantasy portrays a visitation from a distant world "near four bright suns" to our lovely Earth, the home of the "Idea of Beauty".

Two poems, An Enigma and A Valentine, challenge the reader to uncover hidden names within the poetry itself. (They reminded me of Poe's secret code in his mystery The Gold Bug.) I have yet to unravel either riddle.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a world of solemn thought their monody compels! 15 July 2009
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Library Binding
Most people know that Edgar Allen Poe wrote poetry. Of course, you'd be hard-pressed to make them quote a line that doesn't involve ravens.

Well, it's time for some poetry homework -- "The Raven" is neither Poe's most beautiful nor his most striking poem. That is reserved for other, more obscure works in Poe's "Complete Poetry" -- and while one might expect the ghostly or macabre to be all throughout his work, it's also filled with transcendent beauty, wistfulness, and some truly amazing wordwork.

Over his lifetime, Poe tried out many styles -- there are sonnets, short hymns, long rambling odes written in dramatic, vaguely Shakespearean style ("O, human love! thou spirit given/On Earth, of all we hope in Heaven!"), acrostics, little exercises in self-reflection, a lyrical song or two, and some haunting stories rendered in verse like the bittersweet "Annabel Lee."

And the content of these poems is just as diverse. Some of them are distinctly dark -- sunken cities, tolling bells, haunted palaces, thoughts on the lingering spirits of the dead, abandoned valleys, and loved ones that have been stolen away by death (" I pray to God that she may lie/For ever with unopened eye/While the pale sheeted ghosts go by!"). And yes, it has the one about a midnight dreary, and a creepy raven with eyes like "a demon's that is dreaming."

And there are a lot of moments of beauty -- lush descriptions of nature, bittersweet dreams, love for a beautiful girl, and elfin odes to those who "put out the star-light/With the breath from their pale faces/About twelve by the moon-dial..." But in many of these, Poe manages to add a melancholy atmosphere -- just look at "Bridal Ballad," whose narrator assures us that she is happy, but who is haunted by the "dead who is forsaken," her former lover.

Yeah, Poe's verse tends to be about as cheerful as his best known fiction, and often with some of the same preoccupations. He was a little less successful in verse at times, as occasionally you get some very strained verse schemes, like the terribly awkward "Eulalie" ("Now Doubt - now Pain/Come never again/For her soul gives me sigh for sigh").

But like his stories, Poe's poems are spun out of exquisite, dreamlike words that can sometimes evolve into nightmares. This guy could evoke everything from ghosts to fairy-tales, brides to wormlike horrors. Even the more sentimental moments have a dark edge ("Oh, may her sleep/As it is lasting, so be deep!/Soft may the worms about her creep!"). And he also wraps his verse in some truly beautiful natural metaphors -- ancient forests, flowers, misty moons, and many other beautiful touches.

And Poe's poetry even allows a window into his own mind at times, most painfully expressed as "from childhood's hour I have not been/As others were -- I have not seen/As others saw -- I could not bring/My passions from a common spring..." and the "mystery which binds me still."

For anyone who can appreciate his exquisite use of words, the "Complete Poetry of Edgar Allen Poe" is a must-read -- full of dark, meditative little gems and exquisite language.
5.0 out of 5 stars The best collection of Poe's poetry available 26 May 2013
By thediener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A previous reviewer was wrong when he said there are no introductions or notes in this book. This book has extensive notes, references and introductions by Mabbott (one of the most highly regarded Poe scholars ever to live). His notes, comments, and references pull together a range of esoteric sources and back-story behind Poe's work that is almost incredible. I highly recommend all three of Mabbott's books on Poe. The biographical sketch of Poe included in this volume is exceedingly useful as it can be read quickly and referenced easily for quick review when trying to remember the sequence of major events in Poe's life. Mabbott makes clear much that is confusing to modern readers when tackling Poe's place in antebellum America. Poe revised many of his works numerous times and Mabbott's selection of which version of each story should be considered the standard has basically been universally adopted by scholars. Also this particular printing is remarkably free of errors. I will say however that Mabbott was not correct in every aspect (he's only human though). For example, in his commentary on Ulalume he asserts that the setting of the poem is Halloween night. There is no actual evidence for this in the poem. The "night of all nights in the year" is not Halloween as he asserts, rather it becomes obvious to the reader by the end of the poem that that line is mere foreshadowing of the fact that it is the one year anniversary of the burial of Ulalume. Regardless, if you can only buy one collection of Poe's work, then the only good option is Mabbott! You won't regret it. However, if you go that distance, then you will also want to consider getting Burton Pollin's works on Poe also for a more complete understanding of Poe and his written corpus.
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful edition to anyone's collection 30 July 2012
By Cynthia E - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
If you have never read anything (short story or poem) by Edgar Allan Poe, I would suggest starting with this book. You may find that many of Poe's poems strange, depressing, or just downright weird. Some of them strike me that way as well. However, this collection contains some poems that MUST be read. My all time favorite by Poe is The Raven, which is included in this book. Others that I feel are worth mentioning are: Annabel Lee, A Dream Within a Dream, Serenade, The Sleeper, Romance, and Evening Star.
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