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Economic Sanctions and American Diplomacy (Critical America) Paperback – 1 Jun 1998


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Product details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Council on Foreign Relations Press (1 Jun. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0876092121
  • ISBN-13: 978-0876092125
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,855,390 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Synopsis

Draws on eight country studies to present lessons to be learned from the American use of economic sanctions in the post-Cold War era, and provides guidelines designed to shape future decisions by Congress and the executive branch. Each chapter analyzes the voice of domestic constituencies in shaping US sanctions policy, the legal authority invoked

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book analyzes all the major cases of the use of economic sanctions by the United States since the end of the cold war (Iraq, Iran, Cuba, Libya, Haiti, Pakistan, China, etc.). It explains what you can expect from this tool of foreign policy, when it should be used, and why it has (unfortunately) become the knee-jerk response of the country to any and every foreign policy crisis. If only politicians read books...
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By A Customer on 24 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
This work illuminates the worst of American diplomacy. Sanctions have become a substitute for thinking among policymakers. Jesse Helms should read it.
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Format: Paperback
Not much to say; this is fantastic. I couldn't put it down. What every politician, scholar and citizen should read.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
the best thing written on economic sanctions 4 Aug. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book analyzes all the major cases of the use of economic sanctions by the United States since the end of the cold war (Iraq, Iran, Cuba, Libya, Haiti, Pakistan, China, etc.). It explains what you can expect from this tool of foreign policy, when it should be used, and why it has (unfortunately) become the knee-jerk response of the country to any and every foreign policy crisis. If only politicians read books...
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
sanctions: not a fix-all 23 Feb. 2005
By EriKa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The unfortunate part about books such as these is that they are out of date before you read them, and as years go by, they lose much of their contemporary relevance. The book devotes entire chapters to economic sanctions in place against Yugoslavia, and the Yugoslavian sanctions are long over, while Libya (though sanctions against it lasted for a very long time) only recently emerged from the shadow of the sanctions placed against it. I would like to know, for example, what one can derive from the end of these sanctions (which were still in place when the book was written.) One would hope that a newer edition would address these matters. This book was not intended as a primer for interested spectators, though, it was intended as a study for more instructive purposes (to make recommendations to those in a position to employ sanctions).

The book excels in illustrating the unpredictable and often volatile and even disastrous nature of imposing sanctions. So often, sanctions are used without any understanding of what they will do. Sanctions are an understudied, overused tool whose effects on intended targets/populations are not fully understood or appreciated. Sanctions will, of course, have different effects in different places, and employing them as a fix-all, blanket cure (choosing to do SOMETHING, rather than doing nothing or engaging in some kind of combat) will often lead to unfortunate, if unintended, side effects. Too often, sanctions have been employed as a "quick answer" to make it seem as though the US is doing something other than making idle threats, even if it is not actively engaged. Unfortunately this policy of hands-off engagement has done more harm than good because no time has been invested in investigating the outcome of the sanctions on a country-by-country basis.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Jesse Helms should read it 24 Nov. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This work illuminates the worst of American diplomacy. Sanctions have become a substitute for thinking among policymakers. Jesse Helms should read it.
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