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Ecofeminism (critique influence change) [Kindle Edition]

Maria Mies , Vandana Shiva , Ariel Salleh
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

This groundbreaking work remains as relevant today as when it was when first published. Two of Zed’s best-known authors argue that ecological destruction and industrial catastrophes constitute a direct threat to everyday life, the maintenance of which has been made the particular responsibility of women. In both industrialized societies and the developing countries, the new wars the world is experiencing, violent ethnic chauvinisms and the malfunctioning of the economy also pose urgent questions for ecofeminists. Is there a relationship between patriarchal oppression and the destruction of nature in the name of profit and progress? How can women counter the violence inherent in these processes? Should they look to a link between the women’s movement and other social movements? Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva offer a thought-provoking analysis of these and many other issues from a unique North-South perspective. They critique prevailing economic theories, conventional concepts of women’s emancipation, the myth of ‘catching up’ development, the philosophical foundations of modern science and technology, and the omission of ethics when discussing so many questions, including advances in reproductive technology and biotechnology. In constructing their own ecofeminist epistemology and methodology, these two internationally respected feminist environmental activists look to the potential of movements advocating consumer liberation and subsistence production, sustainability and regeneration, and they argue for an acceptance of limits and reciprocity and a rejection of exploitation, the endless commoditization of needs, and violence.


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Review

Maria Mies is a Marxist feminist scholar who is renowned for her theory of capitalist-patriarchy, which recognizes third world women and difference. She is a professor of sociology at Cologne University of Applied Sciences, but retired from teaching in 1993. Since the late 1960s she has been involved with feminist activism. In 1979, at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, she founded the Women and Development programme. Mies has written books and articles that deal with topics relating to feminism, third world issues and the environment. Her other titles published by Zed Books include The Lace Makers of Narsapur (1982), Women: The Last Colony (1988), Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale (1999) and The Subsistence Perspective (1999).

Vandana Shiva, a world-renowned environmental leader and thinker, is director of the Research Foundation on Science, Technology, and Ecology. In 1993 Shiva won the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize and in 2010 was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize for her commitment to social justice. She is the author of over twenty books. Her other titles published by Zed Books are Staying Alive (1989), The Violence of the Green Revolution (1991), Biodiversity (1992), Monocultures of the Mind (1993), Biopolitics (1995), Stolen Harvest (2001), Protect or Plunder (2001), Earth Democracy (2005) and Soil Not Oil (2009). --Anne Stratham, Feminist Collections

About the Author

Maria Mies is a Marxist feminist scholar who is renowned for her theory of capitalist-patriarchy, which recognizes third world women and difference. She is a Professor of Sociology at Fachhochschule in Cologne, Germany, but retired from teaching in 1993. Since the late 1960s she has been involved with feminist activism. In 1979, at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, she founded the Women and Development program. Mies has written books and articles that deal with topics relating to feminism, third world issues and the environment. Her books include The Lace Makers of Narsapur (Zed Books, 1982), Woman the Last Colony (Zed Books, 1988), The Daughters of Development (Zed Books, 1998), Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale (Zed Books, 1999), The Subsistence Perspective (Zed Books, 1999)

Vandana Shiva is a world-renowned environmental leader and thinker. Director of the Research Foundation on Science, Technology, and Ecology. In 1993, Shiva won the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize and was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize for her commitment to social justice in 2010. She is the author of over 20 books including Staying Alive(Zed Books, 1989), The Violence of the Green Revolution (Zed Books, 1991), Biodiversity (Zed Books, 1992), Monocultures of the Mind (Zed Books, 1993), Biopolitics (Zed Books, 1995), Stolen Harvest (Zed Books, 2001), Protect or Plunder (Zed Books, 2001), Earth Democracy (Zed Books, 2005), Soil Not Oil (Zed Books, 2009)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 881 KB
  • Print Length: 344 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1856491560
  • Publisher: Zed Books; 2 edition (13 Mar. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00IR8VR86
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #488,984 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Defining Green feminism 18 Jun. 2002
Format:Paperback
Ecologism and feminism are two of the most important strands in political thought today. If you don't believe me, perhaps reading Mies and Shiva will change your mind.
There may be as many ways to combine ecologism and feminism as there are Green ideologues, but the argument of Mies and Shiva is most compelling. They explain, clearly, how paternalism and commodification have first excluded women and nature, then controlled them, then turned them into commercial products.
Although men are predominantly responsible for this violence, Mies and Shiva make it clear that they do not see men as the problem but rather the system that some men have created.
Ecologism is based on a holistic approach and Ecofeminism gives an all-encompassing analysis of the problems caused by capitalism and industrialization, particularly in regard to food and reproduction. At last, the unity of oppression to people and planet has been disseminated.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ecofeminists for life? 29 Jan. 2011
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
"Ecofeminism" by Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva is a collection of articles dealing with various aspects of ecofeminism, a relatively new and somewhat controversial philosophy. Ecofeminism isn't a simple combination of Green and feminist ideas. Rather, it's a very specific current, which often runs counter to more regular feminism.

The ecofeminists reject the Enlightenment, the bourgeois revolutions and modern individualism. They also attack modern science for its materialism and reductionism. Women are seen as closer to Nature, and ecofeminists therefore see a connection between patriarchal oppression of women and destruction of the environment. In terms of greenness, ecofeminists could be considered "dark greens" or "fundis", since they seem to reject the entire modern civilization in favour of a society based on subsistence agriculture. Strangely for dark greens, however, they don't consider overpopulation to be a problem.

While ecofeminism is regarded as left-wing (no doubt because of its anti-hierarchic perspective), its anti-Enlightenment, anti-science, communitarian and "organismic" perspective does have obvious affinities with a certain kind of conservative philosophies. And while Mies and Shiva nominally defend the right of abortion, they actually seem to vacillate on the issue. It would seem that they really oppose both abortion and modern contraception (including condoms) in favour of coitus interruptus. This is a very extreme position, reminiscent of certain religious groups. Curiously, there is a mostly-religious group in the United States called Feminists for Life (FFL) which explicitly opposes abortion and is neutral on contraception, no doubt in order to recruit Catholics.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ecofeminism 14 May 2010
Format:Hardcover
Old book, highlighted on many pages but I did not mind as it was useful for my uni studies. Great ideas for feminists.
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Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ecofeminists for life? 27 Aug. 2010
By Ashtar Command - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"Ecofeminism" by Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva is a collection of articles dealing with various aspects of ecofeminism, a relatively new and somewhat controversial philosophy. Ecofeminism isn't a simple combination of Green and feminist ideas. Rather, it's a very specific current, which often runs counter to more regular feminism.

The ecofeminists reject the Enlightenment, the bourgeois revolutions and modern individualism. They also attack modern science for its materialism and reductionism. Women are seen as closer to Nature, and ecofeminists therefore see a connection between patriarchal oppression of women and destruction of the environment. In terms of greenness, ecofeminists could be considered "dark greens" or "fundis", since they seem to reject the entire modern civilization in favour of a society based on subsistence agriculture. Strangely for dark greens, however, they don't consider overpopulation to be a problem.

While ecofeminism is regarded as left-wing (no doubt because of its anti-hierarchic perspective), its anti-Enlightenment, anti-science, communitarian and "organismic" perspective does have obvious affinities with a certain kind of conservative philosophies. And while Mies and Shiva nominally defend the right of abortion, they actually seem to vacillate on the issue. It would seem that they really oppose both abortion and modern contraception (including condoms) in favour of coitus interruptus. This is a very extreme position, reminiscent of certain religious groups. Curiously, there is a mostly-religious group in the United States called Feminists for Life (FFL) which explicitly opposes abortion and is neutral on contraception, no doubt in order to recruit Catholics. Unless I'm mistaken, FFL is loosely associated with a Catholic current known as Consistent Life Ethic. Apparently, the most radical supporters of this current are animal rights activists and vegetarians.

There doesn't seem to be anything in particular precluding a fusion of ecofeminism and the anti-abortion "feminists", except perhaps the traditional left-right divide.

I can't say I like it. I'm a feminist. But apparently, not an ecofeminist for life.

(Since the book is a good introduction to ecofeminism, I gave it five stars despite disagreeing with much of the contents.)
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do you call yourself a feminist? 16 Sept. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you call youself a feminist, you need to read this book! It will change the way you think about western feminists and the relationships between nature, women, and capitalism.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid information of feminism up to the early 1990's 26 July 2014
By StacyG - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book contains a slew of information on feminism up to the early 1990's. Both Mies and Shiva write collectively in the beginning, and then each write individual contributions sorted by chapter. I am a fan of Shiva, and thoroughly enjoy her writing-style. It is informative and very easy to read. She gets her point across well. As for Mies, while extremely informative, her contributions are more accusatory in tone. Her descriptive wording is a bit rough around-the-edges, which, in my opinion, makes her chapters a bit less interesting to read. She lost my attention quite a few times within the first few paragraphs of her chapters. This could also be because I'm extremely interested in the topics Shiva discusses (food security, ecological damage, their direct affectation towards women across the globe) as opposed to those Mies discusses (no war, no nukes, and some first-world womens' issues), so my lack of attention may be a result of my own bias. Regardless, both authors write well and have no difficulty providing excellent information in their chapters.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 28 Feb. 2015
By Dr.Maha - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The book is very intersting and it helped me a lot in understanging Ecofeminism
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting concepts but dry to read 2 Jan. 2013
By mcccashew - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I do not consider myself a feminist or normally reading these types of books, but ordered it because the title and summary (eco + feminism) raised my interest. The book brings interesting ideas and concepts, but was very dry to read (fine prints, heavy paragraphs and chapters, yellowish pages, no pictures or illustrations), and found towards the end that some concepts were being repeated or recycled from earlier on in the book. I preferred Shiva's chapters.
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