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Echoing Voices: More Memories of a Country House Snooper Paperback – 13 Oct 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: John Murray; New edition edition (13 Oct. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0719564921
  • ISBN-13: 978-0719564925
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 19.6 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,129,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A hilarious, honest little book about dishonesty ... John Harris's forty-six potted adventures are addictive. If the death of James Lees-Milne appeared to end a chronicle of golden nostalgia, then John Harris has taken up the baton by showing us the wicked silver realties behind it all. (Timothy Mowl, Times Literary Supplement)

The picture of a maverick which emerges from this book is ever more strongly drawn ... Harris writes nostalgically on the romance of ruins, and compellingly on the thrill of "Pevsner-bashing", the discovery of countless architectural gems, around the corner, over the hill, or behind locked gates, through a combination of insatiable curiosity, creative map-reading and a willingness to trespass. (Ruth Guilding, The Spectator)

Above all this is a gallery of exotic and strange characters form the world of antique dealing and art collecting - to be set alongside the best anthologies of grand British eccentrics. (Marcus Binney, The Times)

Praise for NO VOICE FROM THE HALL:

'Bids fair to become a cult book'

(John Carey, Sunday Times)

An intensely romantic, poignant, angry, freguently hilarious and hauntingly illustrated memoir (Hugh Massingbird)

The best non-fiction book I have read this year (Ursula Buchan, The Spectator)

Book Description

John Harris journeys further afield in the second volume of his delightful memoirs of snooping through country houses and more.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "john_sykes" on 25 Mar. 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you have an interest in the history of the Country House, this book is a good amusing read. The style is light and the stories varied although you are occasionally left wanting to know what happened next. A few of the chapters are surprisingly short and the author's choice of chapter titles will be considered by some to be rather eccentric but this doesn't detract from the overall enjoyment.
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By James Chandler on 10 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
He has written a couple and if you like old houses and a bit of ephemeral history then these are great sort of memoir stories
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chris on 21 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is the author's second brilliant and hilarious story of his personal journey around the fading post-WWII Country Estates of Britain in search of Architectural History ... With so many anecdotes along the way too, and fishing, 'antique' 'collecting' etc. Part Two of a Dole-boy 'turned good', after he had joined the 'Establishment' but still retaining his view of the real world as it was.

If you have ever been blocked by a 'Jobsworth' in your quest for British Heritage, then this book and the original 'No Voices from the Hall' are a must.

I'm in awe of the author, and he is my hero, so 'Move Over Pevsner' and 'Move Right In John Harris' - !!!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The English are different 14 May 2013
By Cupples Peet - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
John Harris is a brilliant architectural historian, but as a memoirist his life leaves a lot to be wished for. The first volume of his memoirs, Voices From an Empty Hall, was a bit dull, but, then, what did one expect from an architectural historian? Riotous dissipation and world-changing events? No. Perhaps Mr. Harris or his publishers recognized the failing because in this book he aimed for humor. Sadly, instead of humor, his anecdotes too often come off as smug and/or condescending. Harris is an intelligent man and, one suspects, a decent human being, but here he seems at pains to reveal his disdain for the artistic tastes of the natives. Some of this, I think, is the difference between English intellectuals and average Americans. If one begins with that premise and/or decides to be generous, Harris's book introduces the reader to little-known architects and houses and a time, now gone by, when English country houses were seldom visited and still broken into parts to be sold as salvage. If his humor falls flat, the view into this past is worth reading.
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