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Echoes from the Dead Zone: Across the Cyprus Divide Hardcover – 25 Apr 2005


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: I.B.Tauris (25 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 185043428X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1850434283
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 421,754 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

'Packed with historical information. It also contains moving personal testimonies from the kind of ordinary people whose voices are not usually heard above the drum beating din of history. What makes it really memorable though, is its wry humour.' - Irish Times 'He [Papadakis] can also be seen as shedding new light on old wounds - and doing his compatriots an enormous (an enormously healing) favour in the process.' - Irish Times 'Papadakis combines his excellent scholarly skills and personal background to explore the issues of identity, perceptions and narratives in Cyprus... The book is virtually free of academic terminology; stylistically, it is more like a travel book. It is humorous, moving and disturbing.' - Journal of Peace Research 'This bold book could be a cornerstone not simply in the literature, but in the resolution of the Cyprus conflict.' - Global Dialogue 'A poignant account of the ways in which collective identities surface in official and unofficial historical registers... a brave attempt to reappraise the past looking for disciples in anthropology and beyond.' - Rodanthi Tzanelli, Ethnic and Racial Studies 'Papadakis' text stands out as providing a much-needed anthropological and humanist insight into a conflict on which so much has been repeatedly and derivatively published over the years.'- Cyprus Review 'If we do not develop new ways of understanding such conflict, they may well endlessly replicate themselves. Papadakis' superb study makes this point all too clear.' - Cyprus Review Canadian Journal of Sociology Online July- August 2006 'Papadakis, has written a unique book that is a pleasure to read. It should be on the bookshelf of anyone interested in understanding the people of Cyprus and their recent unhappy history.' - Tozun Bahcheli. Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 9, No 3. 2006 'Remarkable'. -Christopher Connery and Vanita Seth. Ethnic and racial studies vol.29 No. 3 May 2006 Book Reviews 'The book is a poignant account of the ways in which collective identities surface in official and unofficial historical registers.' - Rodanthi Tzanelli. Journal of Peace Research Vol 42. 2005. 'A captivating book'. - Malte Pehl. Global Dialogue: Vol 7. 2005. ' The compelling tale of one man's voyage of discovery to 'the other side' is the superscript on the cover of this book, announcing at once its ambivalent location in the genres of both novel-writing and academic monograph, its highly reflexive approach, and its author's charming self-mocking humour.' -Olga Demetriou.

From the Publisher

-Highly topical in the context of Cyprus and the EU
-An approach on the Cyprus question never before attempted
-Beautifully and amusingly written

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Hannah on 13 Jun 2005
Format: Hardcover
Forget the usual sub soviet mumbo jumbo and codified propaganda which we have become used to from the Greek and Turkish Cypriot political elites. Papadakis talks in depth to the ordinary Cypriots about the heartache and horror to which they have been through over the last 50 years.
This book is by a Cypriot who is not afraid to question his own preconceived ideas, and those of his compatriots from both sides. Papadakis lived with the "other side" for lengthy periods and this gives the book a depth that I have never encountered before on this subject. For once we have a book which is not obsessed by big power conspiracy theories and actually shines a light on the mistakes of both communities and indirectly suggests the obvious. Compromise can really only come from Cypriots themselves. If they have the courage and political will to see the other side as human beings and not merely ciphers and caricatures which each leadership has encouraged until recently then there is still hope.
This is a fascinating read, I couldn't put it down until the last page.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AW on 5 Aug 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book is good in the sense that it offers a fairly balanced view of how Cypriots today look at the troubles that have plagued the island. What this book lacks is a description of what these troubles exactly were, why they happened and who was involved. This book does emphasize the view of moderate Cypriots, a voice seldomly heard and mostly drowned out by the extremists on both sides.

Read this book, but only after you have read some other books that explain the events that lead to Cyprus independence and the 1974 events. It will put a lot this book has to offer in context.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By annaF on 30 Aug 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a Cypriot I found this book eye-opening, written in a humane and simple language but above all it was refreshingly truthful, depicting views from both sides. I wish this book was included in schools' libraries and/or curicculum. Definetely a must read for every Cypriot and anyone interested in the Cyprus conflict!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A. H. Franks on 28 Jun 2007
Format: Hardcover
Yiannis Pappadakis has written an extraordinary book in the purest sense of the word. It is as far away from the normal regional and bi-zonal nationalistic polemics on Cyprus as a brick is from a fish. This book is brave, insightful, balanced, reflective and honest. He accurately details the tragic paradoxes with empathy and compassion: it was actually the Greek Junta which precipitated the military action of 1974 although the current President constantly emphasises the essential Hellenic nature of the island (really, is that accurate?); EOKA killed more Greek Cypriots than the British forces did; TMT killed Turkish Cypriots to blame Greek Cypriots for their death; the Turkish authorities in Cyprus tried to ensure Pappadakis saw and reported only what they wanted the Greeks to read. What a depressing cycle and circle of self-obsessed nationalism and selective view of history (which is of course written by winners -- but there are no winners here.) I had started to choose some relevant quotes to illustrate this review, but frankly there are just too many: anyone with an intelligent objective interest in the history of this most complex of islands should read this book now, in order to understand the seemingly intractable local and regional political positions. I have little doubt that some will attack this book as being overly impartial and sympathetic towards the Turkish Cypriots and Turkey -- those chapters are a tour de force of political delicacy; unlike the Bishop in Cyprus who declared that those who voted for the Annan Plan would go to hell (literally `lose Heaven' if they accepted the Annan plan (no pressure.). His analysis that Cyprus is obsessively insular is only too true. I urge readers to read the on-line Cyprus newspapers: try [...Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most books on the recent history of Cyprus tend to approach the subject from the elevated level of politics, empires, diplomacy, international plotting, government and so forth.

Here, the author takes a human view of the situation and events from the perspective of people whose lives were embroiled in or affected by the upheavals from 1960 to recent years. Many are living in what he calls the dead zone; the 'green line' established by the United Nations. One of the conventional myths exposed in the book concerns this 'green line'; it was not drawn in 1974, but eleven years previously and it is not a line, but a place where Christian and Muslim people live out uneasy lives together.

I found the book to be a very compelling read and a welcome change from the usual approach.

I learnt a few new things about Cyprus; the politics of the Coffee Shops, that the term Hadj is also used for the Christian Pilgrimage to Jerusalem, how the education system schools the pupils in hatred, that there were many refugees before 1974; in the 1960's when Turkey came close to intervening, the origin of Grivas's alter ego 'Digenis' and that Akrites are people on the border line.

I like the style of writing; honest, humorous and highly readable. There are memorable phrases; 'the language of pain', 'everyone knew someone who did not exist', 'Greeks who did not yet know they were Greek', 'the mantle of national honour'.

It is an enlightening book that brings out the importance of the human emotions of guilt, hatred and fear, in the current divisions. I would recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the island.
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