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Eat The Heat


Price: £10.63 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Amazon's Accept Store

Music

Image of album by Accept

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Image of Accept

Biography

After a few years away from the heavy metal scene, ACCEPT are ready to return to the metal forefront with renewed strength, enthusiasm and a new album that hits you with that unmistakable, classic ACCEPT sound.
„Blood Of The Nations“ offers 14 brand new songs chock-full of timeless, glorious riffs and uncompromising heavy metal power. „Blood Of The Nations“ is an ... Read more in Amazon's Accept Store

Visit Amazon's Accept Store
for 67 albums, 9 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Eat The Heat + Russian Roulette + Metal Heart / Kaizoku-Ban: Live In Japan 85'
Price For All Three: £35.06

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Product details

  • Audio CD (21 April 2014)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Hear No Evil Recordings
  • ASIN: B00INZDHR2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 174,736 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. X - T
2. GENERATION CLASH
3. CHAIN REACTION
4. LOVE SENSATION
5. TURN THE WHEEL
6. HELLHAMMER
7. PRISONER
8. I CAN'T BELIEVE IN YOU
9. MISTREATED
10. STAND 4 WHAT U R
11. BREAK THE ICE
12. D - TRAIN
13. GENERATION CLASH (Single version)

Product Description

Although they can trace their origins back to the late 60's, these German heavy metal pioneers didnt release an album until 1979's self-titled debut. Four year later they finally found a place on the international stage and major label success with 1983's controversial Balls To The Wall, which was followed up by the more radio-friendly Metal Heart in 1985. Both are available as HNE expanded editions. Originally led by the seemingly irreplaceable Udo Dirkschneider, the singer left for a solo career as UDO following 1986's Russian Roulette. Replacing Udo with the previously unknown David Reece, lead guitarist Wolf Hoffmann, bassist Peter Baltes and drummer Stefan Kaufmann produced Eat The Heat in 1989, their first LP without Udo. Now presented with a 16 page booklet featuring an in-depth essay about the album from Classic Rock and Metal Hammers Malcolm Dome, based on new interviews with the band, this remastered CD also includes the non-album 12 single remix of Generation Clash as a bonus track.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this after reading reviews following the purchase of the last couple of CD's (Blood of the Nations/Stalingrad/Blind Rage). Although I didn't expect the same style (well 25 years is a long time between releases) the difference in quality is vast. This is a poor man's hair metal band trying to ride the coat tails of the "super strat" bands that were prevalent at that time. A bit of MTV Whitesnake and other blandola balladesque type tunes, all of which fail to raise the rock flag on any track. A total departure from their UDO days as David Reece doesn't really fit in the Accept mould (proven by the fact that they changed direction back to a harder, rawer feel with an UDO soundalike). Just demonstrates how much control a record label and producer have over the musical direction of a band that had so much more quality than this. I bet Wolf Hoffman looks back on this and cringes. Do they play any of this live-very doubtful.

Give this the elbow and buy any of the latest releases that inlcude Mark Tornillo as they are far superior in musicianship, sound and composition quality.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Wow, wow, wow! I have to admit I am not a fan of the band with their usual / original singer but his album rocks! Turn the Wheel Round and X-T-C are my favourite songs. The musicianship is excellent and the guitars are wonderful. I have listened to their other albums but they aren't for me. First heard this band on the AOR magazine show on Team Rock radio when they were playing Turn the Wheel round and I thought what a fun song with great guitars and knew I had to get a copy of the album. This is a more typical 80s rock sound which I think annoyed a lot of their fans but for me this is the sort of music I like so for me the album is great.
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By pi on 30 Dec. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
perfect
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
At least 8 Great, POWERFUL TRACKS -- Excellent underrated release! 13 May 2003
By Johnny Angel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
In late 1988 Udo was "out" of Accept persuing a solo career with his new band U.D.O. (which was similar in style and musicianship to Accept) and "in" was American newcomer and powerful singer David Reece.

Udo definetly was an identifiable voice and a steadfast icon when you think of Accept, but Reece on this album showed a very clean, crisp, and downright powerful voice at times emulating such renowned metal screamers as Rob Halford or Manowar's Eric Adams. Different though, was that Reece had an image/style that was borderline "hair-metalish" which some people welcomed (he could have just as well fit into a Motley Crue or similar type of band at the time as singer), while more traditional Accept fans didn't like the new singers stlye, despite his more than adequate voice. More suprising than the fresh and welcome change in the vocal department was also a new rhythm guitarist Jim Stacey, who actually played nothing on this release but was the new touring rhythm guitar player. Not much is generally known about Jim or where he played before, or since, this era as he has pretty much disappeared from the scene. He, along with David Reece and Wolf Hoffmann were said to be very accommodating to the fans after shows during this era for the tours with WASP and Metal Church.

First and foremost, the scathing 1 or 2 star reviews here are simply from people who A. Probably never heard the album or any of the other songs beyond 'Generation Clash;, or B. Simply bash for the sake of 'bashing', or un-accepting (no pun intended) that there was a new singer. Anybody who states Reece 'could not sing' clearly needs to see an ENT specialist pronto.

The album overall I would say is' extremely good' and yes, some songs you will get a sense of commerical vibe with a dileberate intent by the Accept camp to try a new change and maybe compete with some of the other heavy rock/hair metal acts "happening" at the time, but you WILL know this is trademark Wolf Hoffmann and Peter Baltes behind their respective instruments. The first and second tracks are excellent (the 2nd track, Prisoner, you will sense the commerical sound, as if you could have envisioned it on the radio in 1989, but it still rocks really hard). I think the clear stand-out tracks by far are track 5 (D-Train) which is totally killer all-around, and track 10 (Hell Hammer) which showcases how truly powerful and crisp Reece was behind he microphone. Other tremendous tracks include Generation Clash, Chain Reaction, Break The Ice, and Turn the Wheel (which Udo and his band contributed 'crowd vocals' to).

* Note. Some albums have the additional tracks 'Break the Ice' and 'I Can't Believe In You'. Both are excellent tracks in themselves.

The 2-3 filler tracks are okay but nothing to get into a tizzy over, some of the other song titles have a "prince" vibe to them but they are still quality metal tracks. For the tracks Ive listed above, this album on those merits alone is worth a buy especially for many of those fans out there who might have really appreciated some of the better hair metal with much beefier songs than say what Poison or Faster Pussycat was doing during that time, but may have not been exposed to this release or that of David Reece.

Overall I would say this is a pretty darn good album. It's not as legendary as "Restless And Wild" or "Balls To The Wall", but it is better than even some of the stuff they released with UDO in the late 90s. However, this was the sole release with David Reece. The tour with WASP and Metal Church wasn't drawing too well and internal problems within the band led to Reece being dismissed at the beginning of the 90's and Accept going on a few years hiatus.

A few years later David Reece was rumored to have turned down an offer to join Judas Priest for the main reason of not wanting to go into another band as "a replacement singer" again -- traditional metal fans especially those who loved the "metal screamers" would more than likely I'd think appreciate Reece's work on this LP.

4 out of 5 for this album. Give it a try.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Accept carries on without Udo 26 Jan. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Despite the departure of Udo Dirkschneider and his successor, the unknown David Reece, Accept turned in a solid performance on Eat The Heat. Although this album is definitely more commercial than any of its predecessors, tracks such as "Hellhammer," "X-T-C," and "Prisoner" still have that signature Hoffmann guitarwork and Accept "bite." Yes, Accept was more than merely Udo - steadfasts Peter, Wolf, and Steffan were all present for this recording. If you call yourself an Accept fan and don't own this album yet, I suggest acquiring it while you still can. Reece's vocals are obviously different from Dirkschneider's, but while listening to it I don't confuse it with another band other than Accept. And for all you die-hard Udo fans, you can hear his vocals in the background of "Turn The Wheel Around."
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A decent Accept album, even without Udo. 11 Nov. 2005
By Christopher Fryer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album often gets knocked by Accept fans but it is actually pretty good. David Reece has a decent rock voice and most of the songs have catchy riffs and good lead guitar from the one and only Wolf Hoffman. The album kicks off with the classic de-tuned X-T-C, which was actually covered by UDO for an Accept tribute album. The next three songs, Prisoner (good melody and verse), Love Sensation (good chorus), and Chain Reaction (cool verse w/ guitar), are all good catchy songs! After that is D-train which ain't bad but not one of my favs. The next song, Generation Clash, was chosen as the video for the album. The lyrics are a bit silly but I like the bass riff and Wolf's solo is great. Turn the Wheel is probably my least favorite song on the album. The chorus just does not do it for me. The next three songs, Mistreated (decent ballad, a bit long), Stand 4 What You R (positive message), and Hellhammer (great verse and vocals), close out the album well. Eat The Heat may have been Accept's shot at more commercial success but it is not a sellout by any means. Give it a listen, you may be surprised.
Accept in the hair metal era 1 Nov. 2014
By Justin G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Man, this is one of those albums you’re almost pre-conditioned to hate. I mean, Accept without Udo – how is that even possible? Well, we eventually learned that is quite possible, but in 1989 a lot of fans viewed Accept’s sixth album with scorn. And some of that is deserved.

First off, let’s be clear that new singer David Reece did a rock solid job here. He brought a powerful voice to the band, and could do a passable Udo rasp when necessary. The fault with Eat the Heat is in the direction the band took. They, like a lot of other metal bands at the time, tried to cash in on the hair metal scene’s popularity. That meant poppier songs, bigger hair and pissed off fans of Teutonic German heavy metal.

As hair metal albums go, Eat the Heat is pretty decent. It’s no worse than the average Krokus or Quiet Riot disc, but doesn’t ever get to the glammy charm that L.A. Guns and Skid Row had. Still, if you can be objective about it, the album does have some fun songs.

It’s hard to tell whether this album or I’m a Rebel is most Accept fans’ least favorite disc. It may not be a high point in their career, but it’s still worth a listen. Fans of Reece’s later work in Bangalore Choir in particular ought to give Eat the Heat a try.

Edition Notes: Eat the Heat was reissued in 2002. It features remastered sound and two bonus tracks.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Accept 5 Nov. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I Thought It Was Great! If Your A Real Rocker & Not A Poser You'll Love This CD I Love This Band They Will Always Rock!There By Far Better Then The New Stuff Thats Out There Today......
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