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Earth [Kindle Edition]

David Brin
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)

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Book Description

It's fifty years from tomorrow, and a black hole has accidentally fallen into the Earth's core. A team of scientists frantically searches for a way to prevent the mishap from causing harm, only to discover another black hole already feeding relentlessly at the core - one that could destroy the entire planet within two years.

But some even argue that the only way to save the Earth is to let its human inhabitants become extinct: to let the million-year evolutionary clock rewind and start all over again.

From an underground lab in New Zealand to a space station in Low Earth Orbit, from an endangered species conservation ark in Africa to a home in New Orleans, EARTH is a gripping novel peopled with extraordinary characters and abundant with challenging new ideas. Above all, it is an impassioned testament about our own responsibility to our endangered planet.


Product Description

Review

Brin's popularity will grow (Brian Aldiss)

Brin writes space opera with rare panache...multi-layered, tightly plotted and excellently written (SFX)

An exhilarating read that encompasses everything from breathless action to finely drawn moments of quiet intimacy. There is no way we can avoid coming back as many times as Brin wants us to, until his story is done (LOCUS)

He weaves the alien textures exquisitely (NEW SCIENTIST)

Book Description

A powerful and fast-paced science fiction thriller.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1384 KB
  • Print Length: 625 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0356501760
  • Publisher: Orbit; New edition edition (30 Dec. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006M407GA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #123,017 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

David Brin is a scientist, public speaker and world-known author. His novels have been New York Times Bestsellers, winning multiple Hugo, Nebula and other awards. At least a dozen have been translated into more than twenty languages.

David's latest novel - Existence - is set forty years ahead, in a near future when human survival seems to teeter along not just on one tightrope, but dozens, with as many hopeful trends and breakthroughs as dangers... a world we already see ahead. Only one day an astronaut snares a small, crystalline object from space. It appears to contain a message, even visitors within. Peeling back layer after layer of motives and secrets may offer opportunities, or deadly peril.

David's non-fiction book -- The Transparent Society: Will Technology Make Us Choose Between Freedom and Privacy? -- deals with secrecy in the modern world. It won the Freedom of Speech Award from the American Library Association.

A 1998 movie, directed by Kevin Costner, was loosely based on his post-apocalyptic novel, The Postman. Brin's 1989 ecological thriller - Earth - foreshadowed global warming, cyberwarfare and near-future trends such as the World Wide Web. David's novel Kiln People has been called a book of ideas disguised as a fast-moving and fun noir detective story, set in a future when new technology enables people to physically be in more than two places at once. A hardcover graphic novel The Life Eaters explored alternate outcomes to WWII, winning nominations and high praise.

David's science fictional Uplift Universe explores a future when humans genetically engineer higher animals like dolphins to become equal members of our civilization. These include the award-winning Startide Rising, The Uplift War, Brightness Reef, Infinity's Shore and Heaven's Reach. He also recently tied up the loose ends left behind by the late Isaac Asimov: Foundation's Triumph brings to a grand finale Asimov's famed Foundation Universe.

Brin serves on advisory committees dealing with subjects as diverse as national defense and homeland security, astronomy and space exploration, SETI and nanotechnology, future/prediction and philanthropy.

As a public speaker, Brin shares unique insights -- serious and humorous -- about ways that changing technology may affect our future lives. He appears frequently on TV, including several episodes of "The Universe" and History Channel's "Life After People." He also was a regular cast member on "The ArciTECHS."

Brin's scientific work covers an eclectic range of topics, from astronautics, astronomy, and optics to alternative dispute resolution and the role of neoteny in human evolution. His Ph.D in Physics from UCSD - the University of California at San Diego (the lab of nobelist Hannes Alfven) - followed a masters in optics and an undergraduate degree in astrophysics from Caltech. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Space Institute. His technical patents directly confront some of the faults of old-fashioned screen-based interaction, aiming to improve the way human beings converse online.

Website: http://www.davidbrin.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/davidbrin1

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite an epic... 19 Jan. 1998
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I was really fascinated by this book, even if it was a tad long. I find the idea of writing near-future sci-fi to be one of the most challenging types of stories, especially when the political climate can change as dramatically as it has since Earth was written: I get bogged down in the what-ifs of it all. Anyway, I'm impressed with the "prediction" factor, as it seems Mr. Brin has balanced interest with plausability all with skill. I wonder if the the larger alien intervention idea wasn't influenced by a similar one in Sagan's Contact.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Many a man has traced his fingers in the smooth sands of the future, foretelling stories of glory or grisly reality. Few (none I have read) have held up to time's test for accuracy and foresight like Mr Brin's work in Earth. Written over 7 years ago, I (yesterday) finished the experience and turned on the television, checked my email, and, like a whispering fortuneteller, the television news described the probable mental effects of today's solar flares, the flooding in the great plains, greenhouse gases, and Greenpeace activists misguided efforts to save the arctic wastelands and getting frozen in the act, so to speak.

I gave this book to my girlfriend, with encouragement to keep a dictionary close by and "just get through the first fifty pages". The purpose was to create considerable fodder for discussion for many eves to come. It seems to me this rigorous and scientific work has a wisdom and coherence that can be appreciated only by those willing to put down all preconceptions about human limits, and capable of ingesting the depths and implications of modern science. I am convinced two years of university schooling could be substituted for a thorough study of just this book.
Multifaceted, multilevel, and, best of all, multi- perspective. I admit some of the detail could have been left out to avoid losing the interest of the scientifically literate, and simplifying the daunting task of the reader whose mind has yet to consider the implications of who and what we are, and what the future holds for humanity.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
David Brin has managed to extrapolate in ways that no other SF author has done. He not only advances technology by half a century, but also the trends of society. His idea that senior citizens will basically control the world because they are the largest voting group sounded right on. Maybe the most impressive thing about Brin's writing is the way he takes multiple plot lines and plays them on each other, having them all come together at the end. My only problem is that the characters didn't seem as well rounded as the ones in his other novels.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'll read more Brin!! 7 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I hadn't read anyhthing by Brin before, when I saw EARTH at the library, I judged it by its cover. It turned out to be a great story with well developed, thoughtful characters. The end was not too "out there" (just barely) but he made it sound plausible. I was very happy he didn't end it on some cliche ominous note. I liked his vision of our future. I'll enjoy being a little old man there. My only wish was that, in a book this long, he had included a list of characters to refer back to.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The train to Morrow is a mile upon its way... 30 Sept. 1998
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Two very difficult tasks are managing a large cast of important characters and building a near-future society. David Brin does both brilliantly in Earth. The people are engaging and believable, even when their parts are tangental, and the society is phenomenal. He correctly anticipates many aspects of the WWW, and I'm eagerly watching as many more predictions move towards fulfillment. His ecological predictions are realistic, not catastrophic, and his solution, though a bit over the top, leavens the divine intervention with the practical steps we still need to take. Not only is this a first class work of science fiction, it's a insightful work of sociology, technology forecasting, and people watching.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
In Earth, David Brin has managed to place me in a juxtaposition, as a reader. In half of the near-future portrayed in Earth, life is dismal, and the characters are resigned each to a diminished existence amidst a humanity submissive to Gaia. On the other hand, there happen to be situations and characters that drew me in, that I wanted to be part of. This book seems to be Brin's answer to Gore's Earth in the Balance. All of our worst nightmares about humankind's destruction of the planet have come true, and it is this grim outlook that hangs like smog over an excellent science fiction tale that seems like slim pickings during the reading, but shines in retrospect.

In desirable morsels between the dreary passages, Brin explores the possibility of a black hole being accidentally released on the surface of the Earth. Initially, it is a microscopic "singularity", and slips through the crust to eventually orbit our planet's core. Theoretically, it would consume the Earth's mantle for years until this 3rd rock from the sun implodes--over 80% of the Earth's mass being consumed in the final few minutes. Of course, David Brin is too brilliant for it to be left so simple a problem, which is why Earth is as intriguing a mystery as it is science fiction.

In typical Brin style, all the stops are pulled out for the climax. That includes the wildly unexpected. Regular readers of Brin won't be surprised at the feeling that they've stepped into a completely different tale when the lengthy, exciting climax erupts.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok but neither as prophetic or punchy as promised
Found this pretty hard work to keep my interest going. Looking back and reading the afterword it clicked. David refers to a huge amount of influences and ideas from other sources. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Simon R. Williams
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
item as described Speedy delivery
Published 3 months ago by ms beverley northfield
3.0 out of 5 stars Duffer.
This story is a bit disappointing if you are looking out for some more Brin fiction. I won't say buy it,sorry but not up to standard.
Published 8 months ago by James 42
5.0 out of 5 stars thoughtful and profound.
An educational insightful novel. I couldn't put it down and can't stop thinking about it. Brin has done enormous research and it hits home.
Published 12 months ago by Michelle Phelan
5.0 out of 5 stars Part novel, part documentary
This is a fantastic glimpse into the future. The predictions of what could happen in the event of any global catatrosphe, regardless of how feasible it is, are chilling. Read more
Published 13 months ago by Andrew Lambert
4.0 out of 5 stars Earth
First 4/5 are really imaginative and exciting; I think the "climax" gets a little too far fetched for believable, grounded SciFi. Read more
Published 22 months ago by Paul Harrison
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good
Very good novel and very up to date. Definitely recommend it to all of you who like realistic science fiction.
Published 22 months ago by Pedro Nunes
2.0 out of 5 stars Depressing and lacks feeling. Not his usual standard...
Beware that this book is nothing like the awesome uplift series. Its dry and depressing. I would recommend skipping this particular book. Read more
Published on 14 Oct. 2012 by John
5.0 out of 5 stars A superb story, prescient of so many technological developments
A superb story, prescient of so many technological developments, I have read and re-read this book several times over the past 18 years. Read more
Published on 28 Jun. 2012 by Not My Real Name
2.0 out of 5 stars Spoilt by awful editing on Kindle version (iPad)
This book has a great theme and the potential to be a riveting read - for which I would like to give 4 stars, but have to cut that in half because of very poor editorial input. Read more
Published on 13 Mar. 2012 by A. Parekh
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