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Early Visual Development, Normal and Abnormal [Hardcover]

Kurt Simons


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Book Description

3 Feb 1994 0195077210 978-0195077216
Since the 1960s, there has been great expansion of our understanding of the development of vision in early life. New techniques and technologies have provided unprecedented insights into the function of all the components of the visual system - optical, motor and neural - during this formative period. These insights have come from neurophysiological studies of animal models, electrophysiological and psychophysical studies of infants and young children, and clinical and other studies of such abnormal developmental conditions as amblyopia ("lazy eye"), nystagmus and prematurity. Despite this broadened scope of study of early visual development, there has never been a comprehensive single text or reference work definitively reviewing the entire field. This important work provides such an overview. Equally useful to the student or clinician looking for a convenient introduction to the field and to the researcher in seeking explicit detail, this book provides a new degree of integration of this diverse field.

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not a rating - further information on this title and contributors 15 Sep 2006
By Jevons & Hollerith Books - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This volume is the product of a Symposium on Infant Vision Research held March 7-9, 1991. Kurt Simons organized the symposium under the sponsorship of the Committee on Vision, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education of the (U.S.) National Research Council and edited the results for publication. Susan McKee, in the foreword to this volume, explains the origins of the symposium and this proceedings; she chaired the Committee on Vision in 1991.

TABLE OF CONTENTS¹:

PART I: Refractive Development

1. Early Refractive Development, H.C. Howland

2. Visually Guided Control of Refractive State: Results from Animal Models, F. Schaeffel

3. Infant Accommodation and Convergence, R.N. Aslin

PART II: Oculomotor Function

4. Conjugate Eye Movements of Infants, L. Hainline

5. The Development of the Vestibuloocular and Optokinetic Reflexes, K.L. Preston and D.V. Finocchio

PART III: Spatial and Chromatic Vision

6. Front-End Limitations to Infant Spatial Vision: An Examination of Two Analyses, M.S. Banks and J.A. Crowell

7. Development of the Human Visual Field, D.L. Mayer and A.B. Fulton

8. Development of Scotopic Retinal Sensitivity, R.M. Hansen and A.B. Fulton

9. Infant Color Vision: OKN Techniques and Null Plane Analysis, D.Y. Teller and D.T. Lindsey

10. Orientation- and Motor-Selective Mechanisms in Infants, O. Braddick

11. Intrinsic Noise and Infant Visual Performance, A.M. Brown

PART IV: Biocular Vision

12. Development of Interocular Vision in Infants, S. Shimojo

13. Steropsis in Infants and its Developmental Relationship to Visual Acuity, E.E. Birch

14. Sensory-Motor Adaptation and the Development of the Horopter, C.M. Schor

15. Two Stages in the Development of Binocular Vision and Eye Alignment, R. Held

16. On the Development of the Threshold Nonlinearity, Peripheral Acuity, Binocularity and Complex Steroscopic Processing, C.W. Tyler

PART V: Retinal and Cortical Development

17. Morphological Development of the Primate Retina, A.E. Hendrickson

18. Biological Limits on Visual Development in Primates, J.A. Movshon and L. Kiorpes

PART VI: Abnormal Visual Development

19. Clinical Examination of Infant Visual Status, A. B. Fulton et al.

20. Visual Acuity Testing in Infants: From the Laboratory to the Clinic, V. Dobson

21. Infant Vision Screening: Prediction and Prevention of Strabismus and Amblyopia from Refractive Screening in the Cambridge Photorefraction Program, J. Atkinson

22. Detection and Treatment of Congenital Esotropia, S.M. Archer

23. Motion Sensitivity and the Origins of Infantile Strabismus, L. Tychsen

24. Amblyopia: A Consequence of Abnormal Visual Development, D.M. Levi and A. Carkeet

25. Stereoscopic Neurontropy and the Origins of Amblyopia and Stabismus, K. Simons

26. Visual Outcomes After Infant Cataract, D. Maurer and T.L. Lewis

27. Prematurity and Visual Development, A.R. Fielder et al.

28. Visual Factors in Development Delay and Neurological Disorders in Infants, C.S. Hoyt and W.V. Good

PART VII: What Next in Infant Research?

29. Use of Models to Improve Hypothesis Delineation: A Study of Infant Electroretinography, D.C. Hood et al.

30. Improving Infant Evoked Response Measurement, A.M. Norcia

31. Whither Infant Psychophysics?, I. Abromov

32. Theories of Infant Visual Development, H.R. Wilson

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS:

Israel Abramov, Infant Study Center, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Steven M. Archer, W.K. Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan

Richard N. Aslin, Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester

Janette Atkinson, Visual Development Unit, University of Cambridge, U.K.

Martin S. Banks, School of Optometry and Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley

Eileen E. Birch, Retina Foundation of the Southwest, Dallas, Texas and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwest Medical Center

Oliver Braddick, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, U.K.

Andrew M. Brown, College of Optometry, Ohio State

Andrew Carkeet, College of Optometry, University of Houston

James A. Crowell, School of Optometry and Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley

Velma Dobson, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh

Alistair R. Fielder, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham Medical School, U.K.

Dom V. Finocchio, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Nigel Foreman, Department of Psychology, University of Leicester, U.K.

Anne B. Fulton, Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School

William V. Good, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco

Mark J. Greenwald, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago

Louise Hainline, Infant Study Center, Brooklyn College, City University of New York

Ronald M. Hansen, Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School

Richard Held, Infant Vision Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Anita E. Hendrickson, Departments of Biological Structure and Ophthalmology, University of Washington

Donald C. Hood, Department of Psychology, Columbia University

Howard C. Howland, Section of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University

Creig S. Hoyt, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco

Lynne Kiorpes, Center for Neural Science and Department of Psychology, New York University

Dennis M. Levi, College of Optometry, University of Houston

Terri L. Lewis, McMaster University and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto

Delwin T. Lindsey, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Daphne Maurer, McMaster University and The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto

D. Luisa Mayer, Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston

Merrick J. Moseley, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham Medical School, U.K.

J. Anthony Movshon, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, New York University

Anthony M. Norcia, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco

Karen L. Preston, Department of Psychology, University of Washington

Judith Robinson, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Birmingham Medical School, U.K

Dorothy W. Rodier, Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School

Frank Schaeffel, Department of Experimental Ophthalmology, University Eye Hospital, Tübingen, Germany

Clifton M. Schor, School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley

Shinsuke Shimojo, Department of Psychology, University of Tokyo

Kurt Simons, The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Michael P. Stryker, Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco

Davida Y. Teller, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington

Lawrence Tychsen, Departments of Ophthalmology, Anatomy, and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis

Christopher W. Tyler, Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco

Hugh R. Wilson, Visual Sciences Center, University of Chicago

¹ The table of contents material in the "Editorial Reviews" section of this listing was added _after_ this review was published.
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