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Dying to Live: Life Sentence Paperback – 15 Oct 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Permuted Press (15 Oct. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934861111
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934861110
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,161,352 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
With Dying to Live, Kim Paffenroth set a new standard for zombie fiction; with Life Sentence he has moved the goal posts again and given us another fresh approach to the genre. Set 12 years after the original and told through the eyes of two characters that were but baby and child when the original horror unfolded...oh, and there's the point of view from the zombies' side of the fence - but more on that in a minute. Our heroes and heroines from the first book are present, but they take a back seat to the next generation in this novel. With most of the zombies herded up and safely behind fences the community has grown and moved beyond the walls of the museum and started to build something of a life for themselves. Much of the story follows community life through the eyes of twelve year old Zoey who has only ever known life as it is now and struggles to understand what came before: were people then worse than the zombies now?

As for the zombies, well a couple of them have retained some memory and motor skills that are not normally associated with the un-dead. Normally, I am not a fan of this approach and was somewhat apprehensive when I started the first chapter featuring Trueman, a zombie that can think and communicate with the humans. But as his character developed I became very fond of him and pitied his situation as he tried to make sense of what he has become; he knows that he is different but quite make out how or why. Shame on me for doubting Paffenroth for even a minute!

In truth, compared to the first book, not a great deal happens in Life Sentence but it is still an engrossing read. It's a bit like dropping in on some old friends to catch up on all the gossip. This is not so much about the zombies themselves but more the world the affliction has left behind and how our survivors have evolved.
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Format: Paperback
This is a sequel to 'Dying to Live' but can be read in isolation without losing too much as it is set 12 years later. However, I recommend you start with the first book as some of the characters feature here too.

The settlement in the museum has grown since the first book and Zoey (the baby) has now reached an age where she is expected to undergo a ceremony to become an adult. A significant proportion of the book features her story, and her view of a world where zombies are considered normal. The adults that remember the world before refer to concepts that she can't understand.

Meanwhile Milton is still rounding up zombies rather than exterminating them. The other major part of the story features a zombie who has retained the ability to think and some of his old skills, like typing. This is a bit of a change from the first book, but is handled well and I was pleasantly surprised as I'm a bit of a purist and I hate it when authors introduce gimmicky zombies.

I can't say much more without giving spoilers, but this is a solid sequel and much better written than most zombie stories.
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By Stijn Anthoni on 5 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
I like the "standard" zombiebooks where something goes horribly wrong and the books starts with people in all sorts of situations trying to stay alive. Which is also what this book is about, but it tries way too hard (at the start) to walk a more "intelligent" path and ends up being just thesame. The book switches every chapter between the people inside the camp (read the first book first if you don't know what I mean) and a situation where some zombies are being followed that actually have the capacity to think and interact. I've mostly skipped the "camp" parts because they were so "reminiscing" and just read the interesting (in my opinion) chapters of the zombies that could think. How peculiar that might sound, zombies that can think and have faint memories of the life they led, it is really well written. Halfway through the book it starts to get really good in both chapters and it ends up to be almost as good as the first book.
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By Nathangreening on 18 July 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very good zombie book, not as good as the first but still very good. Hardly got any sleep due to picking the book up after work and not being able to put it down
Must read for any zombie fan
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By I. Dalziel on 6 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback
Ive read loads of zombie books some fantastic others really good,but this one was torture to read I had to force myself to finish it.
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