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Dustbin Baby Paperback – 1 Oct 2002

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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi Childrens; New edition edition (1 Oct. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552547964
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552547963
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 1 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (166 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 999,582 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jacqueline Wilson is an extremely well-known and hugely popular author. The Illustrated Mum was chosen as British Children's Book of the Year in 1999 and was winner of the Guardian Children's Fiction Award 2000. Jacqueline has won the prestigious Smarties Prize and the Children's Book Award for Double Act, which was also highly commended for the Carnegie Medal. In June 2002 Jacqueline was given an OBE for services to literacy in schools and in 2008 she was made a Dame.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Tessa Peake Jones reads Jacqueline Wilson's Dustbin Baby in this unabridged double-cassette audio book. Jacqueline Wilson is the diva of dynamic writing for children, and in Dustbin Baby--possibly her best book since The Illustrated Mum--she proves yet again that she is a force to be reckoned with.

April Showers (so called because of her birth date, April 1, and her tendency to burst into tears at the drop of a hat) was unceremoniously dumped in a rubbish bin when she was only a few hours old. Her young life has passed by in a blur of ever-changing foster homes but as she enters her teens she decides it is time to find out the truth about her real family.

As ever, Wilson breaks through the barriers and brings one of her trademark feisty females to life in an original, unforgettable and often very funny story that is sure to make you weep. She tackles the big emotional issues with one foot firmly on the ground, allowing her characters to thrive against a backdrop of sadness. But she never lapses into melodrama or schmaltz and ultimately showers the reader with an overwhelming feeling of hope.

The story is suitable for ages nine and above and running time is three hours and 15 minutes. --Susan Harrison

Review

" Hugely popular with seven to ten year olds: she should be prescribed for all cases of reading reluctance." -- "Independent on Sunday"

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Claire Hennessy on 1 Dec. 2001
Format: Hardcover
I'm nearly 16 and I still can't bring myself to pass by a Jacqueline Wilson book, so the second I saw Dustin Baby I bought it.
On the day of her 14th birthday, April relates the story of her life in and out of various foster homes to the reader while on a search for her real mother, the one who abandoned her in a dustbin. It's a powerful and moving story. April never asks for sympathy or feels sorry for herself, yet she's not noble and determined either. What she is, is a child dealing with the situations she finds herself in realistically and in a way that readers will be able to identify with. The ending is moving - well, I was crying, anyway! - but yet not overly sentimental or cliched.
Parents, buy a copy for your child. And then another for yourself. ;)
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Tester(RebeccaTlvswho@hotmail.com on 5 May 2002
Format: Hardcover
April was dumped in a dustbin as a baby,her birthday is April the 1st so on that day she decides to visit some of the people she remebers from her past. Its very emotional as soon as I saw it in the shops it was an oppourtunity I could'nt miss. She also tries to tract down her mother whom she hasn't sean in 14 years. She finds out the family shes got at the moment is perfect!!!!!!!Its is a good read for girls over the age of 11!!!!!!!
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Oct. 2001
Format: Hardcover
The story is about 15 year old April, who was dumped in a dustbin by her mother when she was born. She takes a day off school to try and find her biological mother, ands also all the foster mothers she has been placed with since she was born.
She has no luck, but along the way she finds Frankie, the man who found her in the dustbin. She makes a new friend, and meets an old one along the way.
I have read all Jacqueline Wilson's books and this rates among the best. I couldn't put it down and read it in two days. I would recommend it to any J.W. fans out there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ollapod on 23 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
'Dustbin Baby' is such a good but sad, touching and stressing story.

It is about a girl called April who was found, when she was just born, in a dustbin. She grew up, switching between loads of different homes, whether they were foster/care homes or actual foster parents' homes. She never had a proper home, apart from when she had a foster Mum and a foster Dad. They all got on, but then one day the Dad was shouting at the Mum. He packed his bags, and then left home. The mum was ever so distraught and stressed. All she did all day was cry and cry, but then one day she went in the bathroom, and locked the door. She was in there for hours and hours, leaving the 3 year-old-foster daughter (April) in the house, desperate for the toliet (the bathroom that the foster mum was in was the only bathroom). So April went round to the next door neighbours and used their toliet. The next door neighbours finally went round to April's home and climbed up a ladder and looked through the bathroom window to see why the mum was taking so long. (This is when I cried.). The mum had killed herself.

It is very upsetting, the bit that I have just told you. But do buy this book; it is fascinating, but do not get it if you don't like sad stories!
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Mrs S Carter on 22 Oct. 2001
Format: Hardcover
I got this book for my birthday and it was one of the best present I recieved. It is about a girl who was dumped in a dustbin when she was only a few hours old. The book starts with April's birthday and she feels sad because that day 14 years ago she was dumped in a dustbin. She decides to go on a quest to find her real mother. She starts by bunking off school and tries to find all the other carers who fostered her. She then decides to go to the place she was dumped and oddly there is a message for her saying 'Please call baby' with a phone number. When she rings it she finds it is the person who found her 14 years ago. When April rings the number she finds the person is a man named Freddy and they arrange to meet.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Squirrel on 18 May 2012
Format: Paperback
My daugher is 8 years old - here is her review....I thought that this book was quite grown up. I really liked it because it was kind of like a Tracey Beaker story - fun, mysterious and difficult problems.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Pickerel on 13 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
Jacqueline Wilson is undoubtedly a skilled wordsmith; a lovely fluid style, sophisticated yet accessible, making for a rewarding reading experience.

BUT...

The enduring popularity of gritty misery in popular culture and the ubiquity of the `if-it-bleeds-it-leads' media demonstrates an appetite in society for sadness, dysfunction and tragedy as entertainment. Here, Wilson serves this up in huge spades for your young daughter.

The baby April is abandoned, the father takes to drink, there are rows and father walks out, the mother kills herself (slits her wrists), April is ruthlessly bullied, she's accused of attempting to murder her bully... there's more... themes of self-loathing, jealousy, hate, emotional blackmail... do you want me to carry on? The plot itself is thin and the hurried `positive note' ending is only a transparent justification for all the previous morbid indulgences.

The argument that your child benefits from immersion in the extremes of social dysfunction and tragedy, while at the immature age at which this book is aimed, is deeply disingenuous on several levels; whose needs are really being satisfied here?

Unfortunately I suspect that parents, normalised to indulging in tragedy through their own tv and media exposure may find this book acceptable. I suspect that most young readers won't even get close to understanding the emotional weight of the subject matter; serving them up something they can't compehend, outwardly on their own level as a childrens' book, is unfair.

I also consider that a large part of my parental responsibility is to induct my children into making sense of their own realities, their lives; 150 pages of unrelenting sadness, dysfunction and misery is unhelpful in this respect.

I advise against buying this book.
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