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Dubliners Paperback – 31 Aug 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 134 pages
  • Publisher: Lits (31 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1609420500
  • ISBN-13: 978-1609420505
  • Product Dimensions: 18.9 x 24.6 x 0.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 831,121 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The eldest of ten children, James Joyce was born in Dublin on the 2nd of February 1882. Despite his family being impoverished by his father's failings as a business man, Joyce was educated at the best Jesuit schools and later in 1898 at University College Dublin. His first published work was a review on Ibsen's play When We Awaken in the Fortnightly Review in 1900. Upon graduating, Joyce moved to Paris in pursuit of a medical career. Before long, he gave up attending lectures and devoted himself to literature. He returned to Dublin as a result of the fatal illness of his mother and shortly afterwards, in 1904, Joyce met Nora Barnacle who was later to become his wife. The young couple travelled to the continent and in 1905 settled in Trieste where they were to remain until 1915. Joyce's first book Chamber Music was published in 1907 as a book of poetry and Dubliners followed in 1914.

The Joyces had two children; Giorgio, born 1905 and Lucia in 1907. Lucia was to develop a disturbing mental illness which greatly affected the family and would remain a prominent factor for the rest of Jocye's life. During the First World War Joyce moved to Zurich where he remained until 1919 when he moved to Paris to work on what is widely understood as his greatest and most prodigious work, Ulysses. After being worked on for eight years, Ulysses was published in Paris in 1922 on Joyces Birthday. It could be true to say that in Ulysses, Joyce attempts to 'know' everything and to add to this 'knowledge' by creating his own language. Joyce's highly experimental and revolutionary work positioned him firmly as one of the key figures of modernism.

As spoken to Georges Borach, one of Joyce's students in Zurich, Joyce comments that 'there are indeed hardly more than a dozen themes in world literature. Then there is an enormous number of combinations of these themes.' He goes on to denounce all the thinkers of the last 200 years and to position Aristotle as the 'greatest thinker of all time.' Such statements are testimony to Joyce's determination in his quest for knowledge, to know what knowledge was and to challenge it. Joyce greatly admired authors such as Dante, D'Annunzio and Ibsen.

Joyce was greatly admired by many authors including Italo Svevo, author of Zeno's Conscience who he met in Trieste and, Samuel Beckett who he met in Paris.


Product Description

Review

* A remarkable collection...this is one to savour and revisit. The Observer * ...skill, subtlety, diversity and sheer brilliance...Season the mix with the voice of one of the greatest Irish actors ever, and you're talking about a true classic. Sue Arnold, The Guardian --The Guardian --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Book Description

A wonderrful portrait of the city of Dublin. Joyce's first important work, in this he introduced the city to the world for the first time. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Peter Piper TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am delighted to have found such a beautifully produced complete collection enabling me to simply listen and soak up the atmosphere of James Joyce's early twentieth century Dublin.

Hearing the stories read seems to me to be the perfect way to revisit or discover them for the first time. Each story in this CD box set is introduced by a period song transferred from a 78 rpm record, setting the scene for the faultless readings by Jim Norton to make a completely captivating whole.

The stories vary considerably, from the simply melancholic to, for example, 'Counterparts' which chillingly depicts drunkenness, menace and violence. They have all the resonance of a sad song telling of a love lost, a missed opportunity, the 'if only' or 'what might have been'.

This set contains two triple CD cases. Inside Part One there is a 12 page booklet which includes a useful description of the context of the stories and the struggle Joyce had to get them published. The Part Two booklet contains additional notes by Roger Marsh. Each booklet also contains several photographs of Dublin past, and the details of each track and timings.

Dubliners Part 1 CD contains: The Sisters, An Encounter, Araby, Eveline, After the Race, Two Gallants, The Boarding House, A Little Cloud, Counterparts and Clay.

Dubliners Part 2 CD contains: A Painful Case, Ivy Day in the Committee Room, A Mother, Grace, and The Dead.

Worth every penny, many times over!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By William D. Freeman on 6 Aug. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Dubliners is the usual route into the fiction of James Joyce as it is considered the most "accessible" to readers. I have read the book and agree with that view, but having listened now to these wonderful recordings by Jim Norton I would also say that just listening to this set will do for anyone new to Joyce just as well as reading the book.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Joel Bateman on 12 Dec. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Nobody else has reviewed this, so I thought I'd chip in. I've read 'Dubliners' a couple of times, although not for a few years now. But I've started listening to audiobooks when I travel, and I thought this one might be an interesting listen. The stories are excellent, and if you've not read 'Dubliners' before, you probably should. Most of them convey minor incidents in the lives of minor people, but they do so in a remarkable way. For all of Joyce's later invention & imagination, he also demonstrates here (and elsewhere, for that matter) an incredible insight into the ordinary lives of unexceptional people, and several of these stories are heartbreaking. (Some are also quite funny.)

Anyway, onto the Naxos audiobook. This six-disc set contains the all the stories, over about seven hours. The reader is Jim Norton, best known to me as Bishop Len Brennan from 'Father Ted'. I initially wondered if that was going to be a distraction, but (thankfully) it turns out that his normal reading voice is nothing like that character's distinct style. Norton does the range of characters very well, even in stories like 'Ivy Day in the Committee Room', where I never had any problems telling the multiple characters apart during lenghty dialogues. He even sings a few times! Naxos has also used some suitable music to top & tail most of the stories here, which adds suitably to the atmosphere.

Anyway, whether you've enjoyed 'Dubliners' before, or are trying to start on Joyce with his most accessible work, I can highly recommend this version. I've now bought the Naxos version of 'Finnegans Wake', in the hope that an (abridged) audio reading of that book will make it even faintly comprehensible...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lily Lit on 31 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback
The most famous of the short stories in this collection is of course The Dead. A beautiful and tragic story of lost love and memories.

Yet each story holds its own in fitting in the author's main theme of paralysis, how things were standing still particularly in Ireland. How the lives of the characters remain the same whilst the world moves around them and his need to escape Ireland - Joyce very much feeling a stranger in his own land at the time of writing.

Now onto the edition. Strange to say but the font is what grabs me most about this edition. I have used Norton Critical Editions in studying Jane Eyre and the essays provided both at the back of this and Jane Eyre were informative, and excellent for the student of english literature in that it provided an excellent context and critical commentary up to and including third level study.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bob Studholme on 29 Jun. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A well written collection of short stories by one of the english speaking people's most revered authors. This is no light reading. All the stories reveal characters whose lives are in some kind of paralysis and who become aware of this themselves by some happening in their story.
Joyce shows the city of Dublin and it's cultural existence as being similarly paralysed whilst he frequently intimates that England has a much more thriving society.
It is a gritty social account of a somewhat isolated city and it's inhabitants. It is not a light read, but it is well written and shows the human observations of the man who went on to write some of the finest works in Irish literature. Not necessarily a work to be enjoyed but certainly an aspect of the human condition to be studied.
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