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Droppin' Science: Critical Essays on Rap Music and Hip Hop Culture (Critical Perspectives on the Past Series) [Paperback]

William Eric Perkins
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: 19.99
Price: 17.77 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

1 Oct 1995 Critical Perspectives on the Past Series
Rap and hip hop, the music and culture rooted in African American urban life, bloomed in the late 1970s on the streets and in the playgrounds of New York City. This critical collection serves as a historical guide to rap and hip hop from its beginnings to the evolution of its many forms and frequent controversies, including violence and misogyny. These wide-ranging essays discuss white crossover, women in rap, gangsta rap, message rap, raunch rap, Latino rap, black nationalism, and other elements of rap and hip hop culture like dance and fashion. An extensive bibliography and pictorial profiles by Ernie Pannicolli enhance this collection that brings together the foremost experts on the pop culture explosion of rap and hip hop. Author note: William Eric Perkins is a Faculty Fellow at the W.E.B. DuBois House at the University of Pennsylvania, and an Adjunct Professor of Communications at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Frequently Bought Together

Droppin' Science: Critical Essays on Rap Music and Hip Hop Culture (Critical Perspectives on the Past Series) + Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America (Music & Culture) + Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation
Price For All Three: 42.13

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Temple University Press,U.S.; First Edition edition (1 Oct 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566393620
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566393621
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 16.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 361,307 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"It is the undisputed word, the perfect blend of truth with reality, the flyest and realest reading about the flyest and realest art. These essays are informational, readable, and necessary to correct the misunderstanding that sweeps the news." --Ishmael Butler (aka Butterfly), Grammy Award-winning artist, Digable Planets

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading. 3 Feb 2008
Format:Paperback
This is a collection of articles about Hip hop. Many are researched in depth, and refreshingly opinionated. There is one in particular about the origins of Breakdancing that is awesome, and strongly argues that Capoeira was not a contributor to Breaking. The book is well written and a must read for all Hip Hop fans.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rather good book 4 Aug 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Very interesting, with opinions that don't always duplicate what the last person said. I really enjoyed some of the essays of this book. It challenges white patriarchal assumptions about Black music, its relevance, and those who are trying to appropriate it for their own financial gain. Tricia Rose's book is also a good one.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A plethora of intellectual and dynamic thoughts on hip hop. 2 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Droppin science is a collection of insightful essays from a variety of intellectuals about the social dynamics and history behind the music now known as hip-hop. Every hip-hop head or any music lover in general could benefit from this insightful collection. From the influences of the island cultures on rap to the history of dance, this book illuminates and expands the present discourse on rap. This is a book I will surely pass onto others in the hip-hop community.
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rather good book 4 Aug 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Very interesting, with opinions that don't always duplicate what the last person said. I really enjoyed some of the essays of this book. It challenges white patriarchal assumptions about Black music, its relevance, and those who are trying to appropriate it for their own financial gain. Tricia Rose's book is also a good one.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good essay collection 28 Sep 2006
By British Commentator - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I would recommend this to any Hip Hop fan as a book to read. It has a collection of essays on various aspects of Hip Hop. Some are quite amazing; a standout was one that researched the origins of Breaking and traced different moves to different parts of Africa. It is a very good book; people who read works by Nelson George or James Spady, or who are familiar with David Toop's "Rapattack", Jim Fricke's "Yes Yes Y'all" or Jeff Chang's "Can't Stop Won't Stop" will like this.
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome! 5 Feb 2011
By stonevm - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
What a gem! For anyone interested in hip hop and cultural studies, this is a must read. In addition, the service and delivery was great!
5.0 out of 5 stars A SELECTION OF ESSAYS COVERING A WIDE AREA 15 Dec 2010
By Steven H. Propp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
At the time this 1996 book was published, editor William Eric Perkins was a Faculty Fellow at the W.E.B. Du Bois College House at the University of Pennsylvania, and an Adjunct Professor of Communications at Hunter College.

He writes in the Preface book, "No one has analyzed the complex interior of hip-hop culture, surveyed its many genres and personalities, examined its effect on the large white market, or acknowledged hip hop internationalization. The essayists in this book address those deficiencies and together put rap and hip hop culture into a wider framework of media and culture. They discuss the ongoing controversies about rap music within the context of contemporary debates about racial, class, and gender politics. With an acute historical vision, the contributors look at and beyond the rapidly changing trends in popular music. Their essays examine rap's significance to its makers and consumers as well as its cultural implications beyond music. Who makes this music and why? What does the making of this form of cultural expression mean in this time and place?"

Here are some quotations from the book:

"This (digital) technological breakthrough allowed DJs to exploit an infinite number of samples from vinyl, advertising jingles, television sitcom themes, and movie sound tracks. It is sampling and mixing that gives rap music its self-renewing character." (Pg. 8)
"More often than not, 'G-boys' are simply out to get paid, making funky jeep music, practicing the ancient art of playing the dozens, trying to be funny, and giving the people what they want. And when they address the problems of inner-city communities, we have to keep in mind that their sharpest critiques of capitalist America are derived from the same social and economic contexts that led a lot of homies to distrust black women and each other." (Pg. 147-148)
"The Beastie Boys' album Licensed to Ill offers a set of songs that, heard today, sound less like rap than like a postmodern potpourri of styles from blues-metal to sampled sounds, all borrowed, of course, from Black sources. It is inauthentic as rap because the appropriations lack the effrontery that inspired the first rap artists." (Pg. 189)
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