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Drive 2011

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A Hollywood stunt performer who moonlights as a wheelman discovers that a contract has been put on him after a heist gone wrong.

Starring:
Carey Mulligan, Ron Perlman
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 40 minutes
Starring Carey Mulligan, Ron Perlman, Bryan Cranston, Albert Brooks, Ryan Gosling, Christina Hendricks, Oscar Isaac
Director Nicolas Winding Refn
Genres Drama, Thriller
Studio ICON HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 30 January 2012
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 40 minutes
Starring Carey Mulligan, Ron Perlman, Bryan Cranston, Albert Brooks, Ryan Gosling, Christina Hendricks, Oscar Isaac
Director Nicolas Winding Refn
Genres Drama, Thriller
Studio ICON HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 30 January 2012
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
This is one of the most impressive movies I have ever seen and I will explain why. The cinematography in this movie is flawless with beautiful long lasting shots that really add to the dark vibe running through the movie and car sequences filmed better than any other movie I have seen. The story is also a huge plus in this movie and despite the movie being a decent length it does a great job at introducing the main characters and through fantastic screenplay you can understand the characters and their motives, the pacing is spot on as well which really helps with immersion and I was engaged through out the movie. Also through Ryan Gosling's fantastic performance and brilliant direction by Nicolas Refn you learn so much about the "the driver" played by Gosling through facial expressions and hand gestures that tell you how he feels in a certain situation whether it be very panicked, calm or angry and he is also a likeable character as well despite him saying so little. Other great performances in this movie from Bryan Cranston as always, also great performances from Albert Brooks and Ron Perlman who play convincing villain's and also think Carey Mulligan was great in this movie as well. But the most impressive thing in this movie is how nothing feels fake whether it may small irrelevant things like what a character may say or action they do usually through violence you can see this has a genuine effect on a character and it is something they don't enjoy doing but have no choice specially with the one the villain's Albert Brooks and Gosling as well. lastly I want to mention the score which is very 80's like but is very catchy and also has meaning through out the movie as well.Read more ›
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Format: Blu-ray
A very self-conscious throwback to 70s and 80s neo-noir that never would have got off the starting block in those days, it’s not entirely surprising that Drive was beloved by critics but failed to parlay that festival acclaim into popular success. It’s a very thin tale of Ryan Gosling’s sometime getaway driver, sometime stunt driver who gets involved with neighbor Carey Mulligan and her recently paroled husband Oscar Isaac and, thanks to the long arm of coincidence and plot contrivance, ends up putting them in harm’s way when a one-off job to repay a prison debt goes wrong and leads back to some very nasty people who are bankrolling Gosling and Bryan Cranston’s dream of a stock car driving team. On one level everything happens as you expect it to in this sort of film, but with such emphasis on style and mood that the plot is paper thin and the promised action and drama rarely materialises: for a film called Drive about a getaway driver, there’s probably no more than five minutes of not particularly impressive driving in the whole film, and none of it can hold a candle to anything in the films it apes like Walter Hill’s minimalist but much more substantial The Driver.

With a more interesting lead it might have played better, but unfortunately while Gosling seems to be aiming for a blank slate performance that the audience can project their own interpretations onto, he’s far too limited and not nearly charismatic enough to pull off alternating the same two notes of impassive professionalism when driving and inflicting physical damage on the bad guys and going for endless blank pauses before giving a small goofy self-satisfied smile and finally delivering his dialogue when with characters he likes.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This movie initially reminded me of Michael Mann's cinematography of the 1980s, in terms of the sound track, the vibrant colours, the use of landscapes and modes where the heroic protagonists occupy a somewhat secret world, away from ordinary concerns. There is a feel of stylishness and emotional intensity and sexual subtext and strong violence. However, where this splits from a Mann production is that at times the film has no dialogue - instead the viewer has to rely on gestures and or facial descriptions and that in itself can be disconcerting. Therefore, it is quite understandable that people will not like this type of storytelling and will reach for volume control on the remote.

One of the outstanding scenes was the elevator sequence, which was essentially a series of striking visuals and explicit imagery that's a key example of how the film conveys so much through emotions and through the moving image as opposed to the use of any spoken narrative. The use of very capable Bryan Cranston as Shannon is great casting, he seems to have such a far ranging palette of characterisations. The whole casting of the film is good, and in some ways rather quirky.

To sum up then, this is a good neo-noir crime thriller film that for me really delivers. That said, and I hate to sound repetitive, but I can appreciate why there detractors as my partner is one of them.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
With the title "Drive" and the tag line "Get in. Get Out. Get Away" one could be forgiven for thinking that this was a fast paced heist movie focused on long car chase get-away sequences. It isn't. Less 'Fast and Furious' and more 'Subdued and Serious'. The film starts with a getaway drive that rather sets the tone of the film; our driver says very little and only picks up the pace if cornered at which point he can and will do whatever he has to.

Arguably our driver is either mysterious or astonishingly lacking substance; new to an apartment he quickly develops a bond with his neighbour. When the neighbours husband needs a favour things go terribly wrong, and with the driver's life threatened, but more importantly the neighbour and her child's life threatened, driver does everything he has to to keep them safe. At times this gets very gory, and there are those who will question the need to be quite so graphic. Drive does not glorify violence by any means, but does tell us a lot about Driver whose quiet demeanour could otherwise be mistaken for passive or apathetic.

Pros:
- Stunning visuals and sound. Fans of 80's Michael Mann films will be happy in this respect.
- A serious and engaging story for the more patient viewer.

Cons:
- Many will be put off by the graphic violence. Some will say it is unnecessary, although probably most will disagree.
- What for many will be an interesting albeit quiet protagonist, will for others be soulless and borderline sociopathic.

Bottom Line:
- Engaging and stylish for the patient.
- Tedious and one dimensional for the impatient.
- Horrific for those with weaker constitutions.
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