Drive 2011

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(361) IMDb 7.8/10
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A Hollywood stunt performer who moonlights as a wheelman discovers that a contract has been put on him after a heist gone wrong.

Starring:
Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Starring Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Christina Hendricks, Ron Perlman, Albert Brooks, Ryan Gosling, Oscar Isaac
Director Nicolas Winding Refn
Genres Drama, Thriller
Studio ICON HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 30 January 2012
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Starring Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Christina Hendricks, Ron Perlman, Albert Brooks, Ryan Gosling, Oscar Isaac
Director Nicolas Winding Refn
Genres Drama, Thriller
Studio ICON HOME ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 30 January 2012
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Richard on 13 Feb 2012
Format: Blu-ray
With the title "Drive" and the tag line "Get in. Get Out. Get Away" one could be forgiven for thinking that this was a fast paced heist movie focused on long car chase get-away sequences. It isn't. Less 'Fast and Furious' and more 'Subdued and Serious'. The film starts with a getaway drive that rather sets the tone of the film; our driver says very little and only picks up the pace if cornered at which point he can and will do whatever he has to.

Arguably our driver is either mysterious or astonishingly lacking substance; new to an apartment he quickly develops a bond with his neighbour. When the neighbours husband needs a favour things go terribly wrong, and with the driver's life threatened, but more importantly the neighbour and her child's life threatened, driver does everything he has to to keep them safe. At times this gets very gory, and there are those who will question the need to be quite so graphic. Drive does not glorify violence by any means, but does tell us a lot about Driver whose quiet demeanour could otherwise be mistaken for passive or apathetic.

Pros:
- Stunning visuals and sound. Fans of 80's Michael Mann films will be happy in this respect.
- A serious and engaging story for the more patient viewer.

Cons:
- Many will be put off by the graphic violence. Some will say it is unnecessary, although probably most will disagree.
- What for many will be an interesting albeit quiet protagonist, will for others be soulless and borderline sociopathic.

Bottom Line:
- Engaging and stylish for the patient.
- Tedious and one dimensional for the impatient.
- Horrific for those with weaker constitutions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 April 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This movie initially reminded me of Michael Mann's cinematography of the 1980s, in terms of the sound track, the vibrant colours, the use of landscapes and modes where the heroic protagonists occupy a somewhat secret world, away from ordinary concerns. There is a feel of stylishness and emotional intensity and sexual subtext and strong violence. However, where this splits from a Mann production is that at times the film has no dialogue - instead the viewer has to rely on gestures and or facial descriptions and that in itself can be disconcerting. Therefore, it is quite understandable that people will not like this type of storytelling and will reach for volume control on the remote.

One of the outstanding scenes was the elevator sequence, which was essentially a series of striking visuals and explicit imagery that's a key example of how the film conveys so much through emotions and through the moving image as opposed to the use of any spoken narrative. The use of very capable Bryan Cranston as Shannon is great casting, he seems to have such a far ranging palette of characterisations. The whole casting of the film is good, and in some ways rather quirky.

To sum up then, this is a good neo-noir crime thriller film that for me really delivers. That said, and I hate to sound repetitive, but I can appreciate why there detractors as my partner is one of them.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mam2Three78 on 23 Dec 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this film, loved the way it's filmed, music etc. however it's not for everyone. There are moments where no one speaks and characters facial expression are enough. There is some violence although not as much or as bad as some say. All within context of the film. As with all films, it's personal preference - I liked it, husband didn't. He thought it was boring. Look at the actors in it, or the director. If you've seen/like their previous work then watch it. If not, then don't!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Sep 2012
Format: DVD
Drive is an odd film, its hero is strangely other-worldly in his platonic romance with another man's wife. Yet at the same time he is capable of extreme violence (lots of skull crushing noises for your delectation). In between extreme action he drifts a bit driving the lonely streets in search of an arthouse meme. I thought the ending was a bit of a cop-out but it is otherwise a rather good modern version of a chivalric geste (the noble hero, the damsel in distress, the condign punishment visited on the evil) delivered by actors who all count to two before emoting. The action, when it came, made the dreamy stuff acceptable. Some others have a different view and you need to think about this before watching.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Manish P on 18 May 2012
Format: Blu-ray
This is a brilliant movie, it is very subtle and has a gentle pace. It is very 80's and fans of the Grand Theft Auto series will find familiarities with it and Vice City, especially the sound track with is brilliant, Nightcall has become one of my favourite songs. Though it is not for thrill seekers, it does have some getaway and shootout sequences.It's story will captivate you and Ryan Gosling performance as the strong, silent type is brilliant.
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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Aidan J. McQuade on 23 Oct 2011
Format: DVD
Ryan Gosling plays a stunt driver who supplements his income by driving getaways. The extended opening sequence is a brilliantly tense depiction of what this entails and why he has the reputation for being so good at it.

However, just as it appears that he might be getting a break to the (legitimate) big time, with an opportunity to drive racing cars for a new team being set up by his boss, Bryan Cranston, and funded by two shady businessmen, played with sublime menace by Albert Brooks and Ron Perlman, Gosling's character falls in love with his neighbour, Carey Mulligan, a young mother with a husband in prison. When the husband is released it transpires that he owes a lot of money to unnamed mobsters and is required to pull a robbery to pay this off. Hence Gosling agrees to do the proverbial "one last job" to help the family.

Of course all double-crossing hell breaks loose.

This movie pulls together a number of "retro" elements - much of the lighting, styling and soundtrack in the movie are reminicent of the Miami Vice tv series, the plot is straight from 1940's film noir, Gosling's unnamed man of few words refers to Clint Eastwood's signature Sergio Leone roles - to make something quite original - with startlingly graphic violence.

It is true that much of this is actually off-screen but the sound of breaking bones and collapsing faces is distressing enough. This verges on the gratuitious, but, I think, remains just on the right side of the line as it is used by the director to build tension by putting into the mind of the viewers what will become of the protagonist and those he loves should they fall prey to the mobsters who have set much of the plot in motion.
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