Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£6.99
  • RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £3.00 (30%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £1.15
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Paperback – 13 Jan 2011


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.99
£3.92 £3.92

Frequently Bought Together

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us + To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Persuading, Convincing, and Influencing Others + Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone To Take Action
Price For All Three: £21.97

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.15
Trade in Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.15, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; Main edition (13 Jan 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184767769X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847677693
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (96 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,493 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the author of four provocative books about the changing world of work -- including the New York Times bestsellers, A WHOLE NEW MIND and DRIVE, which together have been translated into 27 languages. Described by the Financial Times as "rapidly acquiring international guru status," Pink lectures on business, innovation, and economic transformation to corporations and universities around the world. He held is last "real job" in the White House, where he served from 1995 to 1997 as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore.

Product Description

Review

Pink is rapidly acquiring international guru status . . . He is an engaging writer, who challenges and provokes. --Financial Times

These lessons are worth repeating, and if more companies feel emboldened to follow Mr. Pink's advice, then so much the better. --Wall Street Journal

Inspiring. --Guardian

As Dan Pink's new book Drive argues, financial incentives are no longer enough to give a business an edge: in an economy driven by ideas and creativity, it's more effective to give workers a sense of purpose, of mastery, of autonomy over their time and their tasks. Because the only certainty in the decade to come is that disruptive change is going to continue to catch out businesses that are unprepared.
--David Rowan, Daily Telegraph

About the Author

Daniel H. Pink is the author of the long-running New York Times and BusinessWeek bestseller A Whole New Mind. He has written for the New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Fast Company and Wired, where he is a contributing editor. He has provided analysis for CNN, CNBC,ABC, NPR and other networks in the U.S. and abroad. Pink lectures on economic transformation and the new workplace at corporations, associations and universities around the world, and was a keynote speaker at TED's 2009 Global Conference in Oxford. He lives in Washington DC, with his family.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By AK TOP 500 REVIEWER on 19 Dec 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us Daniel H. Pink attempts a Malcolm Gladwell meets the One Minute Manager (The One Minute Manager) approach to getting some well known (and less than surprising) but not universally adapted findings about motivation across to the general public.

To start off with, the main theme of the book, namely that the currently widely practiced pay for performance schemes hardly produce an improvement in the latter (and often lead to a drop in intrinsic motivation) in white collar or 'creative' environments is certainly correct and additional repetition of the message cannot harm. This is the reason I gave the book a 4 star rating, even if I find it more of a 3 star effort based on its content alone.

However Herzberg's Motivation to Work laid the main themes well enough a long time ago (and has been recognized as the classic in the field), so if you are familiar with his 'money is a hygiene factor and not a motivator' theme (so as soon as you pay people enough to take the money discussion off the table, it is best to leave it there) there will be little new for you here.

The book starts with a brief introduction on what the author calls Motivation 1.0 and 2.0, the latter being more or less in line with Taylorist management thinking.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert Selden on 28 July 2011
Format: Paperback
"DRIVE" is a book that has been needed for a long time. It's about what motivates all of us and in particular, the misconceptions some people have, notably business leaders, about the subject. As author Daniel H. Pink points out in the introduction "I will show that much of what we believe about the subject just isn't so".

Pink does a great job of reviewing the literature and history of motivation in a way that is practical and easy to read. Above all, he explains things in a way that also makes it relevant for practising managers to implement. Pink pulls all of this together in what he describes as "Type I" behaviour - the things that really motivate us.

The book is in three parts. Part one explores the deficiencies of the reward/punishment dichotomy (after reading this, one wonders why so many organisations continue to pursue such fruitless processes as "pay for performance"). Part two introduces the three elements of "Type I" behaviour - autonomy, mastery and purpose. Part three provides some guidelines for implementing "Type I".

I really liked this book. As a keen student of motivation and one who has both managed others and trained many managers, it fits well with the philosophy I first picked up in the writings of Frederick Herzberg who popularised the "motivator/satisfier" model of motivation.

I've read some of the other reviews that suggest this book may be "basic" and "shallow". Basic it may be, and perhaps there is also some unnecessary padding. However, take it from one who has managed as few as two people to as many as 40 in three different organisations in both line and functional roles, these ideas do work in practise. And isn't that the real test?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
71 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Lloyd Gordon on 28 Feb 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Summary: an important book that discusses an important topic. Everything is explained very well and laid out clearly. If you need to motivate people, whether that's employees, co-workers or even children, then you'll learn from this book.

Sometimes I wish Amazon would allow you to give a book half a star. Because, if I could, I'd rate this book 3.5 out of 5 rather than 3 stars.

It's a decent book that discusses an important topic - how and why people are motivated to do everything from the mundane to the marvelous.

The basic argument presented by Pink - which he bases upon proper research - is that for simple, 'boring' tasks, such as manual work, human beings respond to financial rewards. So, if you pay me £10 per hour to shovel coal, I'll work harder for you than if you only paid me £5 (all things being equal).

However, for more complex, professional managerial or 'white collar' activities, this model of pay and reward doesn't work. Indeed, it can be counter-productive and can damage motivation and productivity.

To learn why you should buy the book :)

The problem for me, is once you 'get' this main idea the book has few solid examples of how this theory has or could be applied.

Pink is a great writer. He has a talent for summarising the complex. He does this so well early on the book that I felt he had to keep repeating himself. Whilst I don't mind an argument being reinforced, this one is so obvious once you're exposed to it, that I felt the book had become padded out towards the end.

This is not to devalue the concepts presented. Absolutely not. I only wish more managers read this material and applied it. We'd all enjoy happier and more productive working lives if we did.

Although it's easy for me to be an 'armchair critic', I didn't enjoy this work from Pink as much as I'd expected.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback