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Dream Boy


Price: £23.69 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Stephan Bender, Maximillian Roeg, Randy Wayne, Owen Beckman, Michele Adams
  • Directors: James Bolton
  • Producers: Dream Boy
  • Format: Import, PAL, Widescreen
  • Subtitles: German
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Run Time: 86.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001XJBMDG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 261,117 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Germany released, PAL/Region 0 DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), English ( Dolby Digital 5.1 ), German ( Subtitles ), ANAMORPHIC WIDESCREEN (1.78:1), SPECIAL FEATURES: Interactive Menu, Photo Gallery, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Based on the novel by Jim Grimsley, 'Dream Boy' chronicles the relationship between two gay teenagers in the rural south in the late 70's. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Berlin International Film Festival, ...Dream Boy

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Son of Nietzsche on 11 Jun. 2009
Format: DVD
Director James Bolton has done a truly excellent job of the (inevitably difficult) task of transposing Jim Grimsley's superb novel to screen. (Those who have read the novel will be pleased to note that the film remains largely faithful to the book - and viewing it does not subvert the novel in ways that film adaptations have the tendency to do.)

15-year-old Nathan (Stephan Bender) arrives with his parents into a small, religious, farming community in the South. He quickly notices 17-year-old Roy (Max Roeg), his next-door neighbour, but being painfully-shy, it takes Nathan a while to strike up conversation with Roy. An intense bond soon develops between the two, building by way of eye contact and body language, as appropriate to the oppressive small-town, backwater, environment in which they live. Their almost-wordless desire for one another is eventually consummated. Jealousy intervenes: Roy is surprised and upset to discover his younger friend's apparently-skilled 'technique', and he cold-shoulders Nathan - until his curiosity is aroused upon discovering that the latter is spending his nights sleeping in a nearby wood...

Various sub-plots abound, leading to an unexpected, arresting denouement; to reveal any more would be unfair to the newcomer to this story. While shot on a low-budget, the actors comfortably grow into their roles, providing authentic performances with difficult material. Particular note in this regard to the outstandingly-moving portrayals of Nathan's conflicted mother (Diana Scarwid), and his tortured, multi-faceted father (Tom Ryan). The cinematography is confident and accomplished, supported by an extremely strong musical score.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 100 REVIEWER on 17 Mar. 2012
Format: DVD
I loved the romance in this film and thought both actors were amazing. Max Roeg was ideal in the role of Roy for me, as the film led you to see events largely through the other boy's eyes (also very convincingly played by Stephan Bender). The creation of tenderness between the two is touching and heartbreaking because you know Roy really loves Nathan even though he rejects him at one point, and isn't particularly articulate about it. The supernatural part of the film is also very well handled and very atmospherically led up to, with interesting psychological undercurrents passing between the four boys in the woods. The main thing I liked less was the incest motif with the father; it feels misjudged to me to have it mixed up in a supernatural tale combined with an achingly romantic feel between the boys. On the other hand, it is supposed to reflect the purity of their adolescent love, and the incredible change for Nathan, and the parallel is made clear at one point. It's also true that it creates a dark, foreboding atmosphere, like the bank of heavy cloud we see low over the Louisiana landscape. I just think it would have been better if maybe the abuse had not been sexual, but it needs to be something Nathan can't talk about. There's no solution really. It is built into the story but it means I can't like it as much as I want to! I also don't like the ending that much, although I thought the book was somehow even less satisfactory! But everything that happens on that bus and between the boys that speaks of the heart means that the film matters to me anyway. It's one of those films I can't have a clearcut feeling about, but it really does take you into a feeling of intimacy and supernatural intensity, and has undeniable originality.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By critic on 27 Dec. 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A lot has already been said about this film, but here's my two pence worth.

The film falls roughly into three sections, and for me, the first two are excellent. Not to everyone's taste, granted, and you can criticise moments here and there, but if the film had maintained this standard, I'd have given it six stars. The cast is excellent - I know Stephan Bender has come in for some criticism, but again, as far as I'm concerned, he does a first rate job.

The problem comes with the final part - the camping and haunted house scenes. Here Bolton loses it - too many scenes are badly directed and edited. The actors do their best, but given the material and direction, are struggling. The film suddenly veers from romance to Southern American Gothic, with jarring effect.

The ending is, shall we say, controversial. What does it mean? It was easier to bring off in the book, when you have the advantage of internal monologue. Here it is just a mess, and the last scene of all lacks any sort of impact.

The more ... shall we say, intimate ... scenes are handled well (apart from the embarrassing episode in the graveyard!). They are fairly explicit, but with no shots below the waist. Having said that, the scene in the haunted house [no spoilers!] is gratuitous, badly edited, and completely unnecessary as portrayed here.

So ... is it worth watching? Very worth while - despite the caveats. It is very much of a 'curate's egg', and not to everyone's taste, but, as I say, I would give parts of it six stars!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Son of Nietzsche on 1 April 2009
Format: DVD
Director James Bolton has done a truly excellent job of the (inevitably difficult) task of transposing Jim Grimsley's superb novel to screen. (Those who have read the novel will be pleased to note that the film remains largely faithful to the book - and viewing it does not subvert the novel in ways that film adaptations have the tendency to do.)

15-year-old Nathan (Stephan Bender) arrives with his parents into a small, religious, farming community in the South. He quickly notices 17-year-old Roy (Max Roeg), his next-door neighbour, but being painfully-shy, it takes Nathan a while to strike up conversation with Roy. An intense bond soon develops between the two, building by way of eye contact and body language, as appropriate to the oppressive small-town, backwater, environment in which they live. Their almost-wordless desire for one another is eventually consummated. Jealousy intervenes: Roy is surprised and upset to discover his younger friend's apparently-skilled 'technique', and he cold-shoulders Nathan - until his curiosity is aroused upon discovering that the latter is spending his nights sleeping in a nearby wood...

Various sub-plots abound, leading to an unexpected, arresting denouement; to reveal any more would be unfair to the newcomer to this story. While shot on a low-budget, the actors comfortably grow into their roles, providing authentic performances with difficult material. Particular note in this regard to the outstandingly-moving portrayals of Nathan's conflicted mother (Diana Scarwid), and his tortured, multi-faceted father (Tom Ryan). The cinematography is confident and accomplished, supported by an extremely strong musical score.
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