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Drama (Deluxe Version)
 
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Drama (Deluxe Version)

YES
28 Jan 2008 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 4.21 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:23
30
2
1:21
30
3
6:29
30
4
8:32
30
5
4:42
30
6
5:17
30
7
3:45
30
8
4:27
30
9
3:40
30
10
7:30
30
11
5:36
30
12
1:08
30
13
3:16
30
14
5:56
30
15
2:53
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16
3:38

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 28 Jan 2008
  • Release Date: 28 Jan 2008
  • Label: Rhino/Elektra
  • Copyright: 2004 Rhino Entertainment Company, a Warner Music Group company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:18:33
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LBEOMW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 22,752 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Stotty on 6 Aug 2007
Format: Audio CD
While writing the follow up to 1978's Tormato, singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist, Rick Wakeman left the group.
This lineup of Yes is definitely the most controversial in the bands history. Combining the musical talents of Steve Howe, Chris Squire and Alan White with those of The Buggles (video killed the radio star anyone?) seemed a disasterous one. However, they got away with it and Drama stands for me as one of Yes' best efforts, despite being a somewhat neglected record.
OK Trevor Horn could never replace Jon Anderson on vocals, and most of the songs are crying out for his angelic tones. But there's a charm and sincerity about Horn's vocal style, and with Chris Squires distinctive backing vocal to supplement him, as well as Steve Howe mucking in, the vocal side of Drama is quite alright.
Geoff Downes is a revelation on keyboards, and he handles the 'widdly widdly' stuff excellently while throwing his own keyboarding style into the mix. It's no surprise that he would continue to work with Steve Howe on this type of music in the incredibly successful Asia.
As for Steve Howe, he plays some of his heaviest, most aggressive sounding guitar since 1974's Relayer, and the Chris Squire/Alan White rhythm section seems re energised and more driving than before.
The songs on Drama are first class. 'Machine Messiah' is a huge, moody behemoth of an opener with some superb melodies, great vocal harmonies, swirling keyboards and heavy metal guitar, hammered home with some great rolling bass, and thumping drums.
'White Car' is a beautifully sung track, but suffers from being a short song which ends almost as soon as it's begun.
'Does It Really Happen' is a pointer to the more commercial sounding music Yes would make in the 1980s.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Feb 2004
Format: Audio CD
Reading again and again how this recording is derided by comparing it to Anderson-era-Yes is particularly depressing, since this is a hell of a record in its own terms. Nobody seemed to like it when it appeared, while now more and more people realize how unjustly Drama was treated at the time. "Machine Messiah" and "Tempus Fugit" are sensational tracks. The rest is simply very good. Chris Squire's bass playing and Alan White's drumming in this CD are simply astounding. Yes, Jon Anderson is not there, but just listen to this music for what it is, without prejudice, and what you get is one of the prog-classics of all time.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By N. ADAMS on 3 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
Drama is a surprising album. Surprising because it unites one half of the "classic" Yes line up (Steve Howe, Alan White, Chris Squire) with 80's pop duo, "The Buggles" (Trevor Horn, Geoff Downes). On the face of it not the most likely of partnerships and one that for Yes fans would seem doomed to fail since this particular inacrnation of the band was less its principle songwriter and singer, Jon Anderson.
In their 70's heyday, Yes produced sprawling Prog-Rock epics that went under ungainly titles such as "The Revealing Science of God" or "The Gates of Delerium". But by the early 80's, Yes and other bands of their ilk were a spent force in musical terms; having the metaphoricals kicked out of them by the aggression and nihilism of Punk.
The Buggles at the time, however, were flush with the success of their Top 5 hit "Video Killed the Radio Star" a song which seemed to signal a fresh and succesful decade for pop and the new art form of the music video.
So in some ways The Buggles had more to lose than the remaining members of Yes by chancing their arms on this collabrative venture. But Sqiure et al still had their reputations as superlative musicians to think about and there was no way that this album was ever going to be compromise on that front. The resulting album was not therefore a curious pop-rock record but still an unashamedly prog one.
Hovever, the playing is less frilly and the presentation less wayward, benefting from the directness Horn and Downes were giving them. Although Horn's vocals don't come anywhere near to Jon Anderson's range and delicacy he manages to more than hold his own in what must been a very daunting situation to find himself in.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Jun 2001
Format: Audio CD
Magnificent - who would have thought that the Buggles would join Yes and improve the band after the awful "Tormato"?
Darker, more energetic and more powerful than any other Yes album, this benefits from the stimulus Howe, Squire and White took from the challenge of showing Anderson and Wakeman were NOT the be all and end all of Yes. All three veterans are on magnificent form.
I'm not a great White fan, but his percussion is world class on this. Squire is awesome, too, and we get to hear a lot more of his distinctive vocals, which blend perfectly with Horn's. Howe is his ususual inspired self.
And what of the new boys: Horn sounds similar to Anderson, but conveys a personality of his own (and his lyrics are much better). His magnificent production skills were already eveident here, too.
Downes proved himself to be the most tasteful and varied Yes keyboard player.
The compositions are wonderful: the stunning gravitas and variety of "Machine Messiah", the vibrant energy and melody of "Tempus Fugit", the atmospheres of "Into the Lens", the Haiku of "Man in a White Car"....
Buy this, put aside your prejudices and be amazed.
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