Dragonfly Falling (Shadows of the Apt Book 2) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.79
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dragonfly Falling (Shadows of the Apt) Paperback – Unabridged, 6 Feb 2009


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Unabridged, 6 Feb 2009
£0.52 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Tor (6 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230704158
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230704152
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 10.8 x 18.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 312,109 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Adrian Tchaikovsky was born in Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire before heading off to Reading to study psychology and zoology. For reasons unclear even to himself he subsequently ended up in law and has worked as a legal executive in both Reading and Leeds, where he now lives. Married, he is a keen live role-player and occasional amateur actor, has trained in stage-fighting, and keeps no exotic or dangerous pets of any kind, possibly excepting his son.

Product Description

Review

'Full of colourful drama and non-stop action involving mass warfare and personal combat.'
-- Fantasy Book Critic

About the Author

Adrian Tchaikovsky was born in Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire before heading off to Reading to study psychology and zoology. For reasons unclear even to himself he subsequently ended up in law and has worked as a legal executive in both Reading and Leeds, where he now lives. Married, he is a keen live role-player and occasional amateur actor, has trained in stage-fighting, and keeps no exotic or dangerous pets of any kind, possibly excepting his son.

Catch up with Adrian at www.shadowsoftheapt.com for further information about both himself and the insect-kinden, together with bonus material including short stories and artwork.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SteveA (UK) on 29 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
The action in Dragonfly Falling picks up right where Empire in Black and Gold left off. And for those who haven't read Empire yet, this review will contain some spoilers about what has gone on before. The Wasp Empire has suffered its first major setback but they are unrelenting and press ever onwards, intent on dominating the Lowlands. In this book we are introduced to some new characters, including the much talked about Emperor of the Wasp Empire, a paranoid and bored man who wants to carve out a destiny for himself unlike any ruler before him in Wasp history. He is also willing to work with anyone and do almost anything to avoid what he sees must happen. Whilst juggling the politicking and press of the army, he pursues his own dark ambition which introduces us to a new mysterious Kinden and the hint of a dark, old and very dangerous power. Magic, in the main, is regarded as nothing more than superstition and sleight of hand. Kinden's Art is the only real reflection of power outside of what we would consider normal, but once again Tchaikovsky makes us question what we think we know.

Stenwold Maker has been talking for decades about the threat of the Empire, and sadly, his words have not been heeded. Long ago he witnessed the fall of one city, and now the Wasps lay siege to the Ant city of Tark. Ants are some of the best soldiers in the world. Their hive mind makes them implacable, a unified fighting force that is incomparable to anyone and yet as a race they are not able to adjust quickly and adapt to new ways. The Wasps have many artificers from many conquered Kinden, who bring deadly war machines the Ants have not faced before. Facing new tactics and a new way to wage war, the result is a messy conflict to put it mildly.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Nicholson on 29 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
The second book in the 'Shadow of the Apt' series by Adrian Tchaikovsky.

This novel continues where book one left off; we continue to follow several characters on a sequential basis as they try to stem the tide of conquest by the Wasp Empire. A faction that has continually displayed covert yet aggressive intentions towards the rest of the continent (The Lowlands).

This book is quite exceptional...let me explain. I've read many trilogies/series in which the second book has some minor improvements compared to the first; better because the author has had some time to more clearly defined his ideas for both his story and characters. And often the quality of writing and story telling have improve slightly as well.

However, what impressed me most about this second effort is the degree of improvement found in this book compared to the first; improvement mainly in the quality of the prose that is used. The writing is more concise and written in such a way as to add to the suspense and intrigue of the situations that the main characters find themselves in. The narrative in this work just flowed better; if the story telling in book one was good, then it could easily be described as great for this second effort.

Also, as I mentioned before, the tale is told on a sequential basis, following about a half dozen or so characters in turn. As I approached the end of this book, I began to realize another unusual quality of this book. That being, that none, not one, of these tales was dull, boring or just plain 'fill'; all were intense, exciting and riveting. Few novels I've read with this 'sequential' format have ever accomplished this feat so well, as most have one or two segments that drag or hold little interest. Not so with this book!
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By James Long on 31 May 2009
Format: Paperback
After reading and enjoying Adrian Tchaikovsky's debut novel Empire in Black and Gold last year, I was looking forward to Dragonfly Falling, the second instalment in the Shadows of the Apt series. While Empire did have its drawbacks, I saw enough promise there to believe that Tchaikovsky could deliver a really good series: the world was fascinating, the storyline had the potential to become suitably epic, and there was some good characterisation. All I wanted from Dragonfly Falling was more of the same, but on a more dynamic, epic scale.

Boy, did I get it - and then some.

Possibly the most pleasing aspect of this novel is the plot. While the storyline of Empire was solid, it took a while to get going and generally you had a feeling as to where it was going. Dragonfly, by contrast, explodes into life from the first page with an epic siege (one of two - yes, two - sieges in the novel) as the Wasp Empire clashes with the ant-kinden city-state of Tark. Around this brutal storyline Tchaikovsky skilfully weaves a number of sub-plots that carry on the stories of characters from the first novel, as well as introducing a number of new faces. Make no mistake, this is a truly epic story that combines hard-edged action with subtle webs-within-webs of politics, and Tchaikovsky deserves serious credit for the way he manages to juggle the respective story lines. The pacing is pleasingly fast throughout, with not a dull moment to be had.

Characterisation (which arguably was a little hit and miss in Empire) is cranked up several notches in Dragonfly. The novel continues the stories of the main protagonists from the first book, and it's good to see them develop more fully this time around.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback