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The Dragon Revenant (Deverry) [Mass Market Paperback]

Katharine Kerr
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

31 Dec 1991 Deverry
For years the provinces of Deverry have been in turmoil; now the conflict escalates with the kidnapping of Rhodry Maelwaedd, heir to the throne of Aberwyn.  Intent on rescuing him, his beloved Jill and the elven wizard Salamander infiltrate the distant land of Bardex, where Rhodry is held captive.  Tied to Deverry by obligation and circumstance, the immortal wizard Nevyn begins to see that all the kingdom's problems can be traced to a single source: a master of dark magics, backed by a network of evil that stretches across the sea.  Now Nevyn understands that he too is being lured away to Bardek--and into a subtle, deadly trap designed especially for him.

Katharine Kerr's novels of the Kingdom of Deverry unfold in a world of stunning richness and depth.  Her vivid portrayal of characters caught in a complex web of fate and magic captures the imagination with a realism that few can match.  Now she retums to this enchanted kingdom, where the wheels of destiny are tuming anew.


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 401 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group; First THUS edition (31 Dec 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553289098
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553289091
  • Product Dimensions: 3 x 10.5 x 17.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,005,316 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Katharine Kerr was born in Ohio, and moved to San Francisco Bay Area in 1962, where she has lived ever since. She has read extensively in the fields of classical archeology, and medieval and dark ages history and literature, and these influences are clear in her work. Her epic Deverry series has won widespread praise and millions of fans around the world.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
151 of 151 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great continuation of the series! 23 Mar 1997
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Overseas readers who don't want to own two copies should know this book also appears under the title 'Dragonspell: The Southern Seas', Volume IV in the Deverry Series from HarperCollins Publishers.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The Dragon Revenant (or Dragonspell, whichever edition you own) is the fourth in the Deverry Series, where Rhodry, the last heir to the vast estates of his clan, is in the hands of the Bardekian Hawks and the dark dweomer: Jill and Salamander, his lover and his brother, set out to rescue him from slavery.
This book does not show the time-interlacing typical of Katharine Kerr: it remains firmly in the present, following Jill and Salamander's hunt for Rhodry across Bardek, Rhodry's life as a slave, and Nevyn's efforts to save the kingdom and bring Jill to her destiny of studying the dweomer. However, if he manages this, is is predicted that he will finally die, and Nevyn's greatest fear is that he may not live long enough to complete his self-imposed task of killing the leader of the dark dweomer, the Old One.
This is a good wind-up to the Deverry series, although some of the storyline based around Rhodry is a little slow. Kerr classicists will also miss her typical time-changing habit, although the introduction of Salamander gives the book a nice new character to focus on.
For new readers, this is perhaps not the best book to start with, but for established Kerr fans, especially those who have read and enjoyed the rest of the Deverry series, I recommend it highly. It fills in some much-needed links to Jill's history and Rhodry's, which come in very useful in the Westlands Cycle series.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good all around fantasy 21 Aug 1998
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I read this book over the summer and enjoyed it very much. The three main characters; Jill, Rhodry, and the wizard, are very well developed. I was moved to the point of being disgusted with Rhodry's self centeredness and self absorbed behavior typical of a spoiled monarch's son. He is the only survivor of his older siblings and becomes only heir to the throne, but there is a plot afoot to get rid of him and start a war that will devistate the people of Deverry. Then there is the wizard who is responsible for the deaths of Rhodry and Jill in their previous lives and wants to correct it. Reincarnation and other beliefs are expressed in this book and make it more interesting. Half of the book describes Rhodry's exile and captivity arranged by his captors until Jill and the wizard come to rescue him and the book then goes into describing their escape. It is slow moving at times, but has a very good ending. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in fantasy.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not terrible, but Kerr can do way better... 3 Nov 2002
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Fans of Deverry might want to give me a beating here, but in my opinion- Kerr is definitely capable of better stuff. Until I got to this book, everything she put out amazed me. I even gave Bristling Wood 5 stars. Through out Dragon Revenant there were some traces of the Katherine Kerr I know and love- especially in the beginning and the end, but the middle (the entire portion that involved Rhodry as a slave) bored me and dragged out for way too long. I kept waiting for Kerr to erupt into one of her trademark flashback sequences- but was left hanging. I respect the possibility that maybe she was bored of doing this, but I still want to know how the Silver Dagger group's origin story turns out- a tale left unfinished from the middle of the last book.
I have a confession to make... Halfway through, I quite frankly gave up on this book and went on to read twelve other books. But for the first time in my life I resumed reading a book I had given up on- This was solely because of how much I enjoyed her first three books, and my hope that the next few would be up to her usual par.
A few things did impress me here though. Salamander- a very interesting character is fleshed out for the first time. Kerr's dialogue and Deverry's culture give her works a wonderful feel. I would have enjoyed a grander resolution between Rhodry and his brother/enemy Rhys, but the ending made the book worth while with several surprises and a very neat closure to the whole series. Or was this just a bridge? On to Omens and Exile for the answers I go. And I can't wait to get to Dragon Mage since I previewed the first chapter- looks exciting!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great continuation of the series! 23 Mar 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Overseas readers who don't want to own two copies should know this book also appears under the title 'Dragonspell: The Southern Seas', Volume IV in the Deverry Series from HarperCollins Publishers
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars as good as the previous volumes` 11 Feb 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Kerr has a good series going here. While I always seem to compare stories to my two personal favorite authors, Terry Goodkind and Robert Jordan, this series has definitely landed a close third on my list behind Goodkind. I enjoy Celtic storylines and her characters do come to life well. It can slow down at times, but I am half way through and enjoy it. A book that I look forward to reading when I get home is a rare thing for me to find now days, and this series has supplied me with several.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good all around fantasy 21 Aug 1998
By Sokalkeep@yahoo.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I read this book over the summer and enjoyed it very much. The three main characters; Jill, Rhodry, and the wizard, are very well developed. I was moved to the point of being disgusted with Rhodry's self centeredness and self absorbed behavior typical of a spoiled monarch's son. He is the only survivor of his older siblings and becomes only heir to the throne, but there is a plot afoot to get rid of him and start a war that will devistate the people of Deverry. Then there is the wizard who is responsible for the deaths of Rhodry and Jill in their previous lives and wants to correct it. Reincarnation and other beliefs are expressed in this book and make it more interesting. Half of the book describes Rhodry's exile and captivity arranged by his captors until Jill and the wizard come to rescue him and the book then goes into describing their escape. It is slow moving at times, but has a very good ending. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in fantasy.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not terrible, but Kerr can do way better... 15 Mar 2000
By Dan Dean - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Fans of Deverry might want to give me a beating here, but in my opinion- Kerr is definitely capable of better stuff. Until I got to this book, everything she put out amazed me. I even gave Bristling Wood 5 stars. Through out Dragon Revenant there were some traces of the Katherine Kerr I know and love- especially in the beginning and the end, but the middle (the entire portion that involved Rhodry as a slave) bored me and dragged out for way too long. I kept waiting for Kerr to erupt into one of her trademark flashback sequences- but was left hanging. I respect the possibility that maybe she was bored of doing this, but I still want to know how the Silver Dagger group's origin story turns out- a tale left unfinished from the middle of the last book.
I have a confession to make... Halfway through, I quite frankly gave up on this book and went on to read twelve other books. But for the first time in my life I resumed reading a book I had given up on- This was solely because of how much I enjoyed her first three books, and my hope that the next few would be up to her usual par.
A few things did impress me here though. Salamander- a very interesting character is fleshed out for the first time. Kerr's dialogue and Deverry's culture give her works a wonderful feel. I would have enjoyed a grander resolution between Rhodry and his brother/enemy Rhys, but the ending made the book worth while with several surprises and a very neat closure to the whole series. Or was this just a bridge? On to Omens and Exile for the answers I go. And I can't wait to get to Dragon Mage since I previewed the first chapter- looks exciting!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fourth of the Ten (currently) in the Series 1 Aug 2006
By EquesNiger - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
For years the provinces of Deverry have been in turmoil; now the conflict escalates with the kidnapping of Rhodry Maelwaedd, heir to the throne of Aberwyn. Intent on rescuing him, his beloved Jill and the elven wizard Salamander infiltrate the distant land of Bardek, where Rhodry is held captive. Tied to Deverry by obligation and circumstance, the immortal wizard Nevyn begins to see that all the kingdom's problems can be traced to a single source: a master of dark magics, backed by a network of evil that stretches across the sea. Now Nevyn understands that he too is being lured to Bardek--and into a subtle, deadly trap designed especially for him.

Katherine Kerr's writing takes a bit of getting used to, but it's worth the effort. She approaches her stories with a Celtic storytelling mindset, which means she conveys events according to their significance to the story, as opposed to chronologically. Consequently, while the stories begin in the "present" (which is an elastic concept, anyway, in a fantasy setting), the events unfold, chapter wise, both in the "present" and in the distant past. This can be frustrating, at first, but Kerr's writing is heavily steeped in Pagan and Western Mystery tradition, and the Celtic setting (and mindset) of her characters means that time, or chronological time, is not essentially relevant. To be honest, I found the first book infuriating, as I spent a lot of time trying to adjust to the writing style. However, I found the story engrossing enough that I persevered, and by the second book was so hooked I've read all ten in her three series.

Kerr's story evolves around the concept of reincarnation, and unfinished business, and "karma", and fate. The same souls recur again and again, just in new bodies, over the course of the centuries over which the story unfolds.

Kerr's world is one of High Fantasy, populated by Elves, Men, and Dwarves, as well as faeries/elementals, which she terms the "Wildfolk". However, hers is a slightly more dark, dangerous and less clear cut world than the works of other High Fantasy authors, not the least due to the fact that someone who was your friend in a former life can re-emerge in the story centuries later as a foe, and vice versa. There is a tremendous amount of magic, but it's the magic of the Western Mystery tradition (quite a bit of Golden Dawn and even Enochiana), and that of R.J. Stewarts Faery tradition. There are dragons, and giant beast men.

The Elves are a fallen race, driven out of their magnificent and palatial cities centuries before by invaders, and who now roam the plains as primitives. They possess the potential to be superlative magicians, but the knowledge was lost in the fall of their civilization. Humans, though warlike and shorter lived, have preserved this knowledge, but guard it jealously. The Wildfolk, basically magic incarnate, are unhinged from the effects of "karma", but lack permanence of personality, and cannot grow or develop, cursed to stagnation. The Dwarves are a secretive mystery, entrenched within the earth. Each has something to offer the other, and the story that unfolds is the story of this "technology" exchange, of sorts, between them.

Fans of Marion Zimmer Bradley, who clearly influenced Kerr, will be enraptured by this series, as will fans of Kate Eliott, who Kerr, herself, clearly influenced. It's phenomenal! Devotees of the New Age, Esoteric or Occult will find themselves nodding and smiling as they read, and sincerely hoping Kerr's writing will do for the Western Mystery and Faery traditions what Bradley's has done for Wicca.
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