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  • Draft 7.30 [VINYL]
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Draft 7.30 [VINYL]

26 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl (7 April 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Warp
  • ASIN: B000089HDA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,276,074 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. XYLIN ROOM
2. IV VV IV VV VIII
3. 6IE.CR
4. TAPR
5. SURRIPERE
6. THEME OF SUDDEN ROUNDABOUT
7. VL AL 5
8. P.:NTIL
9. V-PROC
10. RENIFORM PULS

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. Baker on 7 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD
I've listened to all seven Autechre albums today. And I'm still confused by those saying this is a return to pre-Confield ideas. Sure, the noises here aren't anywhere near as alien or mangled as on the previous album, but whilst that was full of incredibly eerie synths, they appear to be missing here. Drum patterns that are insanely weird and complex, yet subtle and inviting at the same time, welcome you to pretty much every track. And they guide you through. And leave you at the other side. Sure, there are synths in there, but in this case the drums really are the focus point. Which leaves it, in my book, the least accessible Ae album to date.
The drum programming is downright genius. From the insane hip-hop swagger of 6IE.CR and V-Proc, to the complete lack of time sig in Theme of Sudden Roundabout and the lack of anything that makes up an actual drum rhythm in Tapr, the rhythms are mind boggling. But one can't help feel there could be something to accompany them. Tapr has it's sinister stop/start synths, closer Reniform Puls is covered in blips and pongs, and they work brilliantly. I wonder what made them decide to condense most synth work down to little sounds that are barely distinguishable from the drums.
Now, I must talk about Surripere. For it is one of my favourite Autechre tracks. I wish more of the album was like this. A driving rhythm from simple drums and clicks opens the track, fronted by a sinister and slightly foreboding synth. It's incredibly beautiful, and just shows they guys can still write utterly stunning music, rather than utterly stunning rhythms. Halfway through, the beat takes over, and turns into an intense industrial mash-up. I'm waiting for more stuff like this. It's a move on from Confield, but it's a fantastic one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MR K D VALTERS on 7 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
Autechre's last album, Confield, was regarded by many as oppressively difficult, even verging on unlistenable. Others considered it their best work to date. Both groups will find things to like and dislike about Draft 7.30, but on the whole it's those who hoped that Autechre would retreat in some way from the "Confield" world of academic noise that will enjoy this album most. Complex rhythms still dominate, but distinct melodies are fighting to be heard in Draft 7.30, giving the album a warmth that their most recent releases have lacked.
This is most evident in "Surripere", the 11-minute epic that forms the centrepiece of the album. The track begins with the sort of synth melody Autechre haven't used since "Amber", and despite the violent intervention of what sounds like a very large boot squelching in mud (which forms the rhythm), the melody continues to form the basis of the track. P.:NTIL is another standout track: the crunching rhythm is secondary to the melody provided by what can only be described as paranoid wind chimes.
That said, this album can be just as "difficult" as Confield, and those hoping for some nice ambient electronica as an accompaniment to sleep are advised to look elsewhere. Draft 7.30 demands full attention and listening to the whole thing in one go is quite an undertaking. However, fans won't be disappointed, and Autechre may regain some listeners who were alienated by Confield's clinical coldness. Draft 7.30 feels like an altogether more organic affair.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
If you're a fan of Autechre, then you'll know what to expect. This sees a return to the groups electro roots, and although there's definitely recognisable elements of Confield (groaning, straining, metalic spitting and hissing) you can hear ideas from LP5 and EP7 here too (gradual track decomposition etc). This is not to say there isn't anything new here, because its got a totally different feel to previous work. Its the most funky album so far, the rhythms are bouncy, exciting and energetic. It's also suprisingly dark in places.
Confield was critisised at the time as sounding too alien (never justified in my opinion) and this is, in places. far more accessible to new listeners. For those familar, it's one more excellent album from an excellent artist, it's sure to keep you listening until their next release.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Alex Noble on 5 Jan. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is a great album, if Confield left you feeling empty (which I suspect was it's aim) then this should set things straight. This is not a warm album like LP5, but it's not cold and empty like Confield was either. It has more of the mechanical beats that Confield had, but it's mixed with the synth of LP5. This album actually has tune, tune which you can hear and remember, and it's not repetitive either, it's a great listen. Some of their albums coulden't be compared to any of their others, which is what made them good, but the thing that makes this one good is that it can be compared to all of them, it's a good middle point, it's like a definition of Autechre. Not perfect, but much more accessible. I would merrily listen to this twice in a row.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Newton on 14 Oct. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Having only listened to `Amber' and `Tri Repeatae' prior to `Draft 7.30', I now understand what is meant by Autechre's `difficult period'. Unless your head is really into electronica in a massive way you will probably, like me, find this record highly inaccessible.

The duo present the listener here with a virtually impregnable wall of seemingly patternless, distorted beats, abrasive sounds, drones and noises. To the uninitiated ear it is just so hard to get into. Despite repeated listens I was really struggling to find anything so old-fashioned as a hook or memorable rhythm. The most striking track is the lengthy `Surripere', which starts with a hypnotic, regular beat over wonderfully eerie and atmospheric synth washes (this appeals to the Boards of Canada fan in me) but little by little it is deconstructed into an alien mechanized mash up until the end of the track bears no resemblance to the beginning.

But, weirdly, this record is compelling and I still found myself coming back to it again and again. Perhaps the trick is to approach it from an abstract viewpoint and just savour the incredibly complex programming and layered sounds here. I also believe that Booth and Brown do know what they are doing and still have the greatest of respect for their work. Be warned, though, this is not one for the casual dabbler!
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