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Dracula (arr. Riesman)


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Dracula (arr. Riesman) + Glass: Powaqqatsi + Kundun: MUSIC FROM THE ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK
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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 Dec 2008)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Orange Mountain Music Inc
  • ASIN: B000NDIAW4
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,680 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Dracula
2. Journey To The Inn
3. The Inn
4. The Crypt
5. Carriage Without A Driver
6. The Castle
7. The Drawing Room
8. 'Excellent, Mr. Renfield'
9. The Three Consorts Of Dracula
10. The Storm
11. Horrible Tragedy
12. London Fog
13. In The Theatre
14. Lucy's Bitten
15. Seward Sanatorium
16. Renfield
17. In His Cell
18. When The Dream Comes
19. Dracula Enters
20. Or A Wolf
See all 27 tracks on this disc

Product Description

In 2004 Orange Mountain Music released an album of solo piano transcriptions of Philip Glass's Oscar and Golden Globe nominated score to 'The Hours'. These transcriptions were done by Glass's longtime Music Director, pianist Michael Riesman. His transcription of 'The Hours' proved so successful that Orange Mountain Music approached him to do a follow-up recording. The favourite to make another arrangement was Glass's haunting score to director Tod Browning's 1931 classic Dracula which starred Béla Lugosi as the world's best-known vampire. Riesman says "Dracula was an obvious choice, with its seductive moods of tempestuous fury and eerie mystery, throbbing tension and quiet lyricism." Glass's original score was commissioned as part of Universal's Classic Monsters collection in 1999 because the film, being released at a time when there was still very limited technology for sound pictures, had never had any music other than for its title sequences. Glass's scoring for string quartet was recorded (with Michael Riesman as co-producer) and toured by the Kronos Quartet. This new arrangement receives a virtuosic performance by Riesman and includes a previously unrecorded track, an epilogue, which neither appeared on the soundtrack album nor on the DVD release.

Although Philip Glass has composed music for over 30 films - among them `Candyman', `The Thin Blue Line', `The Fog of War', `The Hours', and `Undertow' (all available on Orange Mountain Music), the QATSI trilogy, `The Truman Show', `The Illusionist' and the current `Notes on a Scandal' - this score marks the first that the composer himself considers a classic. "Many films have been made based on Dracula since the original in 1931 - however, none is equal to the original in eloquence or the sheer power to move us." Dracula remains a masterpiece of the horror genre, the more so when viewed with Glass's chilling music which stays away from the obvious effects associated with such movies.

Personnel: Michael Riesman, solo piano

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on 20 Sep 2007
Format: Audio CD
Composed for the 1931 "Dracula" by Tod Browning. In this CD the music has been arranged for solo piano by Michael Riesman. Listening to that music gives an amazing feeling. It is composed to accompany and follow a film and yet, without the film we follow the dramatic tension of a drama behind, beyond. The music can stand by itself. And the first characteristic of film music is obvious here. It cannot be well-tempered because it has to follow the rhythm of the film, of the editing, and the tempo is constantly changing from one sentence to the next even when the theme is the same, when it is a variation on the previous sentence. Film expressivity for music means that ill-tempered aspect, especially a thriller of any type because such a film has to break the rhythm of the tale all the time with frightening and intense elements. It also means constant variations in power and the blending of a theme into another like any sequence elliptically merges into or delivers the next one, just like a sequence elliptically merges and separates from the previous one. Very few films nowadays have a continuous music on their sound tracks. The old scores of mute films were often very repetitive. Here Glass manages to get some constant coloration with some repetitive elements from the left hand on the piano, but then he widely uses the right hand to break it, to jump beyond and multiply the richness and blooms of the music. And it is very interesting to see (track 8) how the left hand has the common rhythm and then the right hand provides a second rhythm that takes over, superimposes itself like a character strutting on a stage and in a setting that surrounds him and yet in which he does not get lost.Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Even better than best 20 Sep 2007
By Jacques COULARDEAU - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Composed for the 1931 "Dracula" by Tod Browning. In this CD the music has been arranged for solo piano by Michael Riesman. Listening to that music gives an amazing feeling. It is composed to accompany and follow a film and yet, without the film we follow the dramatic tension of a drama behind, beyond. The music can stand by itself. And the first characteristic of film music is obvious here. It cannot be well-tempered because it has to follow the rhythm of the film, of the editing, and the tempo is constantly changing from one sentence to the next even when the theme is the same, when it is a variation on the previous sentence. Film expressivity for music means that ill-tempered aspect, especially a thriller of any type because such a film has to break the rhythm of the tale all the time with frightening and intense elements. It also means constant variations in power and the blending of a theme into another like any sequence elliptically merges into or delivers the next one, just like a sequence elliptically merges and separates from the previous one. Very few films nowadays have a continuous music on their sound tracks. The old scores of mute films were often very repetitive. Here Glass manages to get some constant coloration with some repetitive elements from the left hand on the piano, but then he widely uses the right hand to break it, to jump beyond and multiply the richness and blooms of the music. And it is very interesting to see (track 8) how the left hand has the common rhythm and then the right hand provides a second rhythm that takes over, superimposes itself like a character strutting on a stage and in a setting that surrounds him and yet in which he does not get lost. The most admirable aspect of this music composed in 1999 is that, beyond its stand-alone-ness, the great variety that is constantly accompanying the great continuity and uniformity in tone, is just like a continuo behind all the foreground compositions and arias or solos. In other words he rediscovers the basic element of medieval music based on a continuo to sustain and support or even carry the voices and their variations. This is most clear in tracks 16 and 17 in which Renfield is evoked in his two dimensions: his "craze" and his "cell", and in track 17 he also rediscovers the "Mannheim-ese" descending and ascending scales but with a modern twist, that of the coloration created behind by the left hand. Or think of track 18, the dream with the right hand and the sleeping night with the continuo of the left hand, and both are not even on the same tempo. But what power when the two hands come together and play on the same tempo they can hammer into our vision like in track 23 when Dr Van Helsing confronts Dracula, the two being one in the confrontation. The Epilogue is like making the left hand toll the bells of death in a slow rhythm that is run over by a faster rhythm, that of the right hand of life. Beautiful ending.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, University Paris Dauphine, University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne & University Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
accessible Glass 17 Aug 2013
By michael stanfield - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Philip glass is generally an acquired taste, but Riesman always does such a fantastic job making the mathematically rhythmic music appealing to a broad audience. frankly, I've always preferred Glass' music on solo piano, and this soundtrack is one of my favorites, in part because I like it as much on the original string quartet. but it's even better on piano.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Amazing 29 Mar 2011
By J. J. Salyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This has to be one of the most amazing solo piano recordings I've ever listened to. In terms of its musical artistry of the performer alone it rates as nothing short of draw dropping, but I'd rate its compositional values right up there with Bach's 24 prelude and fugues and Chopin's. In fact one could argue that the Chopin C minor prelude is very smiliar to this in ters of emotional gravity. These tunes get in your head and you'll want to hear them again and again. Particuarly the opening, the Dracula Reinfield track and Dracula in the theatre track. The emotional depth and the dramatic power of this recording is incredible. Michael Riseman is nothing short of perfection on these tracks. What a great recording.
11 of 17 people found the following review helpful
...skip the kronos recording and go with this..... 7 July 2007
By L. Steidl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
...brilliant piano transcription of the powerful Glass score for 1931's "Dracula".......playing which simply rocks the senses with it's power and subtlety....i find it so much more "definitive" than the original recording made with the Kronos Quartet...always found their interpretation oh-so screechy and monotonous...never could get through it, even when accompanied with the visual of the film......hearing this version made me re-evaluate this wondrous music as if hearing for the first time...
Luigi ~ nyc
Five Stars 7 Aug 2014
By Sonya Marie - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Brilliant composition by Philip Glass and exquisitely performed by Micheal Riesman. Highly recommended.
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