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Dracula: The Un-Dead Paperback – 24 Sep 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (24 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 000731034X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007310340
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.8 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 456,066 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Dacre Stoker is the great grand nephew of Dracula author, Bram Stoker. He lives with his wife, Jenne, in South Carolina. The Un-dead is his first novel.

Ian Holt studied at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts before becoming a renowned screen writer.


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Customer Reviews

2.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By M. A. Shea on 25 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
I had great hopes for this book as I love the original Dracula story. However, this book is a real let down. The plot is muddled, the characters feeble & unlikeable, & the writing & language poor & more in keeping with a detective novel. The strength of Bram Stoker's original story was in the gradual build up to the horror of Dracula & some of the descritions made the flesh creep. There was none of that in this novel ---- it was full on blood & guts, with a bit of lesbian sex thrown in! According to the authors, Dracula is a pretty good guy, and on the side of God (or vice versa). To anyone thinking of purchasing this book, my advice would be ---- don't!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
Out of all classic literary characters, the one that inspires the most sequels, adaptations, reimaginings and general bastardizations is Count Dracula.

And while most of the sequels focusing on the legendary count are bad, "Dracula the Un-Dead" is in a class of putrid wretchedness all its own. You would think that the great-nephew of a classic author would try to produce a suitable sequel that reflected some of the original's glory, but Dacre Stoker -- with the help of screenwriter Ian Holt -- seems more interested in raining contempt and mockery down on the original "Dracula."

Twenty-five years after the events of "Dracula," Quincey Harker is an aspiring young actor who is taken under the wing of the Romanian actor Basarab (you get three guesses who this is, and the first two don't count). Unfortunately, around this time John Seward is brutally killed while trying to kill the depraved vampire Elizabeth Bathory -- and other people who once fought Dracula also start dying at the same time. And during all this, Jack the Ripper shows signs of reappearing, which Inspector Cotswold thinks may be connected to Van Helsing.

Upon learning of his mother's past -- how she slept with Dracula and is still obsessed with him -- Quincey vows to take revenge on the vampire for his attacks on the Harker family. But it turns out that all the remaining survivors of that group are... pathetically decrepit in their own particular ways. Bathory is planning to take her ultimate revenge on Dracula... or the people who tried to kill him. I'm not quite sure. Anyway, Quincey Harker may be the only thing that can save the world... and since he's a blithering idiot, God help the world.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lecari on 14 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
I mostly didn't like this book. It didn't feel like a proper sequel, at all. I actually agree with other reviewers that this feels more like a film sequel because it is just SO BAD, and it does read like a film rather than a novel. It felt like several books squished into one - part Victorian detective, part Dracula/Bathory angst, part 'heroes'. Oh yes, and throw in Mina and Jonathan Harker's son, Quincey, and his aspirations to be an actor into the mix as well as a subplot.

Okay:
- I hated that Bram Stoker was in it. I was going to nitpick that his knowing Oscar Wilde and all these name-dropping of famous Victorian celebs is just UNREALISTIC but Wikipedia says that it all really did happen. So I won't. But it still was a bit annoying.
- I didn't like the way that every character seemed to be totally different. I could understand this, since it has been 25yrs since Dracula and that sort of secret would probably play havoc on anyone. BUT, there appeared to be a total character change in almost everyone.
- I didn't like that the villain took a complete 180 - all of a sudden Dracula is not the evil villain we were led to believe in book 1, but he was just a champion for god, doing what's right! He is just SO misunderstood! But it's ok, he forgives everyone. HUGS. Um, I don't think so. I didn't mind Bathory's character so much, she did seem genuinely evil and a real threat, and giving Dracula a purpose and a character/personality was nice too. But I'm just not ready to see Dracula as The Good Guy. It basically re-writes the original book (and all Stoker's original idea) completely!
- I was not entirely sure about all the sex scenes that suddenly appeared as well. I'm sure the original was not this graphic.
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Olly Buxton on 3 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A few years ago, the spoof metal band Bad News recorded a cover of Bohemian Rhapsody. The point of the joke was to be deliberately awful, and it reached a crescendo with a guitar solo so wincingly bad that it could only be the work of a genuis. And, surprise, surprise, the Bad News cover was overseen by none other than Queen's Brian May himself.

I mention it because I can't think of any other sensible explanation for this book - the Brian May in this case being not Bram Stoker, but his great grand-nephew, Dacre. Perhaps the Stoker literary genius is, like its creation, immortal, and lives on in the frame of his diluted bloodline. Unlikely, and it would only make sense if said inheritor were also possessed of an unusually well-developed sense of irony, and a mind to mock his more famous Irish ancestor the way Brian May once mocked his own guitar solo.

As I say, unlikely.

Mr Stoker has been co-opted by a "well-known Dracula Historian" called Ian Holt. I wonder if this is the same Ian Holt who scripted Dr Chopper, a 2005 straight-to-video release whose IMDB plot summary is: "Five young friends head out to the country for a weekend at the family cabin and run afoul of a group of motorcycle riding madwomen led by the sadistic, knife-wielding plastic surgeon Dr. Fielding."

Having read Dracula: The Undead, I have a sneaking suspicion it just might be the same Ian Holt.

Now if the sound of Dr. Chopper makes your heart sink, then look away now, for that is, at best, the level of wit and sophistication you will find in this novel.
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