Dr. Strangelove 1963

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(112) IMDb 8.5/10
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Stanley Kubrick's classic black comedy about a group of war-eager military men who plan a nuclear apocalypse is both funny and frightening - and seems as relevant today as ever. Through a series of military and political accidents, two psychotic generals - U.S. Air Force Commander Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) and Joint Chief of Staff "Buck" Turgidson (George C.

Starring:
George C. Scott, Peter Sellers
Runtime:
1 hour 30 minutes

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Dr. Strangelove

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Product Details

Genres Comedy
Director Stanley Kubrick
Starring George C. Scott, Peter Sellers
Supporting actors Sterling Hayden, Keenan Wynn, Slim Pickens, James Earl Jones, Tracy Reed, Peter Bull, Jack Creley
Studio Sony Pictures International
BBFC rating Parental Guidance
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Alex Diaz-Granados on 4 May 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Dr. Strangelove, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is one of the most biting and hard-hitting commentaries about the U.S.-Soviet arms race, overdependence on technology, the can-do philosophy of the Air Force, and the sheer lunacy of MAD, the apt acronym for the term Mutual Assured Destruction -- which was the Cold War diplo-speak that meant "you nuke our country, we'll nuke yours."
Normally one wouldn't think the possibility of nuclear annihilation would be the wellspring for a comedy, just as most people today wouldn't think the Holocaust is fodder for satire. Yet when Stanley Kubrick set out to do a straightforward dramatic film based on novelist Peter George's "Red Alert," a novel about an "accidental" nuclear attack on the Soviet Union by the United States, the more research and contemplation the director and co-screenwriter did on the subject of nuclear deterrence and all the nitty gritty of nuclear warfare, the more insane the whole theme seemed. So Kubrick -- no doubt aware that a similarly themed film (Fail-Safe) was underway -- gave in to his impulses and switched gears from drama to "dark" comedy.
Kubrick sets the tone right from the main title sequence. As the credits (and you have to see these yourself) roll, we see footage of a B-52 Stratofortress being refueled by a KC-135A aerial tanker. In the background, the very romantic strains of "Try a Little Tenderness" gives this aerial ballet an almost grotesque ironic counterpoint. Love music? In a scene depicting a nuclear bomber being refueled as it heads toward its fail-safe point?
Things get going, though, when Royal Air Force liaison officer Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake (Peter Sellers) gets an unexpected phone call from Burpleson AFB's B-52 wing commander, Gen. Jack D.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "theguytoo" on 9 Jan 2004
Format: DVD
This and numerous other satirical tongue-in-cheek quotes will be found throught this fine film. It is as funny as it is frightening and outlines a world where the threat of 'the bomb' is right on everyone's doorstep. In it you'll be pleased to find an all-star cast including Peter Sellers, (who does a fantastic job playing 3 characters all by himself) George C. Scott, and a young James Earl Jones. That's right, folks...the Bell Atlantic Man himself in charge of a nuclear payload aboard his very own B-17. Sellers plays the President, Group Captain Lyonel Mandrake, and the mysterious and chilling Dr. Strangelove. If you know anything about the Cold War era, give this one a try...you'll love it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Man from poundstretcher on 20 Feb 2012
Format: Blu-ray
Mr Kubrick' best film. Spectacular pristine black and white cinematography catch every tic (on dvd).
As an anti war director Stan had previous form -also see Paths of Glory which highlighted the futility, and corruption of -and by, the powerful in 1st World War France. With "Dr Strangelove..." the whole is greater than the sum of its many brilliant parts.
Here flouridation is cited as the cause of a US airbase commander' reason for bringing Armageddon. The hawks circle initially ready to carve up the percieved victory, gradually it dawns that they are become vultures.
They realise that "the plan" has failed and that the war has been lost before it has been declared.
The finale -culminating in Slim Pickens last Rodeo ride on the last bomb especially vivid backed by an ironic We'll meet again (- dont know where dont know when...)
The venality (and naivety) of politicians, soldiers and cogniscenti are beautifully co-ordinated by an ensemble cast. Bravura performances from Peters Sellers, George C Scott and Slim Pickens.
The tone hugely influenced Black Adder goes forth (my opinion) and the satire and horror mix wonderfully uneasily. A reverse visualisation of TS Elliot's expectation that the world ends on a whimper, with Dante to follow.... played out as farce. Another must see. AAA+
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59 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Remus on 17 Oct 2010
Format: Blu-ray
You'll have to read the product description for all the extras and subtitled languages - what interests me is the film itself.

To say the film is perfect would be stretching the truth a little. The trouble (as viewers of the various DVD editions will know) is that Dr Strangelove was not filmed in a consistent aspect ratio, so every subsequent editor has to decide how to combine the full frame shots (1.33:1) with the matte in camera shots (1.66:1). To me it seems obvious that the open matte scenes were meant to be cropped to match the rest, but obvious is not a term usually associated with Kubrick. Nevertheless the makers of the blu-ray have done just this, presenting the entire film in 1.66:1. This results in thin vertical black lines either side of the picture when viewed on a 16:9 television, or an equal-sized border when viewed on a 1920x1200 monitor.

In my opinion this is a better solution than the mixed format of all the DVD releases. Besides which, this is how the film was originally seen in cinemas - at least in Europe; in the US it was apparently projected in 1.85:1. However, various sources (mostly tied with the mixed-aspect ratio LaserDisc and DVD releases) assert that Kubrick actually intended the film be projected in mixed format.

Then there is the matter of picture quality. Kubrick sometimes seemed to go out of his way to find grainy film stock, but in this case it was probably justified as the entire film is shot at night (even on the bomber flying over Russia). What this means, however, is that the blu-ray is not the dramatic improvement over DVD that is seen in other films. But I think this is as good as it gets.
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