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Down Til Dawn CD

4 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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£13.77 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Polytechnic Store


Product details

  • Audio CD (30 April 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Shatterproof
  • ASIN: B000OCY3WU
  • Other Editions: Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 357,102 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Bible Stories
  2. Won't You Come Around?
  3. Man Overboard
  4. Rain Check
  5. Cold Hearted Business
  6. Still Spinning
  7. Pep
  8. Quay Street
  9. Hoof
  10. Polling Card
  11. Running Out Of Ideas

Product Description

Product Description

Polytechnic - Down Til Dawn

BBC Review

Here we go again, another Manchester band intent on forging the sound of Oasis, The Stone Roses and the Happy Mondays into their own modern day schlock. No doubt the singer oozes the same cocksure swagger as messieurs Gallagher and Ryder and is obsessed with unleashing all things nu-baggy on the masses. Move on boys we've seen it all before.

But hang on a pop jangling minute, this lot are called Polytechnic not No Waysis. You know Polytechnic, as in college rock, as in jolly indie tunes straight out of the same school as Weezer, The Magic Numbers and Pavement. So you see there isn't a whiff of "Fools Gold" or Morning Glory here. Just a lethal dose of Americana and all things Trans-Atlantic.

Like The Magic Numbers before them, in ''Man Overboard'' the Manc hippies craft up a luscious dollop of shanty town pop as singer Dylan Giles screams: 'Man Overboard, Man Overboard, Man', over a hooky chorus as if his life depended on it. It's a catchy formula which works brilliantly on the priceless "Pep" and the racing beauty of "Running Out Of Ideas".

And when the Mancs throw in huge pop anthem "Hoof", it's almost as if the bookworm newcomers have crafted a winner in debut album Down Til Dawn.

That is until the happy clapping quintet go all gloomy and play the Radiohead card on us with the desolate and downright dreary "Polling Card". To make matters worse, while their pop jangle works brilliantly at times, it tires and trudges along tragically elsewhere (see "Still Spinning" , "Bible Stories", "Quay Street"). Fortunately the majority of Down Til Dawn's pop belters manage to outshine the dumpers on this debut. It's just a pity there aren't more of them.

Polytechnic's first act then. It ain't top of the class but it gets an A for effort. --Damian Jones

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This band are the best I've heard in a long time. Great production, musianship and intelligence. Lots of different things going on in the songs and some exhilirating pop. Influences I hear most clearly are the Stone Roses, Janes Addiction and Supergrass; an interesting mix! They are good live too coming across well - less self-conscious and pretentious than so many other upcoming bands. Makes a refreshing change.
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Format: Audio CD
Do you remember that post-baggy rush to sign up so-called "indie" groups with an ear for melody and a penchant for polite guitars? Where the label chucks some money at a band, gives them a polish, sends out an inordinate amount of promo cds only for the debut album to stall in the charts, enter the bargain bins, and result in a dissolved contract and obscurity? I fear Polytechnic could go the way of The High, The Real People, Rain, et al. A band peddling generic guitar-led pop ain't necessarily a BAD thing, but unless you mix something a bit special into this tried and tested musical recipe, there's always a danger of producing something all too bland and unmemorable. Unfortunately, Polytechnic veer into this danger zone a little too often on their debut album.

Initial impressions are favourable. It's a very "nice" album, not one to make your groin twitch, but certainly a decent listen. You can see why they supported Keane on tour. They occupy that musical comfort zone for people who want their tunes breezy but not too edgy. Opener "Bible Stories" intrigues, a slow burner with a pounding bass line, appealing guitar twang and a certain unease, like a cowboy riding through a deserted Manchester city centre at night. It also introduces us to Dylan Giles' slightly strangled wail (think Howie Payne of The Stands), which often clicks, but sometimes grates.

The straight-up sunshine jangle oo-oo-oooh of "Won't You Come Around" is an absolute delight, a thrilling leap through a meadow of long grass, with a joyous shake of your bowlie and a manic grin plastered over your face. You must have had one of those moments. In your daydreams at least.
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Format: Audio CD
This is a superb debut album for a Manchester band who certainly deserve a lot more attention. On first listen the singles Pep, Man overboard and Cold hearted business stand out, but this album is a real grower. Full of beautifuly crafted tunes and lyrics. Definately my most played album this year by far. They're playing all the festivals this summer and the music certainly suits that festival vibe.

Along with Keith, Autokat, Cherry Ghost are part of a steadly growing Manchester scene of top qualty song'SMITH'ing!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
First thing I heard of Polytechnic was when their single `Pep' won the Roundtable on Steve Lamacq's 6 Music show ages ago. Great single: sounded quite a bit like Supergrass circa `I Should Coco', which is no bad thing. It was quite a while before the album came out, and I pre-ordered it with high expectations. It gives me no pleasure to say that the album is a bit of a let-down, and the title of the last song, `Running Out of Ideas', makes for a pretty accurate review.

If any of the songs off `Down Til Dawn' were surreptitiously inserted into any Supergrass album, they wouldn't sound out of place, because they sound like Supergrass in their more jangly moments, and the singer sounds similar. The difference is that Supergrass have a mixture of slow, fast, quiet, loud, silly and serious songs on their albums. While Polytechnic's songs undoubtedly shows promise, listening to the whole album you start to feel that they're a bit of a one-trick pony. All the songs stick to roughly the same pace, song structure and instrumentation, and by the time you get to about the third or fourth track, the album starts to bore.

My advice is don't play this in the car unless you have a disk changer, because you WILL want to change it before you reach the halfway stage. I hate to be mean-spirited about this record because all the songs in themselves are pretty good fun, and would sound great mixed in with songs by other artists to add a bit of variety. As an album though, it drags. I hope they change the pace a bit on later albums.
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