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Down On The Farm
 
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Down On The Farm

1 Jan 1979 | Format: MP3

5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 33.46 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
4:21
2
2:32
3
3:49
4
3:00
5
3:58
6
4:56
7
4:50
8
4:11
9
4:45

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 1979
  • Release Date: 1 Jan 1979
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the United States and WEA International Inc., for the world outside of the United States
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 36:22
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B006ICNXCQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 80,865 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on 3 Nov 2007
Format: Audio Cassette
"Down on the Farm" was the last album to feature leadsinger, guitarist and songwriter Lowell George. Actually George had left the band before the album was finished, and sadly during a solo tour in 1979 he died from a heart-attack. George had always been the driving force in the band, but due to health-problems ( drugs/alcohol) his position in the band had diminished after "Feats Don't Fail Me Now".

The previous album "Time Loves a Hero" had very little input from George and their musical style had become much more slick and and funky.

After George's death the other bandmembers decided to finish the album they had been working on before George left. Fortunately George had recorded vocals for most of the tracks, and he wrote 5 of the songs on the album. The album is often referred to as one of the weaker albums from the George era, a fact I never understood. It's no exaggeration that it's one my personal favourites.

George's vocals were never better and his songs are outstanding. "Be One Now" is simply heartbreaking. "Kokomo" and "Six Feet of Snow" are as good as anything on "Dixie Chicken" or "Feats". The title track written by Barrere is catchy and funky and featuring one his strongest vocal performances - I used to believe it was George singing.

Among the rest of the album's tracks "Straight From the Heart", written by George and Payne also deserves to be brought out.

The final two tracks could be the reason that the album as a whole is often underrated. They are nice tracks; a little too polished for my taste, with very litle, if any, input from George. Still a great album.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
As Little Feat were working on their seventh studio album, Lowell George was just marginally part of the group, spending much of his time completing his solo album, Thanks I'll Eat It Here. While he was touring in support of the record, he suffered a massive heart attack and died, leaving behind an uncompleted record with Little Feat. After mourning, the band regrouped and patched together Down on the Farm, the last album of the Lowell-led era. Since George was preoccupied during the recording, it's not surprising that he only makes himself heard on occasion on the album. It's also not surprising that the group was suffering, not just from the loss of a colleague, but from a lack of direction. They were drifting on Time Loves a Hero, after all, and while this is musically a little more straightforward than that fusion-flavored affair, it still is fairly uninspired. The surfaces are very slick, as should be expected with late-'70s Californian rock, which again doesn't let the group breathe, but the real problem is that the material is just not terribly memorable. Given the circumstances surrounding the completion of Down on the Farm, it's fairly easy to forgive the band this misstep, but it doesn't make the album any less disheartening.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Morten Vindberg on 3 Nov 2007
Format: Audio CD
"Down on the Farm" was the last album to feature leadsinger, guitarist and songwriter Lowell George. Actually George had left the band before the album was finished, and sadly during a solo tour in 1979 he died from a heart-attack. George had always been the driving force in the band, but due to health-problems ( drugs/alcohol) his position in the band had diminished after "Feats Don't Fail Me Now".

The previous album "Time Loves a Hero" had very little input from George and their musical style had become much more slick and and funky.

After George's death the other bandmembers decided to finish the album they had been working on before George left. Fortunately George had recorded vocals for most of the tracks, and he wrote 5 of the songs on the album. The album is often referred to as one of the weaker albums from the George era, a fact I never understood. It's no exaggeration that it's one my personal favourites.

George's vocals were never better and his songs are outstanding. "Be One Now" is simply heartbreaking. "Kokomo" and "Six Feet of Snow" are as good as anything on "Dixie Chicken" or "Feats". The title track written by Barrere is catchy and funky and featuring one his strongest vocal performances - I used to believe it was George singing.

Among the rest of the album's tracks "Straight From the Heart", written by George and Payne also deserves to be brought out.

The final two tracks could be the reason that the album as a whole is often underrated. They nice tracks; a little too polished for my taste, with very litle, if any, input from George. Still a great album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jackie P on 5 Nov 2013
Format: Audio CD
Apparently one track (Front Page News) is NOT the same version as was featured on the original LP. To hear the original album 'Down On The Farm' on CD (in improved remastered sound too) you have to get hold of a copy of this 2xCD.....

Time Loves a Hero / Down On the Farm
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. D. Bickerstaffe on 23 Nov 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A lot of rubbish is talked about Little Feat albums. The early albums are said to feature a lot of good Lowell George material and be good, and the later ones be dominated by the other members and be bad. In fact the early Feat albums suffered from an inability to capture the rounded organic sound of the live band, have weedy production (and songs like Willin' and Tripe Face Boogie are given a second go on subsequent albums), and a lot of so-so material. In fact the live shows demonstrate that the band drew their set from quite a small body of material throughout their career (catch Feb 14 1976 Winterland to hear them at their height)and Lowell George was never very prolific.
The group did not really take off until the introduction of Paul Barrere and his contibutions tended to be a lot less 'prog-rock' than those of keyboardist, Bill Payne (witness The Fan!) but they both added great songs to mix with Skin it Back (feeble on album, enormous live) and the immortal All That You Dream.
Down on the Farm was the last Little Feat album with Lowell George and followed the tame, rather mannered, Time Loves a Hero, so things did not bode well. However, it turned out to be one of their best albums ever, especially as they'd finally got the rich band sound on to record. The opening title track is a solid and cheerful number sung by Barrere, but the next six numbers are all sung by Lowell George in truly fine voice. Although he was supposed to have been leaving/left by this point George also writes or co-writes five of the numbers, including Straight From the Heart, and Front Page News with Bill Payne which are both great. Be One Now (with Fred Tackett) is also good, demonstrating George's amazing ability to work a very subtle melody, and Barrere's Perfect Imperfection is another fine song. Only the last two tracks on the album (by Payne and Clayton) sound weak, but the quality of the rest of the album means that it is wholeheartedly recommended.
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