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Down Set Fight!: 1
 
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Down Set Fight!: 1 [Kindle Edition]

Chris Sims , Chad Bowers , Scott Kowalchuk
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

Product Description

One man versus every mascot in professional sports. THEY WILL ALL BE PUNCHED. It’s kick-off time for this year’s most action-packed and hilarious comic!

"Fearless" Chuck Fairlane was football’s fastest rising star, but his career came to a screeching halt when he was expelled from the league after goin’ HAM and causing the biggest brawl in the history of sports. Years later, Chuck has found peace as a high school football coach, until costumed mascots begin attacking him for seemingly no reason. Before long, Chuck's going to discover that you can't run away from the past—but you CAN punch it square in the face!

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 100258 KB
  • Print Length: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Oni Press (12 Feb 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HDXUFRA
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,022,736 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very tedious comic 12 Feb 2014
By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition
“Fearless” Chuck Fairlane is a promising young football player, the best in his team, destined to become one of the all-time greats. Except his degenerate gambling father, Al, who pushed him to be the best, goes one step too far after a match, taunting his son and reminding him who made him what he is, and Chuck snaps. He hauls one off on one of the team’s mascots and then begins swinging at everyone. The incident becomes infamous and fighting team mascots becomes known as “fairlaning”. For Chuck, it ended his football career, though he was able to bring his dad down, sending him away to prison for running a gambling syndicate. 10 years later and Chuck’s a high school football coach - and suddenly mascots are showing up in his life again, demanding he fight them, coincidentally just as his dad is released from prison…

Down Set Fight is an original story in that I haven’t read a comic, or seen a movie, TV show, or anything - about a guy punching mascots, but you quickly realise while reading it why that is: it’s really boring to read. A guy punching mascots is not an interesting story, and trying to present it as something that has the entire United States mesmerised, to the point where they lose interest in the football itself, is stretching belief too far because when you see the fights themselves, they’re extremely underwhelming to read.

The story then switches from Chuck punching mascots to him suddenly going on the run and somehow evading a nationwide police search for months! Yeah… no. We’re supposed to believe this guy’s somehow Batman or someone? He’s a high school coach who’s good at football, not the Punisher! Also, defending yourself against a lunatic with knives coming at you in a restaurant does not mean you have to go on the lam.
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Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interested in seeing a grown man suplex a Chinese dragon mascot? 10 Feb 2014
By Travis Starnes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
How do you describe a book like this? At the beginning it reminds me a bit of the film ‘Moneyball’ where a young sportsman, Chuck Fairlane, is thrown into a big sporting event, but whereas the young baseball player in the film crumbles under the pressure, Fairlane thrives on the football field. He is the undisputed MVP of his team and his father wants him to get traded up the leagues to make some real money. That is until he flips out at his gambling addicted dad and beats up the team mascot, then his own team and coaches and then the opposition team as well. On that day ‘Fearless’ Fairlane is born, but it coincides with the last day of his sporting career as no one can cause that much carnage and not be arrested.

The comic builds the madness as it goes on and if you read the first issue and then straight on to the last issue, you would hardly recognise the comic. This is not a bad thing, just that it is the first time that I have ever seen a limited series develop so much and be so different by the end, but still feel like a coherent story. This has been planned out so well, winding up the background insanity from a tiny insect buzz to a full on 140 piece orchestration complete with pipe organ and cannons, but so carefully that you only notice the change in retrospect.

The art style throughout the comic reminds me both of a modern comic, but also very early silver age Marvel. The ‘chapter’ headings in their white circular box are so reminiscent of the ones used in the first Fantastic Four comics and the slightly blocky character drawings remind me a little of Jack Kirby, but with more variation in the faces and heavier inking. It is a style that works very nicely with this story but it is a little on low on the detail which I normally prefer.

If anyone is a bit bored of superheroes and wants a fun undemanding comic to read, then I really do recommend this. I thought at first that it was going to be a sports comic and the amount I know about ‘American Rugby’ is summed up in those two words, but the sport is just the framing for the rest of the story and even I got most of the references. Perhaps if someone had gone through the American school system and played sports then there would be a little more resonance with the story, but I did not feel that I missed anything. Anyone who has ever liked wrestling, has a sense of humour or appreciated a 90’s consol fighting game should find something in this comic that appeals to them and if you have the full set, then you should love it.
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly better than I thought it .would be. Outlandish and silly with some serious food for thought. 5 May 2014
By W. McCoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
'Down. Set. Fight!' took what I thought would be a one note joke (mainly based on the cover) and actually turned it into an interesting story. It's about athletes and athlete parents. It's also about the bonds we have as family, and how unhealthy those can be.

When "Fearless" Chuck Fairlane is told to throw a game by his father for a bet, the consequences lead to Chuck beating up a mouthy mascot on the field, as well as all other comers to the fight, like the opposing team and his own. He walks away from the game and ten years later, we catch up with him as a high school football coach. Unbeknownst to him, there is a phenomenon called "fairlaning" that has team mascots starting fights. When one comes after Chuck, it starts him on a mission to find out what's behind it. Fortunately, the kind of cruel training regimen his father put him through has toughened Chuck to the point of superhuman strength.

It's funny and oddly touching. Chuck just wants to live his life and his father continually interferes. There is dark humor about parents of athletes here. The mascots are larger than life and comical. The art feels like a throwback to an earlier era in comic art and I liked it.

I was given a review copy of this graphic novel by Diamond Book Distributors and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
3.0 out of 5 stars Mean mascots 31 Mar 2014
By Alt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Sports stories don't always translate well to graphic novels (or to fiction in general), but Down Set Fight begins with an interesting departure from the usual "losers learn to be winners" theme. Chuck Fairlane is a winner who becomes a loser when he responds to an insult by starting a brawl with a team mascot that gets him kicked out of football. The real story starts ten years later, when Fairlane is under investigation for gambling and the mascots are fighting back. Of course, the FBI agent who investigates him (for no clear reason) is hot and, of course, she can't resist Fairlane's charm.

The story has its moments (the Vince Lombardi quotations are good) but it also has some stupid moments. FBI agents generally don't shoot unarmed mascots, even if they look like really mean bears, and bullets don't usually bounce off mascots, even if their bear suits are really tough. Football players can't outfight two entire teams no matter how tough they are. Fathers don't make their sons run across busy highways blindfolded to learn how to dodge tacklers and, if they did, their sons wouldn't survive.

Eventually the story degenerates from stupid to preposterous. It's unfortunate to see a potentially original spin on a sports story wasted on an over-the-top plot and trite characterization, but that's what happened here. I would give this 2 1/2 stars if I could.
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious, fun, and well-paced 26 Feb 2014
By Christopher M Ellis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is perfect for anyone who enjoys a ridiculously high-concept idea that is well-executed. It delves into the idea of melding football with pro wrestling, to hilarious effect. A must-read for anyone who likes fun stories that don't put on any airs in regards to being 'higher' forms of art. The art by Kowalchuk steals the book, being well-paced and kinetic while staying within its cartoonish-style. It's hard to tell whether the plot comes more from the words or the art, which is always the sign of a great comic book.
2.0 out of 5 stars Very tedious comic 10 Feb 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
“Fearless” Chuck Fairlane is a promising young football player, the best in his team, destined to become one of the all-time greats. Except his degenerate gambling father, Al, who pushed him to be the best, goes one step too far after a match, taunting his son and reminding him who made him what he is, and Chuck snaps. He hauls one off on one of the team’s mascots and then begins swinging at everyone. The incident becomes infamous and fighting team mascots becomes known as “fairlaning”. For Chuck, it ended his football career, though he was able to bring his dad down, sending him away to prison for running a gambling syndicate. 10 years later and Chuck’s a high school football coach - and suddenly mascots are showing up in his life again, demanding he fight them, coincidentally just as his dad is released from prison…

Down Set Fight is an original story in that I haven’t read a comic, or seen a movie, TV show, or anything - about a guy punching mascots, but you quickly realise while reading it why that is: it’s really boring to read. A guy punching mascots is not an interesting story, and trying to present it as something that has the entire United States mesmerised, to the point where they lose interest in the football itself, is stretching belief too far because when you see the fights themselves, they’re extremely underwhelming to read.

The story then switches from Chuck punching mascots to him suddenly going on the run and somehow evading a nationwide police search for months! Yeah… no. We’re supposed to believe this guy’s somehow Batman or someone? He’s a high school coach who’s good at football, not the Punisher! Also, defending yourself against a lunatic with knives coming at you in a restaurant does not mean you have to go on the lam.

Nonsensical story aside, the book is filled with cliches. Remember in Jerry Maguire those cutscenes of Dicky Fox’s soundbites? In Down Set Fight, instead of Dicky, you’ve got Vince Lombardi quotes at the beginning of each chapter. Think he’ll show up in some kind of hallucinatory scene later on? You betcha! Remember that George Clooney movie, Out of Sight, where he went on the run and was chased by hot agent Jennifer Lopez? We’ve got the same character here with Agent Molly Harrison. How about a sad scene where there’s rain at a funeral? Yup, there’s one of those scenes here as well. Need to a character to explain themselves? Have an FBI Agent show up to make you spout exposition! Also that subplot about Molly thinking Chuck was running an underground gambling ring was so half-assed, you could tell it was there purely to put Chuck and Molly together, not because it made any sense. How about having the bad guy show up at the end and explain his diabolical plot? Check! Where’s the imagination or the effort to come up with something different?

I’m not sure what the tone of the book is. Chuck and Al’s relationship is supposed to be taken seriously, I think, because Chuck finally standing up to his dad is presented as this big moment in the character’s life, but the whole story is written as a joke that this “serious” scene sits very awkwardly among more blatantly comic scenes. Al himself is a difficult character to take seriously because he’s so one-dimensional. This is a guy who sets bear traps on his lawn for his son to lift his knees up running, rather than use tires like other coaches. Or blindfolding his son and making him run across traffic. And then when his wife dies, he doesn’t go to the funeral and forces his son to train instead. He couldn’t be written as more cartoonishly evil! Realistically, Chuck would’ve stood up to him years before but doesn’t because that’s not in the script, because that’s the big “emotional” finale.

Down Set Fight’s premise is really too thin to work as a full length graphic novel. A disgraced football player punching mascots and then punching his one-dimensional evil dad is not enough to fill 150 pages, it’s more like a B-plot to a larger story - what that story would be (maybe a satire on modern America?), I’m not entirely sure, but by itself? A total snoozefest. None of the characters seem remotely real and the story is tedious most of the time. By the way, Chris Sims AND Chad Bowers, really? It took 2 guys to write this drek? Scott Kowalchuk’s art is definitely the highlight of the book, he does his best to make Sims/Bowers’ clunky script work and many of the mascot designs were good. Maybe if you’re a wrestling fan, Down Set Fight is for you - it’s about a man punching multiple men in silly costumes - but generally I wouldn’t recommend this forgettable book to anyone, it’s simply not a good comic.
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