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Down In The Groove (Remastered)
 
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Down In The Groove (Remastered)

14 Oct 2013 | Format: MP3

5.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
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Popularity  
30
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3:09
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2:14
30
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2:29
30
4
5:09
30
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2:52
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3:30
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3:05
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2:55
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3:38
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10
2:58

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Oct 2013
  • Release Date: 11 Oct 2013
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 31:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00FHO645Y
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 64,373 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By D.Williamson on 7 Jan 2003
Format: Audio CD
As a part of Bob's canon, this is not perceived as major, and, to use a cliche, should not be one of the first albums of his you buy - Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61, Blonde on Blonde, Blood On The Tracks would all be good choices. However, for the established Bob fan, this album is by no means abysmal.
Shenandoah, a traditional song which older Bob fans may well have heard from other sources during the folk days of the sixties, is simply awesome - Bob's voice echoes like it would on Good As I've Been To You and World Gone Wrong, and gives an outstandingly poignant rendition. The music is a brilliant adaption of a simple folk melody to an electric sensibility; the rhythm section is pulsating, seething with controlled energy. The song is a landmark in Bob's history, both on its own and as a pointer to his work from the middle '90s onwards, and should not be missed.
Shenandoah is, however, also notable in its initially stark contrast to the rest of the album. The album is essentially a series of covers, many of them rock n' roll standards, or at least rock n' roll influenced. Let's Stick Together is the most famous of these songs, and has appeared in many incarnations over the years - "come on, come on, let's stick together..." - it is the song you think it is! Bob's version is reasonably listenable. When Did You Leave Heaven has a prominent drum beat that seems to emphasise the off beat whilst everyone else plays to the on beat, which gives a somewhat strange effect; if one gets over this, though, this slow song, again with a very fine vocal performance from Bob, is one of the highlights of the album in its emotional power.
These two songs pave the way for the rest of the album, other than Shenandoah; the songs are rollicking rock n' roll or powerful and slow.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mike London on 9 Oct 2012
Format: Vinyl
By the late 1980s, the once sacrosanct Bob Dylan had reached the lowest point of his career. During the mid 1960s, he was untouchable, a critical darling, and on a creative roll that has not been seen since. Things had changed drastically in twenty years. By the end of the 1980s, before the release of OH MERCY, many people thought he finally gave up the ghost creatively. While in some respects Dylan's 80s material is unjustly crucified, in other respects the critical assault was totally accurate about how bad he really got during that decade.

DOWN IN THE GROOVE is one of the prime examples of how badly Dylan's art had decayed. DOWN bears the dubious distinction as being the worst studio album in Dylan's catalogue. While Columbia's revenge album DYLAN from 1973 is arguably worst, at least Dylan didn't sanction that release. This album, however, is truly the bottom of the barrel. Dylan lost all artistic direction during this era of his career.

Just for a little context, by 1988 a lot of people had lost faith in Dylan. He hadn't released a decent record in years. Critics and fans overall found EB, his album from 1985, guilty of glitzy production and bad, dated arrangements, a consensus that has only grown stronger in the ensuing (though for my money, EB is as good as anything he's recorded post 1975). Critics panned his 1986 album, KNOCKED OUT LOADED, which barely dented the charts . In 1987, he started in a movie that was so bad it was never released stateside ("Hearts of Fire"), though the soundtrack had some decent songs. That same year, he did a notoriously bad tour with the Grateful Dead. Then in 1988, he released this dismal album. Things were looking pretty bleak for the Dylan faithful.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By sixtieswarbler on 21 Jun 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I only became a big fan of Dylan 2 years ago and started collecting all his music. I put Down in the Groove at the bottom of my list, as I did not really like his voice at this time. However, after listening to "When did you Leave Heaven", which I cannot stop playing, I decided I must buy this CD. I now love "Rank Stranger To Me" and "Shenandoah". 40+CDs' later, I have learned never to dismiss any of Dylan's albums , as there is always a wee "Gem" in them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dave Gilmour's cat on 12 Mar 2010
Format: Audio CD
A mixed bag, that's for sure: Down in the Groove contains some of Dylan's worst 1980s songs (as if harking back to his mid-decade low points) and some wonderful versions of old songs by other people (as if looking ahead to the wonderful covers-of-traditional-songs albums, Good As I've Been to You and World Gone Wrong). This means you get to hear charmless duds such as 'Had A Dream About You, Baby' and 'The Ugliest Girl In The World', alongside Dylan's spritely but not-quite-there version of Wilbert Harrison's 'Let's Stick Together'. Then there's the Infidels outtake, 'Death Is Not The End' (which somehow ended up waiting five years to be released here), and 'Silvio', which may not be his greatest song but which became something of a live favourite (for Dylan, at least).

What makes this album worthwhile is the closing trio of songs. On 'Ninety Miles An Hour (Down A Dead End Street)', 'Shenandoah' and 'Rank Strangers To Me', Dylan sings with conviction and emotion to deliver a compelling spiritual statement that perhaps hints at where he was heading next: the rediscovering of his songwriting muse - with a bleak new twist - on Oh Mercy.

Much to explore and to enjoy here: give this album a chance.
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